Bi-weekly COVID-19 Situation Report for 6 countries of the Eastern Partnership. 01 February 2022.

Within EU-funded COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for the Eastern Partnership countries AFEW International prepares regular updates on the COVID-19 developments in the region – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. What is the situation today? Please, check it here! 

You can find previous updates in the COVID Corner on our website.

As for 01.02.2022

The number of coronavirus cases per population ratio since the start of the pandemic (January 22, 2020) in the 6 countries of the EaP

Source: Sciences Po Media lab Coronavirus Country Comparator

Situation report Armenia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections in Armenia are at their peak — the highest daily average reported — now at 2,199 new infections reported each day.

— There have been 367,795 infections and 8,053 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Armenia extends existing COVID-19 measures until June 20, 2022.

Domestic measures: all staff must demonstrate proof of COVID-19 vaccination to their employers or self-fund a PCR test every 14 days; some categories of person, including pregnant women, are exempt. Protective face coverings are mandatory in public spaces, including on public transport, and restrictions on gatherings remain in place. Businesses are permitted to reopen provided they maintain strict hygiene and social distancing requirements.

International travel restrictions: international flights are permitted and land borders are open; however, international arrivals via air or land must produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival or evidence of full COVID-19 vaccination. Individuals arriving without the required documentation must pay for a test on arrival and self-isolate until a negative result is confirmed.

Vaccine

— Armenia has administered at least 1,825,382 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 30.9% of the country’s population.

Situation report Azerbaijan

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Azerbaijan, with 3,426 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 82% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on December 14.

— There have been 658,470 infections and 8,734 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Restrictions on travelling to and out of Azerbaijan by air or land are in force until the 1st of March 2022, except for cargo and charter flights.

Vaccine

– Azerbaijan has administered at least 12,000,767 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 59.9% of the country’s population.

Situation report Belarus

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Belarus, with 2,021 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 98% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on October 26.

— There have been 742,953 infections and 6,052 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began. Measures to contain the epidemic

— COVID-19-related restrictions in Belarus remain generally unchanged as of 4 January 2022 by comparison with those in effect during late November. The only substantive change in the government’s directives is that citizens arriving from abroad are no longer required to self-isolate.

Vaccine

– Belarus has administered at least 9,714,033 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 51.3% of the country’s population.

Situation report Georgia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections in Georgia are at their peak — the highest daily average reported — now at 16,647 new infections reported each day.

— There have been 1,175,923 infections and 14,980 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— All vaccinated arrivals must present evidence of a completed vaccination cycle, or of recovery from Covid within 100 days alongside an initial vaccination.

Those arriving via land or sea must also present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, in Georgian, English or Russian. Children under 10 are exempt from the testing requirement.

For non-vaccinated arrivals from the countries listed above, the restrictions are tighter. They must travel direct to Georgia, with no stop-offs or transits. On arrival at the border they must present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, and must take a further PCR test on day three. They must also fill in a contact tracing form.

Situation report Republic of Moldova

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections in Moldova are at their peak — the highest daily average reported — now at 4,463 new infections reported each day.

— There have been 438,249 infections and 10,635 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Markets, restaurants and bars are operating usual hours, including food delivery services. Malls and commercial centres are operating usual working hours (until 10pm). Schooling is both online and in-person. Nightclubs are closed. Restaurants, cafes, theatres, cinemas and concert halls are open, but access will only be permitted upon presentation, either on paper or electronically, of one of the following documents (for persons over the age of 18):

  • a COVID-19 vaccination certificate evidencing full vaccination;
  • a negative PCR test result taken no more than 72 hours before the event;
  • a negative rapid antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before the event;
  • confirmation of the presence of COVlD-19 antibodies (serological antibodies test).The document is valid for a period of 90 days from the date of the test.

You must also carry one form of photo identification as well as your COVID-19 document such as a passport or driving license.

You must wear a mask outside at mass gatherings, and in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets, restaurants, bars and on public transport. Officials have the authority to issue fines for non-compliance. Social distancing of 1m must be observed.

Vaccine

— Moldova has administered at least 1,931,716 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 36.3% of the country’s population.

Situation report Ukraine

Image: Worldometer

COVID-19 cases

— COVID-19 infections in Ukraine are at their peak — the highest daily average reported — now at 27,732 new infections reported each day.

— There have been 4,064,495 infections and 100,203 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Coronavirus measures are in place until 31 March 2022, but may be extended further. Ukraine is operating a colour-coded adaptive quarantine system on a regional (oblasts and Kyiv city) basis. Quarantine measures may be imposed, and change, at short notice. You should check which restrictions apply to the places you intend to visit, and be ready to prove your vaccination status.

In all zones, the following rules apply:

  • you must carry ID with you at all times
  • when in public buildings (including restaurants, hotels and shops) you must maintain a minimum distance of 1.5 m.
  • when in public buildings, and while travelling on public transport and in taxis, you must wear a protective mask covering your nose and mouth
  • Failure to comply with restrictions may result in a fine or, in more serious cases, a prison sentence. Before taking public transport, you should consider whether you will be able to maintain social distancing.

In regions classified as “green” zones, there are minimal restrictions beyond mask-wearing and distancing.

In “yellow” and “orange” zones, mass events are prohibited unless all staff and participants have one of the following: a certificate of full vaccination (within the last 365 days), a certificate of recovery from Covid-19 (within the last 105 days) or a certificate of a negative PCR or rapid-antigen test (within the last 72 hours). The same restrictions apply to the opening of indoor hospitality venues, entertainment and cultural institutions, fitness centres and swimming pools, hostels and guesthouses.

In “red” zones, these measures additionally apply to shopping malls and non-essential retail.

—Supermarkets and other grocery stores, pharmacies, veterinary supplies shops, banks and petrol stations remain open, as well as parks and public spaces.

—Ukraine will accept the UK’s proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record. If you are travelling with a printed PDF proof of vaccination status, it must date from 1 November to ensure that the certificate can be scanned successfully, if domestic certification is required. Your NHS appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.

Vaccine

– Ukraine has administered at least 29,992,963 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 33.8% of the country’s population.

Interesting reads

 

Help to trans and other queer sex workers in Georgia during COVID-19

LGBTQ people represent one of the most vulnerable groups in Georgia.  First, homophobic and transphobic attitudes are quite high in society. Secondly, during the Covid-19 time members of the LGBT+ community who are employed in the trade and service fields or hold blue collar jobs (often with daily or weekly wages) are constantly facing suspension or loss of employment, and therewith increased risk of homelessness.

As a part of the project “EU COVID-19 Solidarity Program for the Eastern Partnership country”, Georgian Queer Association – Temida carried out significant activities which aimed at reducing the harm caused by COVID-19 to trans and other queer sex workers in Georgia.

Beka Gabadadze, advocacy and fundraising team, Queer Association – TEMIDA

«In critical situations, when the country was under lockdown and people lost all sources of income, our team helped 100 LGBT sex workers who were left without income. We provided them with food and internet vouchers.

With the help of a community mobilizer and a social worker, we developed an application form for food and internet vouchers and defined the criteria by which beneficiaries were selected. The criteria were defined as homelessness, unemployment, lack of savings, etc. The application form was distributed to the LGBT sex workers community on dating apps (Grindr, Hornet, etc.), Temida’s Instagram and Facebook pages, as well as dating websites.

Also, with the support of other donors, we began to provide psychological services to beneficiaries through online sessions. As part of the “Eastern Partnership – COVID-19 Solidarity Program”, we provided beneficiaries with the Internet, which involved individual and group sessions with two psychologists in Zoom, which helped trans * and LGBT sex workers to improve the mental health.

The second part of the project was to study the issue of homelessness. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it clear that most LGBT sex workers are homeless. The call for expert selection was announced as a part of the project. The selected expert, Ada Beselia, studied the problems of LGBTQ community members left homeless due to various circumstances and prepared a policy document “The need for LGBTQ community housing in Georgia.” Based on this document, we sent the recommendations to governmental and non-governmental structures. The presentation of the mentioned policy document was also held on “Temida’s” Facebook page. According to the received recommendations, “Temida” has drawn up an advocacy plan for the LGBT community shelter.

After our advocacy regarding shelter issues as part of the Georgian HIV program, National Center for disease control and public health announced the opening of the shelter of victims of transphobic/homophobic oppression.  This is a pilot project in Tbilisi and maybe we can make the same shelters in other two big cities in Georgia”.

For Reference

The COVID-19 Regional Solidarity Program for the Eastern Partnership countries is funded by the European Union and implemented in partnership with People in Need and the Netherlands Helsinki Committee. This project aims to support civil society organizations in response to the immediate and long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Eastern Partnership countries.

 

 

Bi-weekly COVID-19 Situation Report for 6 countries of the Eastern Partnership. 17 January 2022.

Within EU-funded COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for the Eastern Partnership countries AFEW International prepares regular updates on the COVID-19 developments in the region – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. What is the situation today? Please, check it here! 

You can find previous updates in the COVID Corner on our website.

As for 17.01.2022

The number of coronavirus cases per population ratio since the start of the pandemic (January 22, 2020) in the 6 countries of the EaP

Source: Sciences Po Media lab Coronavirus Country Comparator

Situation report Armenia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Armenia, with 233 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 11% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on November 1.

— There have been 347,617 infections and 8,108 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Armenia extends existing COVID-19 measures until June 20, 2022.

Domestic measures: all staff must demonstrate proof of COVID-19 vaccination to their employers or self-fund a PCR test every 14 days; some categories of person, including pregnant women, are exempt. Protective face coverings are mandatory in public spaces, including on public transport, and restrictions on gatherings remain in place. Businesses are permitted to reopen provided they maintain strict hygiene and social distancing requirements.

International travel restrictions: international flights are permitted and land borders are open; however, international arrivals via air or land must produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival or evidence of full COVID-19 vaccination. Individuals arriving without the required documentation must pay for a test on arrival and self-isolate until a negative result is confirmed.

Vaccine

— Armenia has administered at least 1,694,518 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 28.6% of the country’s population.

Situation report Azerbaijan

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Azerbaijan, with 641 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 15% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on December 14.

— There have been 625,726 infections and 8,521 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— A special quarantine regime is imposed in the country until 06:00, 1 March 2022. Functioning of malls and shopping centers, shops, museums and exhibition halls is permitted. Inter-city and inter-regional travel is allowed. On-site services in catering facilities are allowed from 06:00 till 00:00. Cinemas, theatres, entertainment centers in the country are functioning. COVID-19 passport is required for people above 18 to enter catering facilities, hotels, malls and large shopping centers, cinemas, theatres and entertainment centers.

Vaccine

– Azerbaijan has administered at least 11,648,496 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 58.1% of the country’s population.

Situation report Belarus

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Belarus, with 1,050 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 51% of the peak – the highest daily average reported on October 26.

— There have been 715,643 infections and 5,824 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— COVID-19-related restrictions in Belarus remain generally unchanged as of 4 January 2022 by comparison with those in effect during late November. The only substantive change in the government’s directives is that citizens arriving from abroad are no longer required to self-isolate.

Vaccine

– Belarus has administered at least 8,914,267 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 47.1% of the country’s population.

Situation report Georgia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections in Georgia are at their peak – the highest daily average reported – now at 5,116 new infections reported each day. Average number of new infections reported in Georgia each day reaches new high: Now reporting more than 5,100 daily.

— There have been 995,687 infections and 14,449 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

 Measures to contain the epidemic

— All vaccinated arrivals must present evidence of a completed vaccination cycle, or of recovery from Covid within 100 days alongside an initial vaccination.

Those arriving via land or sea must also present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, in Georgian, English or Russian. Children under 10 are exempt from the testing requirement.

For non-vaccinated arrivals from the countries listed above, the restrictions are tighter. They must travel direct to Georgia, with no stop-offs or transits. On arrival at the border they must present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, and must take a further PCR test on day three. They must also fill in a contact tracing form.

On December 1, Georgia introduced a “Green Pass” system. Those without the mobile phone-based app will be unable to enter venues such as hotels, restaurants, cinemas, spas and gyms.

Vaccine

— Georgia has administered at least 2,613,313 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 35.1% of the country’s population.

Situation report Republic of Moldova

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are increasing in Moldova, with 1,145 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 69% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on October 23. Average number of new infections reported each day in Moldova rises by more than 910 over the last 3 weeks, 54% of its previous peak.

— There have been 387,920 infections and 10,437 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Markets, restaurants and bars are operating usual hours, including food delivery services. Malls and commercial centres are operating usual working hours (until 10pm). Schooling is both online and in-person. Nightclubs are closed. Restaurants, cafes, theatres, cinemas and concert halls are open, but access will only be permitted upon presentation, either on paper or electronically, of one of the following documents (for persons over the age of 18):

  • a COVID-19 vaccination certificate evidencing full vaccination;
  • a negative PCR test result taken no more than 72 hours before the event;
  • a negative rapid antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before the event;
  • confirmation of the presence of COVlD-19 antibodies (serological antibodies test).The document is valid for a period of 90 days from the date of the test.

You must also carry one form of photo identification as well as your COVID-19 document such as a passport or driving license.

You must wear a mask outside at mass gatherings, and in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets, restaurants, bars and on public transport. Officials have the authority to issue fines for non-compliance. Social distancing of 1m must be observed.

 

Vaccine

— Moldova has administered at least 1,839,531 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 34.6% of the country’s population.

Situation report Ukraine

Image: Worldometer

COVID-19 cases

— Ukraine is reporting 7,426 new infections on average each day, 33% of the peak – the highest daily average reported on October 30.

— There have been 3,754,458 infections and 98,283 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Ukraine has extended the effective duration of the adaptive quarantine regime used for tracking domestic COVID-19 activity as of Dec. 30. The adaptive quarantine regime will now remain in effect until March 31, 2022. Additionally, authorities have updated the classification of regions under this system.

— Domestic Measures: A COVID-19-related nationwide state of emergency remains in effect, and authorities maintain an “adaptive quarantine” system for tracking disease activity. Under this system, each region is classified as being at either the green, yellow, orange, or red level in order of increasing transmission risk as determined by the volume of COVID-19 testing and vaccinations, local morbidity rates, and the capacity of local hospitals.

As of Dec. 30, all regions of the country are classified as yellow. No regions are currently classified as green, orange, or red.

Restrictions in orange and yellow zones include capacity limits for mass events, cultural institutions, and fitness centers, among other measures. Yellow- and orange-level restrictions do not apply if all individuals at an event or facility and at least 80 percent of staff are vaccinated against or recovered from COVID-19 or have recently tested negative for the disease. Restrictions in red zones generally include the closure of nonessential businesses and a prohibition on public gatherings. Authorities, however, allow for nonessential businesses to operate provided both personnel and customers are either fully vaccinated, recovered, or can provide a negative PCR or antigen test result no older than 72 hours.

Proof of vaccination, recovery, or a recent negative test result is required for all interregional transportation, including via buses, trains, and airplanes; such requirements do not apply for travel within a region unless specifically mandated by local authorities, as is the case in Kyiv city. Facemasks remain mandatory in enclosed public spaces and on public transport across Ukraine.

— International Travel Restrictions: Ukraine maintains tightened international entry restrictions for certain travelers. All travelers who have spent more than seven days in the last 14 days in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, and Mozambique must self-isolate for 14 days upon entry.

All non-resident foreign nationals traveling to Ukraine must have health insurance covering COVID-19 treatment and must generally present documentation indicating vaccination against or recovery from COVID-19 or proof of a negative result from a PCR or rapid antigen test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Unvaccinated travelers must also take a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of arrival or subsequently begin up to 10 days of self-isolation, which can end early after receiving a negative result. All unvaccinated foreign nationals entering Ukraine must download and install the “Vdoma” COVID-19 mobile application, which authorities use to monitor self-isolation.

Unvaccinated travelers arriving from Russia and India must undergo self-isolation for at least 14 days. There are no provisions for such travelers to end their quarantine period early.

Vaccine

– Ukraine has administered at least 29,260,691 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 33% of the country’s population.

~

Interesting reads

Bi-weekly COVID-19 Situation Report for 6 countries of the Eastern Partnership. 6 January 2022.

Within EU-funded COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for the Eastern Partnership countries AFEW International prepares regular updates on the COVID-19 developments in the region – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. What is the situation today? Please, check it here! 

You can find previous updates in the COVID Corner on our website.

As for 06.01.2022

The number of coronavirus cases per population ratio since the start of the pandemic (January 22, 2020) in the 6 countries of the EaP

Source: Sciences Po Media lab Coronavirus Country Comparator

Situation report Armenia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are decreasing in Armenia, with 41 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 2% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on November 1.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Armenia extends existing COVID-19 measures until June 20, 2022.

Domestic measures: all staff must demonstrate proof of COVID-19 vaccination to their employers or self-fund a PCR test every 14 days; some categories of person, including pregnant women, are exempt. Protective face coverings are mandatory in public spaces, including on public transport, and restrictions on gatherings remain in place. Businesses are permitted to reopen provided they maintain strict hygiene and social distancing requirements.

International travel restrictions: international flights are permitted and land borders are open; however, international arrivals via air or land must produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival or evidence of full COVID-19 vaccination. Individuals arriving without the required documentation must pay for a test on arrival and self-isolate until a negative result is confirmed.

Vaccine

— Armenia has administered at least 1,668,198 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 28.2% of the country’s population.

Situation report Azerbaijan

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are decreasing in Azerbaijan, with 439 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 11% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on December 14.

— There have been 618,918 infections and 8,409 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— A special quarantine regime is imposed in the country until 06:00, 1 March 2022. Functioning of malls and shopping centers, shops, museums and exhibition halls is permitted. Inter-city and inter-regional travel is allowed. On-site services in catering facilities are allowed from 06:00 till 00:00. Cinemas, theatres, entertainment centers in the country are functioning. COVID-19 passport is required for people above 18 to enter catering facilities, hotels, malls and large shopping centers, cinemas, theatres and entertainment centers.

Vaccine

– Azerbaijan has administered at least 11,373,965 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 56.7% of the country’s population.

Situation report Belarus

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are decreasing in Belarus, with 1,041 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 51% of the peak – the highest daily average reported on October 26.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— COVID-19-related restrictions in Belarus remain generally unchanged as of 4 January 2022 by comparison with those in effect during late November. The only substantive change in the government’s directives is that citizens arriving from abroad are no longer required to self-isolate.

Vaccine

– Belarus has administered at least 8,651,776 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 45.7% of the country’s population.

Situation report Georgia

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— Georgia is reporting 2,152 new infections on average each day, 43% of the peak – the highest daily average reported on August 18.

— There have been 945,609 infections and 14,041 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

 Measures to contain the epidemic

— All vaccinated arrivals must present evidence of a completed vaccination cycle, or of recovery from Covid within 100 days alongside an initial vaccination.

Those arriving via land or sea must also present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, in Georgian, English or Russian. Children under 10 are exempt from the testing requirement.

For non-vaccinated arrivals from the countries listed above, the restrictions are tighter. They must travel direct to Georgia, with no stop-offs or transits. On arrival at the border they must present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival, and must take a further PCR test on day three. They must also fill in a contact tracing form.

On December 1, Georgia introduced a “Green Pass” system. Those without the mobile phone-based app will be unable to enter venues such as hotels, restaurants, cinemas, spas and gyms.

Vaccine

— Georgia has administered at least 2,536,824 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 34.1% of the country’s population.

Situation report Republic of Moldova

Image: Worldometer

Cases of COVID-19

— COVID-19 infections are decreasing in Moldova, with 406 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 24% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on October 23.

— There have been 378,202 infections and 10,328 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Markets, restaurants and bars are operating usual hours, including food delivery services. Malls and commercial centres are operating usual working hours (until 10pm). Schooling is both online and in-person. Nightclubs are closed. Restaurants, cafes, theatres, cinemas and concert halls are open, but access will only be permitted upon presentation, either on paper or electronically, of one of the following documents (for persons over the age of 18):

  • a COVID-19 vaccination certificate evidencing full vaccination;
  • a negative PCR test result taken no more than 72 hours before the event;
  • a negative rapid antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before the event;
  • confirmation of the presence of COVlD-19 antibodies (serological antibodies test).The document is valid for a period of 90 days from the date of the test.

You must also carry one form of photo identification as well as your COVID-19 document such as a passport or driving license.

You must wear a mask outside at mass gatherings, and in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets, restaurants, bars and on public transport. Officials have the authority to issue fines for non-compliance. Social distancing of 1m must be observed.

Vaccine

— Moldova has administered at least 1,791,089 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 33.7% of the country’s population.

 Situation report Ukraine

Image: Worldometer

COVID-19 cases

— COVID-19 infections are decreasing in Ukraine, with 4,095 new infections reported on average each day. That’s 18% of the peak — the highest daily average reported on October 30.

— There have been 3,689,291 infections and 96,896 coronavirus-related deaths reported in the country since the pandemic began.

Measures to contain the epidemic

— Ukraine has extended the effective duration of the adaptive quarantine regime used for tracking domestic COVID-19 activity as of Dec. 30. The adaptive quarantine regime will now remain in effect until March 31, 2022. Additionally, authorities have updated the classification of regions under this system.

— Domestic Measures: A COVID-19-related nationwide state of emergency remains in effect, and authorities maintain an “adaptive quarantine” system for tracking disease activity. Under this system, each region is classified as being at either the green, yellow, orange, or red level in order of increasing transmission risk as determined by the volume of COVID-19 testing and vaccinations, local morbidity rates, and the capacity of local hospitals.

As of Dec. 30, all regions of the country are classified as yellow. No regions are currently classified as green, orange, or red.

Restrictions in orange and yellow zones include capacity limits for mass events, cultural institutions, and fitness centers, among other measures. Yellow- and orange-level restrictions do not apply if all individuals at an event or facility and at least 80 percent of staff are vaccinated against or recovered from COVID-19 or have recently tested negative for the disease. Restrictions in red zones generally include the closure of nonessential businesses and a prohibition on public gatherings. Authorities, however, allow for nonessential businesses to operate provided both personnel and customers are either fully vaccinated, recovered, or can provide a negative PCR or antigen test result no older than 72 hours.

Proof of vaccination, recovery, or a recent negative test result is required for all interregional transportation, including via buses, trains, and airplanes; such requirements do not apply for travel within a region unless specifically mandated by local authorities, as is the case in Kyiv city. Facemasks remain mandatory in enclosed public spaces and on public transport across Ukraine.

— International Travel Restrictions: Ukraine maintains tightened international entry restrictions for certain travelers. All travelers who have spent more than seven days in the last 14 days in South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Lesotho, Eswatini, and Mozambique must self-isolate for 14 days upon entry.

All non-resident foreign nationals traveling to Ukraine must have health insurance covering COVID-19 treatment and must generally present documentation indicating vaccination against or recovery from COVID-19 or proof of a negative result from a PCR or rapid antigen test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Unvaccinated travelers must also take a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of arrival or subsequently begin up to 10 days of self-isolation, which can end early after receiving a negative result. All unvaccinated foreign nationals entering Ukraine must download and install the “Vdoma” COVID-19 mobile application, which authorities use to monitor self-isolation.

Unvaccinated travelers arriving from Russia and India must undergo self-isolation for at least 14 days. There are no provisions for such travelers to end their quarantine period early.

Vaccine

– Ukraine has administered at least 28,683,086 doses of COVID vaccines so far. Assuming every person needs 2 doses, that’s enough to have vaccinated about 32.3% of the country’s population.

Interesting reads

Our project has facilitated high commitment to treatment in people, living with HIV!

Over 24000 people living with HIV are on D record in Odessa Region. Continuous anti-retroviral treatment is the most important point for overcoming the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Ukraine. Introduction of quarantine measures related to the COVID-19 pandemic has jeopardized the ability of patients to receive treatment.

Many people living in remote villages did not have the financial ability to get to a hospital or even receive therapy via post office. That is why the organization “Alternative” from Odessa (Ukraine) applied to AFEW International for a grant for their project “Prevention of ART Interruption in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic” within the framework of COVID-19 Solidarity Program for the Eastern Partnership countries.

Olga Stoyanova, Project’s Coordinator

Target Has Been Achieved!

The target of the project “Prevention of ART Interruption in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic” was to provide people living with HIV in Odessa Region with uninterrupted treatment and by doing so to maintain high commitment to ART therapy. Under the framework of this project, our social workers were mailing packages with treatment to all locations in Odessa Region. Additionally, the addressees received personal protective equipment: a medical mask and a hand sanitizer. Thus, the problem of both high adherence to therapy and prevention of COVID-19 was achieved. In total, project activities reached out to over 2000 people.

After the completion of the project, the need to allocate funds from the regional budget to send out treatment to clients in emergency situations by mail was brought up for consideration at the Intersectional Group (ISG), and then raised at the Coordination Council of local authorities. We hope it will be brought to full implementation.

Thank you for helping us!

The story of one family. Nadezhda (name has been changed). “My granddaughter and I live in a small township in Podolsk area that is 200 km away from the city of Odessa. Before the lockdown, we had to spend a lot of time and money in order to travel there to receive treatment. Since 2020, when the COVID pandemic unrolled, I hardly leave the village – I’ve got no opportunities and no money. My granddaughter has HIV, and I am her only caretaker, as both of her parents died from AIDS. In the hot summer weather, my health would not have allowed me to travel to the city to get medicines for her. I am grateful to the organization “Alternative” and its social worker who took care of us and sent the pills by mail. Thus, my granddaughter did not miss therapy. We also received masks and disinfectants. All this was absolutely free for us! Thank you very much, this project has helped us a lot”!

For Reference

The COVID-19 Regional Solidarity Program for the Eastern Partnership countries is funded by the European Union and implemented in partnership with People in Need and the Netherlands Helsinki Committee. This project aims to support civil society organizations in response to the immediate and long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Eastern Partnership countries.

 

Armenia: Call for Proposals

Penitentiary Institutions in the Republic of Armenia

The Netherlands Helsinki Committee (NHC) has launched a regional “COVID-19 Solidarity Programme 2020-2022: Call for Proposals on COVID-19 in Prisons and Mental Health Institutions” with the financial support of the European Union, and in partnership with People in Need and AFEW International.

The NHC, in cooperation with Human Rights in Mental Health (Federation Global Initiative in Psychiatry, FGIP), will deliver the activities of the Programme. This programme will support civil society organisations (CSOs) to respond to the immediate and longer-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in Eastern Partnership countries.

Objectives of the Call

NHC and FGIP seek to provide grants to CSOs to monitor the effect of COVID-19 prevention and treatment measures on the conditions of people confined to penitentiary institutions, detention and/or pre-detention centres in the Republic of Armenia. This includes the full range of relevant issues including (discontinuation of) health care, (lack of) contact with lawyers, relatives or loved ones, inclusiveness in COVID-19 vaccination programme in the country, and other related basic human rights. In addition to monitoring and reporting, the objective would also be to provide advice and assistance to stakeholders, including confined persons, personnel, relatives, lawyers, on problems they encounter in COVID-19 prevention and treatment.

Organisations (or consortia) that already have access to penitentiary institutions under a National Preventive Mechanism (NPM) of the Republic of Armenia or that through another agreement with authorities have access to these institutions are invited to submit a proposal. Applicants that do not have a formalized relationship with governmental bodies that provides access to penitentiary institutions need to prove they have a track record of obtaining reliable information based on monitoring and explain in detail how such information will be gathered.

The aim of the proposal should be to facilitate specific attention for COVID-19 related issues in closed institutions in addition to ongoing work relating to conditions in penitentiary institutions.

Selected organizations will be provided with documentation about international standards relevant to COVID-19 in closed institutions, and will have access for questions of methodology to advice from the pool of experts of NHC and FGIP on monitoring of and health care in penitentiary institutions.

Eligibility

This call for proposals is open to non-profit-making civil society organisations or consortia of non-profit-making civil society organizations with the status of a legal person, established in the Republic of Armenia. In case of consortia, the main applicant will be responsible for the overall implementation of the action.

All organizations should have a formalized relationship with respective governmental bodies that provides access to penitentiary institutions and the applicant needs to prove it has a record of working with these institutions.

Applications should provide evidence of the following:

  • Registration status as a non-profit organisation registered under national legislation
  • At least four years’ experience delivering activities in line with the proposed project
  • Experience with managing budgets of similar size

Public administration institutions, state agencies, local or regional authorities, political parties or organisations affiliated with political parties are not eligible for this call.

CSOs that applied for the LOT1 within the scope of this project (to monitor the effect of COVID-19 prevention and treatment measures on the conditions of people confined to mental health institutions) are eligible to apply.

Application Process

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Annex 1 – Application Form
  • Annex 2 – Budget
  • Registration certificate of the organization (original with an English)
  • Statute of the organisation (if possible in English)
  • Evidence of track record in similar projects
  • CVs of the project team
  • If the proposal is submitted by a consortium: an outline of the cooperation process and the division of tasks between individual members in the application form (annex 1).

Applications can be submitted in Armenian or English. All submitted applications must be signed by the head of the applicant organisation, scanned and sent electronically.

The application package should be submitted to: Covid19SP@nhc.nl

Deadline for submission of full applications is December 19, 2021. Incomplete or late applications will not be accepted.

More details about the call for proposals (English and Armenian)

Application Form, Budget and Annexes (English and Armenian)

This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union. The contents of this document are the sole responsibility of the Netherlands Helsinki Committee and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union.

Ukraine: Call for Proposals to Supply Equipment to Counter Effects of the COVID-19 in Closed Institutions: LOT 2

Psychiatric Hospitals in Ukraine

The Netherlands Helsinki Committee (NHC) has launched a regional “COVID-19 Solidarity Programme 2020-2022” with the financial support of the European Union and in partnership with People in Need and AFEW International.

The NHC, in cooperation with Human Rights in Mental Health (Federation Global Initiative in Psychiatry, FGIP), will deliver the activities of the Programme. This programme will support civil society organisations (CSOs) to respond to the immediate and longer-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in Eastern Partnership countries.

Objectives of the Call

NHC and FGIP seek to provide grants to CSOs to monitor the effect of COVID-19 prevention and treatment measures on the conditions of people confined to psychiatric hospitals in Ukraine. This includes the full range of relevant issues including (discontinuation of) health care, (lack of) contact with relatives or loved ones, inclusiveness in COVID-19 vaccination programme in the country, and other related basic human rights. In addition to monitoring and reporting, the objective would also be to provide advice and assistance to stakeholders, including confined persons, personnel, relatives, lawyers, on problems they encounter in COVID-19 prevention and treatment.

Eligibility

This call for proposals is open to non-profit-making civil society organisations or consortia of non-profit-making civil society organizations with the status of a legal person, established in Ukraine. In case of consortia, the main applicant will be responsible for the overall implementation of the action.

All organizations should have a formalized relationship with respective governmental bodies that provides access to psychiatric hospitals and the applicant needs to prove it has a record of working with these institutions.

Applications should provide evidence of the following:

  • Registration status as a non-profit organisation registered under national legislation
  • At least four years’ experience delivering activities in line with the proposed project
  • Experience with managing budgets of similar size

Public administration institutions, state agencies, local or regional authorities, political parties or organisations affiliated with political parties are not eligible for this call.

CSOs that applied for the LOT1 within the scope of this project (to monitor the effect of COVID-19 prevention and treatment measures on the conditions of people confined to mental health institutions) are eligible to apply.

Application Process

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Annex 1 – Application Form
  • Annex 2 – Budget
  • Registration certificate of the organization (original with an English translation)
  • Statute of the organisation (if possible in English)
  • Evidence of track record in similar projects
  • CVs of the project team
  • If the proposal is submitted by a consortium: an outline of the cooperation process and the division of tasks between individual members in the application form (annex 1).

Applications can be submitted in Ukrainian or English. All submitted applications must be signed by the head of the applicant organisation, scanned and sent electronically.

The application package should be submitted to: Covid19SP@nhc.nl

Deadline for submission of full applications is December 19, 2021. Incomplete or late applications will not be accepted.

More details about the call for proposals (English and Ukrainian)

Application Form, Budget and Annexes (English and Ukrainian)

This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union. The contents of this document are the sole responsibility of the Netherlands Helsinki Committee and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union.

Ensuring sustainable and safe implementation of HIV/AIDS programmes amid COVID-19 in Armenia

A project “Ensuring sustainable and safe implementation of HIV/AIDS programmes amid COVID-19”of Armenian organization New Generation was financed by AFEW International within EU-funded COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for the Eastern Partnership countries.

On the 31 of May 2021 the project was finished, providing the social, legal, psychological support to over 250 beneficiaries who had suffered from the COVID-19 pandemic related emergency situation and crisis in Armenia.

Alina Mirzoyan, coordinator of human rights projects at New Generation Humanitarian NGO

Our project was proposed to facilitate access to HIV services, make the provision of services safer and provide social and psychological support to vulnerable groups of population who had remained double vulnerable helpless, jobless, stigmatized and without state support in the COVID-19 pandemic situation in Armenia. As a result, in total we helped 250 representatives of vulnerable groups of the country.

During implementation of the project, it was very important for us to give social assistance to LGBT people. Many of them lost jobs, since many of them work in service sector especially affected by COVID-19. As LGBT people are usually considered as second members of the society,  employers often  even do not register them as workers. That’s why within the frames of project legal assistance complaints and official letters were submitted to different state institutions to help these people.

Within this program, we also gave legal and psychological assistance to people whose rights have been violated, who have been subjected to discrimination by their own family members. The program helped to assist them with finding temporary shelters and financial support, so they could find some temporary shelter until they have a job or other financial income.

Within these years we have achieved a lot of improvement in cooperation with the state in terms of providing HIV prevention services to vulnerable groups of the society. Nowadays we are cooperating with the Ministry of Health of Armenia about HIV prevention services to trans* people, MSM and commercial sex workers. These programs, which are implemented by our NGO in Armenia, are supported by the Ministry of Health with the funds provided by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and also in cooperation with the National Center for Infectious Diseases. So, we can say that there is cooperation with state institutions in terms of HIV services.

Our organization is one of the largest community-based NGOs in Armenia, with 70 outreach workers from the beneficiary communities. Only in 2020, our NGO provided HIV services to 8687 beneficiaries, legal aid to 503 beneficiaries, psychological assistance to 90 beneficiaries, shelter and social assistance to 700 beneficiaries.

I believe that step-by-step work and advocacy can make great changes in our country.

Our NGO currently can’t provide social and psychological assistance to its beneficiaries due to the unavailability of resources. But the needs assessment has shown that there is still requirement for social support among the key populations, that’s why we continue fundraising to ensure the social and psychological support for our beneficiaries, especially considering that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has not mitigated yet in the country.

For reference

The regional COVID-19 Solidarity Program in the Eastern Partnership countries is financially supported by the European Union and is implemented in partnership with People in Need and the Netherlands Helsinki Committee.  This project aims to support community-based organizations to respond to the immediate and longer-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Eastern Partnership countries.

 

 

COVID-19 situation quarterly report in the six countries of the Eastern Partnership July – September 2021

In the framework of the EU COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for Eastern Partnership, AFEW International, People in Need (PIN) and the Netherlands Helsinki Committee (NHC) joined forces to propose a set of interventions in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and contribute towards longer-term socio-economic resilience of vulnerable groups.

One of the activities in this project is the collection of information on the epidemiology of COVID-19, the measures taken by local governments to contain the epidemic and information on access to health services. This report doesn’t give conclusions or recommendations for the next steps; the report functions as an information resource as support for the development of (new) interventions.

This report gives an overview of the period 1 July – 30 September 2021, the fourth quarter of the implementation period of the project. Such a report will be produced for every quarter of the project duration.

For this report the following sources are used:
— WHO Health System Response Monitor (HSRM);
— Official sources on the coronavirus situation in the countries;
— Reports on the COVID-19 situation prepared by the UNICEF, UN, OECD, International Partnership for Human Rights
(IPHR);
— Global news agencies;
— Local independent media.

Read the report

Access to medical services for key populations during pandemic in Moldova

Liudmila Marandici, project manager “Initiativa Pozitiva”, Alina Kozhakar, head of the PLHIV department “Initiativa Pozitiva”, Valeria Fulga, project and grant officer AFEW International

During the COVID-19 pandemic in Moldova, there was a significant decrease in access to testing and treatment for chronic diseases, such as viral hepatitis, among key populations. To ensure access to medical services for people from these groups, the organisation ‘Initiativa Pozitiva’ from Moldova applied to AFEW International for a grant from the EU-funded  COVID-19 Solidarity Programme for the Eastern Partnership countries.

Liudmila Marandici, project manager at “Initiativa Pozitiva”

Thanks to the funding, we helped people who use psychoactive substances to buy a health insurance and thus make sure that they have an access to medical care for 2021. Buying the insurance also allowed them to get therapy for Hepatitis C and the necessary tests for free. For those who couldn’t get health insurance directly, we found an alternative way to get insurance by referring them to special services. All of our beneficiaries were tested for Hepatitis C and B with their consent. In case of a positive result, we accompanied those people to get through all stages of treatment. We showed people that if they want, they can be recovered, they just need help, because they lack discipline and knowledge about patients’ rights. Some of our clients have already completed treatment for hepatitis, and by their example they showed to other people that everything is possible.

It is necessary to add, that the project allowed us to see the reality of medical services in Moldova. Our specialists have identified constant violations of patients’ rights. Raising awareness of people rights and fighting discrimination was not the only goal of this project, with its help many beneficiaries increased their knowledge of their rights. In the future, we will use the experience gained in this project in our work.

For reference

The regional COVID-19 Solidarity Program in the Eastern Partnership countries is financially supported by the European Union and is implemented in partnership with People in Need and the Netherlands Helsinki Committee.  This project aims to support community-based organizations to respond to the immediate and longer-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Eastern Partnership countries.