State of the world’s nursing 2020

On the 7 of April, the World Health Day, WHO launched of the first ever State of the World’s Nursing Report 2020.

The State of the world’s nursing 2020 report provides the latest, most up-to-date evidence on and policy options for the global nursing workforce. It also presents a compelling case for considerable – yet feasible – investment in nursing education, jobs, and leadership.

Read report here

Mental Health and Psychosocial Considerations During COVID-19 Outbreak

WHO and public health authorities around the world are acting to contain the COVID-19 outbreak. However, this time of crisis is generating stress in the population. WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Use developed mental health considerations as messages targeting different groups to support for mental and psychosocial well-being during COVID-19 outbreak.

General population
1. COVID-19 has and is likely to affect people from many countries, in many geographical locations. Do not attach it to any ethnicity or nationality. Be empathetic to all those who are affected, in and from any country. People who are affected by Covid-19 have not done anything wrong, and they deserve our support, compassion and kindness.
2. Do not refer to people with the disease as “COVID-19 cases”, “victims” “COVID-19 families” or the “diseased”. They are “people who have COVID-19”, “people who are being treated for COVID-19”, “people who are recovering from COVID-19” and after recovering from COVID-19 their life will go on with their jobs, families and loved ones. It is important to separate a person from having an identity defined by COVID-19, to reduce stigma.
3. Minimize watching, reading or listening to news that causes you to feel anxious or distressed; seek information only from trusted sources and mainly to take practical steps to prepare your plans and protect yourself and loved ones. Seek information updates at specific times during the day, once or twice. The sudden and near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel worried. Get the facts; not the rumors and misinformation. Gather information at regular intervals, from WHO website and local health authorities platforms, in order to help you distinguish facts from rumors. Facts can help to minimize fears.
4. Protect yourself and be supportive to others. Assisting others in their time of need can benefit the person receiving support as well as the helper. For example, check-in by phone on neighbors or people in your community who may need some extra assistance. Working together as one community can help to create solidarity in addressing Covid-19 together.
5. Find opportunities to amplify positive and hopeful stories and positive images of local people who have experienced COVID-19. For example, stories of people who have recovered or who have supported a loved one and are willing to share their experience.
6. Honor caretakers and healthcare workers supporting people affected with COVID-19 in your community. Acknowledge the role they play to save lives and keep your loved ones safe.

Healthcare workers
7. For health workers, feeling under pressure is a likely experience for you and many of your health worker colleagues. It is quite normal to be feeling this way in the current situation. Stress and the feelings associated with it are by no means a reflection that you cannot do your job or that you are weak. Managing your mental health and psychosocial wellbeing during this time is as important as managing your physical health.
8. Take care of yourself at this time. Try and use helpful coping strategies such as ensuring sufficient rest and respite during work or between shifts, eat sufficient and healthy food, engage in physical activity, and stay in contact with family and friends. Avoid using unhelpful coping strategies such as tobacco, alcohol or other drugs. In the long term, these can worsen your mental and physical wellbeing. This is a unique and unprecedent scenario for many workers, particularly if they have not been involved in similar responses. Even so, using strategies that have worked for you in the past to manage times of stress can benefit you now. You are most likely to know how to de-stress and you should not be hesitant in keeping yourself psychologically well. This is not a sprint; it’s a marathon.
9. Some healthcare workers may unfortunately experience avoidance by their family or community due to stigma or fear. This can make an already challenging situation far more difficult. If possible, staying connected with your loved ones including through digital methods is one way to maintain contact. Turn to your colleagues, your manager or other trusted persons for social support- your colleagues may be having similar experiences to you.
10. Use understandable ways to share messages with people with intellectual, cognitive and psychosocial disabilities. Forms of communication that do not rely solely on written information should be utilized If you are a team leader or manager in a health facility.
11. Know how to provide support to, for people who are affected with COVID-19 and know how to link them with available resources. This is especially important for those who require mental health and psychosocial support. The stigma associated with mental health problems may cause reluctance to seek support for both COVID-19 and mental health conditions. The mhGAP Humanitarian Intervention Guide includes clinical guidance for addressing priority mental health conditions and is designed for use by general health workers.

Team leaders or managers in health facility
12. Keeping all staff protected from chronic stress and poor mental health during this response means that they will have a better capacity to fulfil their roles. Be sure to keep in mind that the current situation will not go away overnight and you should focus on longer term occupational capacity rather than repeated short-term crisis responses.
13. Ensure good quality communication and accurate information updates are provided to all staff. Rotate workers from higher-stress to lower-stress functions. Partner inexperienced workers with their more experienced colleagues. The buddy system helps to provide support, monitor stress and reinforce safety procedures. Ensure that outreach personnel enter the community in pairs. Initiate, encourage and monitor work breaks. Implement flexible schedules for workers who are directly impacted or have a family member impacted by a stressful event. Ensure you build in time for colleagues to provide social support to each other.
14. If you are a team leader or manager in a health facility, facilitate access to, and ensure staff are aware of where they can access mental health and psychosocial support services. Managers and team leaders are also facing similar stressors as their staff, and potentially additional pressure in the level of responsibility of their role. It is important that the above provisions and strategies are in place for both workers and managers, and that managers can be a role-model of self-care strategies to mitigate stress.
15. Orient responders, including nurses, ambulance drivers, volunteers, case identifiers, teachers and community leaders and workers in quarantine sites, on how to provide basic emotional and practical support to affected people using psychological first aid
16. Manage urgent mental health and neurological complaints (e.g. delirium, psychosis, severe anxiety or depression) within emergency or general health care facilities. Appropriate trained and qualified staff may need to be deployed to these locations when time permits, general health care staff capacity in mental health and psychosocial support should be increased (see mhGAP Humanitarian Intervention Guide)
17. Ensure availability of essential, generic psychotropic medications at all levels of health care. People living with long-term mental health conditions or epileptic seizures will need uninterrupted access to their medication, and sudden discontinuation should be avoided.

Care providers for children
18. Help children find positive ways to express feelings such as fear and sadness. Every child has their own way to express emotions. Sometimes engaging in a creative activity, such as playing, and drawing can facilitate this process. Children feel relieved if they can express and communicate their feelings in a safe and supportive environment.
19. Keep children close to their parents and family, if considered safe for the child, and avoid separating children and their caregivers as much as possible. If a child needs to be separated from their primary caregiver, ensure that appropriate alternative care is provided and that a social worker, or equivalent, will regularly follow up on the child. Further, ensure that during periods of separation, regular contact with parents and caregivers is maintained, such as twice-daily scheduled phone or video calls or other age-appropriate communication (e.g., social media depending on the age of the child).
20. Maintain familiar routines in daily life as much as possible, or create new routines, especially if children must stay at home. Provide engaging age appropriate activities for children, including activities for their learning. As much as possible, encourage children to continue to play and socialize with others, even if only within the family when advised to restrict social contract.
21. During times of stress and crisis, it is common for children to seek more attachment and be more demanding on parents. Discuss COVID-19 with your children using honest and age-appropriate way. If your children have concerns, addressing those together may ease their anxiety. Children will observe adults’ behaviors and emotions for cues on how to manage their own emotions during difficult times. Additional advice available here
Older adults, care providers and people with underlying health conditions
22. Older adults, especially in isolation and those with cognitive decline/dementia, may become more anxious, angry, stressed, agitated, and withdrawn during the outbreak/while in quarantine. Provide practical and emotional support through informal networks (families) and health professionals.
23. Share simple facts about what is going on and give clear information about how to reduce risk of infection in words older people with/without cognitive impairment can understand. Repeat the information whenever necessary. Instructions need to be communicated in a clear, concise, respectful and patient way. It may also be helpful for information to be displayed in writing or pictures. Engage their family and other support networks in providing information and helping them practice prevention measures (e.g. handwashing etc.)
24. If you have an underlying health condition, make sure to have access to any medications that you are currently using. Activate your social contacts to provide you with assistance, if needed.
25. Be prepared and know in advance where and how to get practical help if needed, like calling a Taxi, having food delivered and requesting medical care. Make sure you have up to 2 weeks of all your regular medicines that you may require.
26. Learn simple daily physical exercises to perform at home, in quarantine or isolation to maintain mobility and reduce boredom.
27. Keep regular routines and schedules as much as possible or help create new ones in a new environment, including regular exercising, cleaning, daily chores, singing, painting or other activities. Help others, through peer support, neighbor checking, and childcare for medical personnel restricted in hospitals fighting against COVID-19 when safe to do so. in accordance with previous ones. Keep regular contact with loved ones (e.g. via phone or other accesses).

People in isolation
28. Stay connected and maintain your social networks. Even when isolated, try as much as possible to keep your personal daily routines or create new routines. If health authorities have recommended limiting your physical social contact to contain the outbreak, you can stay connected via e-mail, social media, video conference and telephone.
29. During times of stress, pay attention to your own needs and feelings. Engage in healthy activities that you enjoy and find relaxing. Exercise regularly, keep regular sleep routines and eat healthy food. Keep things in perspective. Public health agencies and experts in all countries are working on the outbreak to ensure the availability of the best care to those affected.
30. A near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel anxious or distressed. Seek information updates and practical guidance at specific times during the day from health professionals and WHO website and avoid listening to or following rumors that make you feel uncomfortable.

So many women, so many fates

 

In Tajikistan, there is an increase in the proportion of sexual transmission of HIV infection from year to year and an increase in the number of women of reproductive age among those registered with the diagnosis established for the first time. That is why in 2019 the public organization “Tajik network of women living with HIV” (TNW+) with the support of AFEW International in the framework of Bridging the Gaps project conducted a study “Key problems of sexual and reproductive health of women living with HIV in Tajikistan through the prism of human rights”.

Before the International Women’s Day on 8 March, Tahmina Khaydarova, head of TNW+ discussed with AFEW International HIV, sex, violence and gender inequality in Tajikistan.

What does sex mean for men and women in Tajikistan?

For men, sex is an opportunity to satisfy their desire, and only then is it a way of making children. For women, sex is almost always a way of making children and extending the family. As a rule, women in Tajikistan cannot talk about sex and take the initiative in sexual relations, as it is considered to be debauchery.

Generally speaking, the sexuality in Tajikistan is highly exposed to traditional gender stereotypes. It is not common here to discuss sexual relations, either in the family or in society. Some people talk about it with their partners, doctors, etc. But even if they do that that they do not really understand the meaning and significance of the concepts of “sex” and “sexual relations” and most often talk about contraception, methods of protection against unwanted pregnancy, hygiene, etc. But not more.

Does it happen because of national traditions and religion?

Yes, in many ways. However, Islam is a religion of peace and good. Islam does not talk about the abuse of women, but there are other factors that affect women’s lives. These are stereotypes, which can be connected with religion.

One of them is “a woman is obliged to take care of her husband and all members of his family, to be obedient and kind”. Therefore, girls have been brought up in a spirit of obedience since childhood. Women themselves think that men’s interests come first. One of the features of families in the republic, especially in villages, is the predominance of extended families, where several generations of adults and children live in the same house – parents, their adult sons/daughters already married, grandparents, adult sisters or brothers. As a consequence, relatives constantly interfere in the husband and wife relationship.

In the family, girls are taught to be housewives, in most cases have no education, especially in villages, and after marriage the girl becomes very dependent on her partner and family members. Without the permission of her elders and husband, a woman has no right to leave her home and receive information about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) if she wants. A woman must stand one step behind the man in everything: in decision-making, in expressing her opinion. A woman should listen to her husband’s words, she should keep silence, this is respect. It is also rare for women to be able to decide for themselves when, how and with whom to have sex, how many children to have, etc.

At the same time, sexual violence from an intimate partner increases the risk of HIV infection. During our survey, we heard from the respondents reasoning that non-consensual sexual intercourse is a normal phenomenon, and so it should be in the family, “This is your husband: if he wants to do something then you should obey. He’s young, and that’s why you have to satisfy his desires!”

Inequality between men and women in Tajikistan is developed not only in private life, but also in public life, isn’t it?

Yes, gender inequality is one of the problems hindering sustainable development in Tajikistan. Inequality is everywhere – in access to all types of tangible and intangible resources (property, land, finance, credit, education, etc.); in decision-making in all spheres and participation in political life, and violence against women.

Why do women tolerate violence?

Because it fits within the established system of gender inequality in Tajikistan. Men provide for women, control family relations, and therefore can do, in fact, whatever they want.

But the saddest thing is that society does not sufficiently understand the importance of this problem. It is convinced that domestic violence is a private matter. It is considered that the manifestation of abuse of wife, daughter-in-law, sister, etc. or constant control over their life and behavior is not violence but a norm. At the same time, it is widely believed that a woman is to blame if her husband or his relatives use physical force against her. There are many supporters of this opinion among young people, women themselves, and especially among their mothers-in-law. Therefore, in my opinion, special attention should be drawn to solving the problems of relations between mother-in-law and daughter-in-law, the relationship to the wives of migrant workers during the period when their husbands are outside the country, early and forced marriages, etc.

Are women with HIV more vulnerable?  

Definitely! Despite the fact that very often the source of HIV infection for a woman is her husband, she is subjected to violence and discrimination by her husband and his relatives. One woman said that her husband infected her, but did not consider himself guilty. Sometimes he closed the house and left his wife without food, hungry and helpless. One day he even tied her to a pole with a rope and beat her up, and then left for two days. After this she went to her parents, where she was also discriminated.

Why are women with HIV afraid to visit doctors?

Practice shows that those who go to the AIDS centre receive quality care and many are happy with it, including me. However, the main challenges for women are when they go to other health care facilities (for surgery or dentists), including primary health care (PHC). In these facilities women living with HIV (WLHIV) are most likely to experience discrimination against themselves. During focus groups, there were a lot of situations when health care workers refused to provide medical assistance to WLHIV and disclosed their status. Most of these cases were in maternity hospitals, dental clinics and during other surgeries. Therefore, most HIV-positive women are afraid to disclose their status and do not seek services from health care institutions, including primary health care services in their place of residence.

Have you talked to these doctors? What do they say about discrimination against people living with HIV?

We haven’t interviewed the health workers. However, many women believe that the reasons are in the lack of preparedness of health workers to work with PLHIV, as well as the low level of knowledge about HIV among staff. One woman, who went to the clinic, told doctors about her status. They immediately refused her services. The woman said it was a violation of her constitutional rights. But doctors said that she was ill and they could not help her anymore. Just imagine – that’s what the doctors said!

Besides in Tajikistan there is not good medical personnel who have experience working with PLHIV. A lot of professionals are leaving our country.

Let’s imagine – a woman found out about her status, she is ready to be examined, receive treatment and do everything that doctors say. Can she face any obstacles even in this case?

An antiretroviral therapy (ART) in our country is bought from the Global Fund, so there are virtually no interruptions. If a person wants to take ART, he or she can get it at all AIDS centers. But according to WHO’s recommendations, people living with HIV are assigned to PHC services and according to these requirements a person has to get the service at home. Due to the fact that in rural areas and small towns and districts everybody practically knows each other, PLHIV are afraid of disclosing their status. So there is a possibility that they will not apply to these services locally for ART services.

How difficult is it for women to accept their status?

More often it depends on their level of awareness and education – they might not know anything about HIV or have distorted information about the virus. Because HIV does not show strong symptoms in the early stages, women think that they are not sick and that the virus does not affect them. Also, accepting a diagnosis depends on a specialist working with the woman, conducting pre-test and post-test counselling.

Do you plan to use the results of your research in future work?

At the moment, the country is developing a “National Program to combat HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Republic of Tajikistan for the period 2021-2025”, and we have joined the working group on ART treatment and prevention of stigma and discrimination against PLHIV. As part of this platform, we are actively promoting the recommendations in our report.

At the same time, the research results helped us to identify and understand a number of issues, which we have not always paid due attention to before. Therefore, we will use this information in our daily work.

You can find the research here

 

Status report on prison health in the WHO European Region

WHO HIPP has launched the Status report on prison health in the WHO European Region.

This report presents an analysis of data collected on the health status of people in prison and prison health systems for 39 countries in the WHO European Region. The Health in Prisons European Database (HIPED) survey collected data from Member States between 2016 and 2017 to enable monitoring and surveillance of health in prisons. The aim of this report is to provide an indication of the current status of prison health in the European Region and highlight areas of prison health policy that should better be aligned to WHO guidance.

The document presents data and recommendations under the following headings: prison population statistics, prison health-care systems, prison environment, risk factors for ill health, disease screening on admission, prevention of infection, treatment and mortality. These data, alongside WHO guidance on health in prison, will help to inform and influence policy-makers to improve the health outcomes of people in prison.

The report is now live on the WHO website: http://www.euro.who.int/en/status-report-on-prison-health.

Prison Health Infographic ENG

Health in prisons: fact sheets for 38 European countries (2019)

 

 

Good practices of intersectoral collaboration for HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis

The WHO Regional Office for Europe is collecting examples of good practices of intersectoral collaboration for HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis for publication in a dedicated compendium.

This compendium will include examples of actions undertaken by sectors outside the health sector, possibly (but not necessarily) in collaboration with the health sector. The practices should be aimed at improving the outcomes or the determinants of the HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis epidemics, as encouraged by the UN Common Position on ending HIV, TB and viral hepatitis through intersectoral collaboration. They should also be accompanied by impact evaluations and credible monitoring mechanisms or research.

The above-mentioned UN Common Position was developed with an inclusive and consultative process to identify shared principles and key actionable areas within and beyond the health sector to address HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis in Europe and central Asia. It was successfully launched at a side event to the UNGA in New York in November 2018 and subsequently distributed within UN system to all UN Resident Coordinators of the region.

The good practices must be submitted in either English or Russian using the form provided below. All submissions will be reviewed by the WHO Regional Office for Europe against the following criteria: relevance, sustainability, efficiency and ethical appropriateness. The authorship of each good practice will be highlighted in the compendium, which is expected to be published in 2020.

The deadline for submission is 18 November 2019. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact daram@who.int. 

Conclusions of the WHO International Meeting on Prisons and Health

People in prison have higher rates of drug use and injecting than the general population, and people with drug-related problems make up a significant proportion of people in prison. Among high-risk drug users in the community, many will have repeat experience of prison. The likelihood of having contracted an infectious disease is higher among high-risk drug users with a prison history than among those who have never been incarcerated, and the risk of overdose death in the immediate period after release from prison is high.

Such were the talks during the World Health Organization (WHO) international meeting on prisons and health, held in Lisbon, Portugal, on 11–12 December 2017. The meeting participants proposed some conclusions for wider dissemination to all those who could improve the current position worldwide with respect to drugs and drug-related harms in prison, which continue to challenge prison systems and the wider community:

Taking note of the current facts and figures regarding drugs and drug-related harms in prisons worldwide and the high rate of post-release mortality, as presented to the meeting by acknowledged international experts,

Based on the evidence and experience of recognized experts in addressing drugs in prisons and their related harms, such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis (TB), as well as mental health problems,

Justified by the available evidence on effective harm-reduction measures, encouraged by the proven beneficial results obtained from initiatives such as opioid substitution treatment in prison and overdose prevention before release in other countries in the world,

Aware of the potential for prisons to contribute to global public health protection and hence to a reduction of health inequalities by allowing opportunities to intervene in a vulnerable and high disease-burdened population which would impact on wider community health outcomes,

Understanding that effective prevention depends on early recognition of those at risk at all stages of the criminal justice system,

Emphasizing the fact that drug treatment in prisons must not be isolated from health services available in the community,

Recognizing the significantly higher level of tobacco-smoking behaviour among people in prison and the opportunity to support smoking cessation in prison settings,

Considering the health and economic burden of alcohol-related violence and the potential of prison settings for the delivery of effective alcohol interventions to achieve better health and rehabilitation outcomes for prisoners,

Acknowledging the standards set out in the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (also known as the Nelson Mandela Rules), including Rule 24, on providing the same standards of health care in the prison setting as in the community and ensuring continuity between the two, and Rule 25, on paying particular attention to addressing health care needs that may hamper rehabilitation,

This meeting recognized the need for consideration of the following measures, programmes and guidelines aimed to reduce drug use and its associated harms in prison and invites policy-makers, health and justice professionals, and prison administrators to:

  • Implement a “whole-of-government approach” to prison health care, ensuring that the health and social care needs of people in prisons are considered in all policies, taking account of the need for integration between prison health and wider public health and social care systems, and recognizing prisons as a setting in which to address health inequalities, improve health and thereby reduce reoffending;
  • Operate within a framework of equivalence of health care outcomes between prison and community based on need and the requirement for continuity of care between community and prison;
  • Treat the person as a whole, including psychosocial support as well as effective pharmacological treatment, recognizing that drug treatment should take account of wider health and social care issues;
  • Ensure that service design is informed by research evidence and that service delivery is evaluated by audit and/or appropriate implementation data that take into account the prison setting and the transition into the community from custody, requiring multiagency partnership work and a systems leadership approach to health;
  • Develop and agree minimum staffing levels (both healthcare and custodial staff) and skill mix; ensure appropriate training and professional development for all staff to assure improvements in service delivery, acknowledging the challenges of working in a prison setting and the opportunities for all staff to impact on rehabilitation and reducing recidivism;
  • Encourage use of the United Nations comprehensive package of services to address HIV, TB, and viral hepatitis B and C; and undertake prison reform measures to improve living and working conditions, and broader criminal justice reforms to develop, adopt and implement alternatives to conviction or punishment and to reduce the excessive use of pre-trial detention.

The World Health Organization (WHO) international meeting on prisons and health, held in Lisbon, Portugal, on 11–12 December 2017, brought together more than 100 experts in the field of prison and public health from 30 countries worldwide; besides the WHO Regional Office for Europe, several other international and European agencies were represented, including the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), the Council of Europe’s Pompidou Group, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Justice of Portugal; support was provided by Public Health England (PHE), the UK Collaborating Centre for the WHO Health in Prisons Programme (HIPP).

Source: WHO

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis on the Rise in Eastern Europe

Author: Ingrid Hein

An epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is mounting in Eastern Europe, and without intervention on multiple fronts there is little hope the spread will slow. For several years, we have been hearing that there is “a need for urgent action,” said Daria Podlekareva, MD, PhD, from Rigshospitalet at the University of Copenhagen. It needs to be addressed now, she told Medscape Medical News.

However, cultural and political issues mean that it is “not always easy to adopt international guidelines or initiate research projects,” she said at the International AIDS Society 2017 Conference in Paris.

“It’s difficult to go into Eastern Europe and initiate projects and do studies,” she explained. “Some Eastern Europe countries are still behind an iron wall.”

It can be easier to conduct research into infectious disease in other places — even African countries — than in most formerly Soviet Union countries. To help curb the epidemic in Eastern Europe, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Stop TB Partnership, and the European Union should collaborate to encourage governments to recognize TB as a public health emergency and to implement international programs and standards of care, said Dr Podlekareva.

Eastern Europe Is a “Perfect Storm” for TB

TB continues to be a major public health issue, according to the 2017 WHO report — Tuberculosis Surveillance and Monitoring Report in Europe 2017 — released in March. Most of the 323,000 new TB cases and the 32,000 deaths due to TB in the WHO European Region in 2015 occurred in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Eastern Europe is a “perfect storm” for the spread of TB because it has high rates of incarceration, HIV infection, and injection drug use, and it has disintegrated healthcare systems, suboptimal TB diagnosis and treatment, and poor adherence rates, Dr Podlekareva said.

In addition, nearly half of all TB cases are multidrug-resistant, which requires longer, more expensive treatment than drug-susceptible TB, and leads to more adverse effects. Treatment is also less accessible in the region.

And because rates of HIV infection are on the rise in Eastern Europe, where antiretroviral therapy coverage is low, the fast progression of immunosuppression leads to increases in the rate of TB and HIV coinfection.

More Likely to Die From TB in Eastern Europe

In an international cohort study on the management of concurrent HIV and TB, Dr Podlekareva and her colleagues found that TB-related deaths were significantly more common in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe or Latin America (Lancet HIV2016;3:e120-e131).

In that study, 1406 consecutive HIV-positive patients aged 16 years or older with a tuberculosis diagnosis were followed up for 12 months at one of 62 HIV and tuberculosis clinics in 19 countries.

The prognosis was far worse for the 834 patients treated in Eastern Europe than for the 317 treated in Western Europe or the 255 treated in Latin America.

Of the 264 (19%) deaths in the study cohort, 188 (71%) were related to tuberculosis.

Cause of Death Eastern Europe, % Western Europe, % Latin America, % P-Value
All 29 4 11 <.0001
TB 23 1 4 <.0001
 “Latin America and Eastern Europe have comparable economies, as middle-or poor-resource settings,” Dr Podlekareva said. But “Latin American patients did better — much better — than the Eastern European patients.”

In Eastern Europe, diagnosis is often made on the basis of clinical judgment, not laboratory confirmation, she pointed out. And treatment is often suboptimal, including very few active drugs. Moreover, disintegrated healthcare systems in Eastern Europe are detrimental to treatment, and care centers for TB and HIV are not combined. Plus, opiate-substitution therapy — an effective treatment for drug dependence — is limited or prohibited in most regions.

“Nearly 40% of our cohort had multidrug-resistant TB,” Dr Podlekareva reported.

Eastern Europe does not have to invent its own solutions; it can adopt “what we already know,” she told Medscape Medical News. Experience from the 1980s HIV epidemic in Western countries can be a guide. There are thousands of publications on the strategies and standards of care that work.

Prisons and Drugs Contribute

In Russia, illicit drug use is a criminal offense, and “methadone treatment is prohibited,” Dr Podlekareva said. “In Eastern European countries, like the Ukraine and Belarus, there are some drug-treatment programs, but they are not widely used as a standard of care.”

With no methadone support and very few social supports for injection drug users, access to treatment, adherence, and retention in care are a challenge.

Clinicians need to ramp up their efforts to convince patients to get treated. “There is a need for clinicians to be more willing to work together, to support these patients,” she said. “When we ask why a patient is not on antiretroviral therapy, they say the patient refused it, but I think it’s the clinician’s task to convince the patient.”

When injection drug users are thrown in jail, as they are in Russia, TB transmission proliferates, Dr Podlekareva explained. A previous study showed that intrapopulation transmission in prisons, population-to-prison transmission, intraprison transmission, and prison-to-population transmission have driven overall population-level differences in TB incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates in countries of the former Soviet Union (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.2008;105:13280-13285. 

She is not alone in her assessment. “The problem in Eastern Europe will not go away, especially multidrug-resistant TB, if the infrastructure is not improved,” said Christoph Lange, MD, from the tuberculosis unit of the German Center for Infection Research and Research Center Borstel in Germany.

“Patients have been getting treatment on and off,” so new strains of multidrug-resistant TB are emerging, he told Medscape Medical News. “People are now getting infected with drug-resistant strains,” and most Eastern European countries are not equipped to treat multidrug-resistant TB.

Dr Lange said that in the past year he has seen five Armenian patients with multidrug-resistant TB looking for treatment at his clinic. He referred to them as “health-seeking migrants,” and said, “we expect to see more.”

“The number of people with drug-resistant TB is increasing more than 20% every year,” he reported. The current targets of elimination are not credible and they don’t work under the current circumstances; health organizations and governments have to acknowledge that.

“Instead of having the goal of elimination, we need to work toward low incidence,” Dr Lange said. “We have to redefine our goals and address what is most endangering public health.”

Drs Podlekareva and Lange have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Source: International AIDS Society (IAS) 2017 Conference. Presented July 2017.

PrEP: effective and empowering

Author: Marieke Bak

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a new HIV prevention method that consists of a daily pill taken by HIV-negative people to reduce their risk of becoming infected with HIV. PrEP is highly effective in preventing HIV transmission, as scientific research shows. A large international study among gay men and transgender women, the so-called iPrEx trial suggested that PrEP can reduce the risk of HIV infection by at least 92% when the pills are taken consistently. PrEP is also effective when used by heterosexual men and women, as well as by people who inject drugs.

Although PrEP is more expensive than other HIV prevention methods, it can be a cost-effective tool, especially when delivered to people at high risk of HIV. By preventing the costs of lifetime HIV treatment, PrEP may even lead to healthcare savings, especially when the drug patents expire and the cost drops.

Moreover, PrEP is the first method of HIV prevention that is directly under the control of the at-risk individual. This is in contrast with treatment as prevention (TasP), which is dependent upon partners’ HIV treatment adherence to ensure suppressed viral load. Besides, because PrEP separates the act of prevention from the sexual encounter, it can be used without sexual partners knowing and provides additional protection when condoms are not used consistently.

The World Health Organization now recommends that PrEP should be offered as a choice to key populations affected by HIV as well as to anyone else at substantial risk of HIV infection.

TRANSFORMING HIV INFECTION

PrEP is a pill consisting of anti-retroviral drugs that needs to be taken every day in order to be effective. Currently, the only drug approved for use as PrEP is sold by Gilead Sciences and is called Truvada, which consists of a combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine (TDF/FTC). Truvada was first approved for prevention in 2012 in the United States of America.

In contrast to PEP, or post-exposure prophylaxis, PrEP is taken before exposure to HIV to prevent any possible transmission. PrEP works by blocking an enzyme called HIV reverse transcriptase, thereby preventing HIV from establishing itself in the body. While PEP can be thought of as a “morning-after pill” for HIV prevention, PrEP can be compared to the contraceptive pill that is taken every day. Similarly, PrEP may transform HIV infection just like the pill transformed family planning.

The most common side effects of Truvada for PrEP are nausea, vomiting, dizziness, headache and fatigue, although these symptoms usually resolve within a few weeks. Some people in trials also experienced small changes in kidney function or a decrease in bone mineral density. An updated version of Truvada was created that contains a new form of tenofovir, which is thought to be safer for bones and kidneys. At the moment, the so-called “Discover study”, is being set up in North America and Europe to investigate the new PrEP medicine called Descovy.

By the way, PrEP does not protect from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Fears that PrEP might be used as a “party drug” exist. However, in the iPrEx study as well as in a meta-analysis by the World Health Organisation, it was shown that PrEP does not lead to an increase in the number of STDs and has no effect on condom use. Rather, PrEP reduces the fear and anxiety that often comes with sexual activity for those at high risk of HIV.

However, because PrEP is not 100% effective and because it does not protect from STDs, it should not be used as a standalone prevention method. According to WHO guidance, PrEP should be offered as part of so-called “combination prevention” which includes the use of condoms as well as regular follow-ups and HIV testing.

PREP IN EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA

Despite the recommendation to offer PrEP to people at high risk of HIV infection, the global availability of PrEP remains limited. The PrEP target set by UNAIDS in their strategy on ending the HIV pandemic is to get three million people on PrEP by 2020. However, only 2% of this target had been reached in June 2016.

At the moment, Truvada for PrEP has been approved in the United States, Canada, Australia, Peru, South Africa, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Israel, and the European Union. Approval is pending in Brazil and Thailand. In the European Union, PrEP has been approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) although the implementation of PrEP programmes is the responsibility of each member state separately. To date, only France and Norway have made PrEP available as part of their healthcare system. Scotland recently announced that it will do the same.

In Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), PrEP is not available yet. However, demonstration projects are currently being set up in Georgia, Ukraine and Azerbaijan. These pilot studies consist of several phases. In Georgia, the first stage of PrEP implementation included a training session for those involved in the pilot, as well as the conducting of a needs assessment among Georgian men who have sex with men (MSM) and capacity building for local NGOs, before the actual start of the pilot in 2017. In Central Asian countries, there seems to be less interest in PrEP, although the Ministry of Health of Kyrgyzstan is planning to start an evaluation on the possibilities of introducing PrEP in the country.

Challenges of introducing PrEP in EECA may include the cost of PrEP, but also the high levels of stigma and discrimination in some countries. However, with HIV incidence in EECA rising by 57% between 2010 and 2015, treatment alone will not stop the epidemic. Given its proven effectiveness, providing PrEP to key populations can be a significant step in controlling the explosive growth of the HIV epidemic in this region.

The Union demands that TB be included in the WHO list of bacteria for which new antibiotics urgently needed

social-shareToday, 28 February, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Desease stated that it is unacceptable that tuberculosis (TB) was excluded from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) published list of antibiotic-resistant ‘priority pathogens’, released yesterday.

The Union further added that the WHO must revise the list to include TB – the world’s leading infectious disease killer – with immediate effect and called upon the international community to support demands that TB be included in the catalogue of bacteria posing the greatest threat to human health – and for which new antibiotics are urgently needed.

The bacteria that cause TB kill more people than any other infectious pathogen. Latest WHO figures state that in 2015, 1.8 million people died, including 210,000 children. An estimated 580,000 people were reported to have drug resistant versions of TB – both multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) – while actual numbers affected could be even higher.

The only way of treating TB is with antibiotics. Current treatments for resistant forms of TB are arduous and are accompanied by side effects that include deafness and psychosis, as well as practical difficulties for families, communities, health systems and livelihoods.

TB R&D has been systematically underfunded during the previous decade. The current spending of $620 million on all TB R&D (vaccines, diagnostics and treatment) is only one third of the $2 billion annual funding target outlined in the 2011–2015 WHO Global Plan. Funding in TB drug R&D is only 28% of the $810 million called for in the Global Plan to End TB 2016-2020. This is counter to the global aim of accelerating progress against TB in order to reach the ‘End TB Strategy’ by 2030.

“It is outrageous to sideline TB from global antimicrobial resistance (AMR) efforts. The Union strongly urges WHO to include TB on its list of priority pathogens. Among the group of antimicrobial-resistant diseases, drug-resistant TB is a leading cause of sickness and death.

Failing to include TB on its list was a dramatic departure from the data, and it undermines efforts to find the new and better treatments that patients desperately need. This is particularly critical for those countries where drug-resistant TB is epidemic,” said José Luis Castro, Executive Director, The Union.

“As G20 leaders are set to meet and discuss an agenda for tackling antimicrobial resistance, The Union strongly urges them to follow the data. They should include TB in any G20 initiatives aimed at increasing R&D investments and piloting models to deliver new medicines used to treat antimicrobial-resistant disease,” said Dr Jeremiah Chakaya Muhwa, President of The Union.

Source: The Union

Reversing the HIV Epidemic

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Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)

HIV remains a significant public health problem in the 31 countries of the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA), with around 30 000 newly diagnosed HIV infections reported each year over the last decade. In a two-day conference organised in collaboration between the Maltese Presidency of the Council of the European Union and ECDC, HIV experts from across the European Union discussed how to reverse this trend and how to prepare Europe to achieve the set target of ending AIDS by 2030.

“This conference arose from excellent collaborative work with ECDC and Malta’s commitment and recognition of the importance of placing HIV higher up on the EU agenda during its Presidency Term” says Mr Chris Fearne, Minister for Health, Malta. “We believe that concerted efforts must include all stakeholders: including governments, healthcare providers, civil society, people living with HIV and the specialised agencies like WHO and ECDC. We believe that tackling HIV is a regional, national, corporate and individual responsibility. They all have a role to play in terms of political commitment, preventive action, universal access to healthcare, affordability and access to medicines, testing, linkage to care, focus on key populations, zero tolerance to stigma AND individual behavioural responsibility.“

He added areas of action: “Scaling up of testing is essential to reach our first 90 target. We need to make better use of various settings to enhance testing, incorporate innovative approaches to testing and reduce the barriers, especially in key populations. Knowledge of HIV status ‘in unaware persons’ might also help reduce new HIV infections – those resulting negative may then take less risks, and if linked to care should achieve viral suppression, the third 90“.

“If we take a look at the available data, we can see that Europe needs to improve its HIV response in several areas”, says ECDC Acting Director Andrea Ammon. “Currently, two out of three EU/EEA countries tell us that they do not have sufficient funding for prevention interventions. And every one in seven people living with HIV in the region are not aware of their infection. To reduce the number of new HIV infections in Europe, we need to focus our efforts in three main areas: prioritising prevention programmes, facilitating the uptake of HIV testing, for example by introducing new approaches like community-based testing or self-testing to diagnose those infected. And, of course, easier access to treatment for those diagnosed”.

Pharmaceuticals-Healthcare-Pill-World-Map-Earth-1185076Status quo of Europe’s HIV response: new ECDC report
On the occasion of the Presidency meeting, ECDC publishes an overview of achievements and gaps in the European HIV response, illustrating how countries addressed the HIV epidemic in 2016, based on their commitment outlined in the Dublin Declaration on Partnership to Fight HIV/AIDS in Europe and Central Asia.

The results show, amongst others, that HIV treatment overall starts earlier across the EU/EEA and more people receive life-saving treatment. But one in six people in the EU/EEA diagnosed with HIV are still not on treatment. Those who are on treatment, however, show how effective current HIV treatment is: almost nine out of ten people living with HIV on treatment are virally suppressed. This means the virus can no longer be detected in their blood and they cannot transmit the virus to others.
The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) contributed to this overview with data on the HIV situation and prevention coverage among people who inject drugs.

EMCDDA Director Alexis Goosdeel states: “People who inject drugs have the highest proportion of late diagnosis of HIV, compared to other transmission groups. Providing voluntary testing for infectious diseases, risk behaviour counselling and assistance to manage illness at drug treatment facilities is an important additional avenue to reach this group and is among the new EU minimum quality standards for demand reduction” .

The introduction and scaling up of effective drug treatment and harm reduction measures, such as needle and syringe provision, have significantly reduced drug injecting and related HIV transmission in Europe. However, this overall positive development hides large variations between countries. Marginalisation of people who inject drugs, the lack of prevention coverage, and appearance of new drugs can trigger local HIV outbreaks, as documented in five EU countries in the recent past.

Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control