The 3rd regional autumn school in Bishkek

On October 29, AFEW partners came together in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, for 3 days to take part in the annual Autumn School, which is organized within the project “Bridging the Gaps: health and rights of key populations“.

The great energy of the participants and amazing nature gave a chance to everyone to enjoy the event and to discuss important issues on prevention and treatment of #HIV, harm reduction, migration, and financing in the region of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Participants in the Autumn School included representatives of AFEW partners from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, Russia, and the Netherlands, sub-recipients of the project “Bridging the Gaps”, as well as other partners and experts including those from Great Britain and the USA.

Active space

The Autumn School quickly became an active space for discussion: about strategy, barriers, innovations, and partnership opportunities between the participating organizations. During the first day, participants shared updates on the “Bridging the Gaps” project and activities in their countries – Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, and Tajikistan. The afternoon session was devoted to a World Café, in which partners exchanged ideas and developed specific actions to overcome challenges that they often encounter in their work.

The second day was devoted to the topic “Stimulant use and chemsex”. Benjamin Collins, director of International HIV Partnership (IHP), which partners with medical and community activists across Europe and the Middle East for successful responses to HIV and viral hepatitis, joined the Autumn School in Bishkek to share his experience on chemsex . The topic of (problematic) chemsex was further elaborated in the presentations of Monty Moncrieff, Chief Executive of London Friend, a London charity working to promote the health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people, and Daria Alexeeva, program director of AFEW International. Monty spoke about the London experience in harm reduction, while Daria presented materials of Nikolay Lyuchenkov, an infectious disease doctor and expert on sexual health issues from Russia, which were focused on trends and responses to chemsex in Russia and EECA region.

 

The third and final day of the conference was devoted to workshops on migration, rehabilitation and financial sustainability. Evgeniya Alekseeva, director of Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS-MEDIA”, presented analysis of NGOs funding situation in EECA region; Elena Zhirnova, manager of the project “Our Choice: Empowering Vulnerable Women in Kyrgyzstan” (AFEW-Kyrgyzstan) told about challenges and opportunities of social entrepreneurship in the country; and Fatima Yakupbayeva, co-founder of law firm “PRECEDENT” and publisher of the book “From Grant to Business Project”, shared auditing resources for launching a business model and recommendations on how to implement business ideas.

 

The session on migration started with a presentation by Rukhshona Kurbonova, coordinator of the Migrant Health Programs at International Organization for Migration in Tajikistan. She talked about labor migration in Central Asia, while Zulaika Esentaeva (IOM Kyrgyzstan) shared their experience on service-delivery by IOM Kyrgyzstan for vulnerable migrants.

The session on rehabilitation was devoted to building information campaigns. During the session, Marina Govorukhina, specialist on strategic communications and branding, author of the books “Communications in Public Organizations”, “Strategic Communications in Public Organizations”, demonstrated specific techniques of developing informational marketing campaigns for rehabilitation centers to the participants from Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine.

Moreover, the School included a 2-day training for AFEW communication managers, during which participants focused on learning about storytelling and SMM in the context of NGOs.

 

 

Natalya Shumskaya, director of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan

I especially noted the session on new psychoactive substances. This topic is relevant for our country, as sexual ways of HIV transmission keep growing in Kyrgyzstan, and new psychoactive substance use impacts sexual behavior. For us it is a wonderful opportunity to take on the experience of those countries that have already faced similar problems, and elaborate effective strategies for preventative measures in our country.

The third day was remarkable due to the acute topic of sustainability of civil society organizations. We all see the tendency of decreasing donor support in our countries. That means that civil society should aim to ensure financial sustainability independently, and one of the opportunities is the development of social entrepreneurship. During this meeting we shared the experience of creating our own social enterprise – a beauty salon. I would like to especially point out the session by Fatima Yakupbayeva from the “Precedent” company. She gave us specific business-ideas, which could be developed by an NGO in order to earn money independently and further direct it to realization of our statutory goals.

The importance of this event is in sharing and exchange of experience. When the financial support for our organizations is not that high, it is important to avoid duplication of activities, and, on the other hand, to consolidate our efforts in order to realize our main strategic goals. For instance, the past regional meetings allowed us to bring good practices of working with youth at risk from Ukraine to our country. We are very grateful that we didn’t have to be the pioneers in this, but rather adapt and use their experience. Also, I think that the experience of Kyrgyzstan will be useful to some of our colleagues, and they will be able to apply it in their countries.

Monty Moncrieff MBE, Chief Executive of London Friend

It’s important for people working in the region on the same issues to have the opportunity to come together and share their knowledge and experience. It helps build the data on important topics, and enables participants to share what they’re seeing locally, as well as share tips on how to address new and emerging trends. It also helps build relationships, which spark ideas for new partnerships. Even though the internet gives us great opportunities to connect and work together online it’s difficult to get that richness of connection without bringing people together in person, and doing so for a number of days provides lots of opportunities for conversations outside the formal sessions.

We can always learn from one another, and hopefully by inviting people who have been working on issues for some time in other countries we can bring the benefit of that experience. We can share leaning about what’s worked and what hasn’t for us, and hopefully that can benefit people who are only starting to see these issues emerge locally.

Evgeniya Alekseeva, PHD in medical sciences, Director of Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS-MEDIA”

Meetings such as the Autumn School are important, because they bring together people from different countries and cities, create space for discussing acute issues and situations in our field, allow to form alliances, agree about partnerships, as well as have informal conversations and take a break from the daily routine.

At the Autumn School in Bishkek, I especially noted a very interesting session on chemsex, sessions on business projects for NGOs, and on migration. I will certainly use this knowledge further while writing proposals, developing new projects and creating new ideas.

Zarina Siyakova, program coordinator of the Tajik Network of Women Living with HIV

This meeting provided me with a great opportunity to learn more about what is happening in other countries in regards to promoting prevention and treatment of HIV. I especially noted the session on chemsex, as I hadn’t had a chance to encounter this issue before. I was particularly interested in the presentation by Monty Moncrieff, as well as the presentation of Nikolay Luchenkov from Russia on chemsex in EECA.

Also, I received answers to many questions on migration that I’m interested in, and most importantly, exchanged contacts with almost all the participants. It is well known that nowadays there is a very large stream of migrants from Tajikistan to Russia, and many of them lack information about services for migrants and d existing organizations in Russia. Now our organization will be able to refer our clients to these organizations, and we won’t lose them out of sight.

If you are interested in specific presentations of the Autumn School, please send your request to autumnschool@AFEW.nl.

New UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia

UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (UNAIDS SI Hub) has been launched on the Internet.

The purpose of this resource is to provide an online one-stop-shop for data, publications and strategic information about HIV (and related health issues) in EECA. It is publicly accessible to anyone online, but it aims to make information accessible and easy to find for specialists and policymakers working on HIV in governmental, non-governmental organizations and partners across EECA.

The address of the hub is http://eecahub.unaids.org/ and it’s managed by UNAIDS RST  in Moscow, with support from UNAIDS HQ. It currently features HIV data from the latest GAM reports, as well as published reports and presentations related to HIV in EECA. It’s possible to access the country-specific data and reports as well as reports and publications from the various menus. By selecting “data” and “factsheets”, you can generate and print Regional and Country factsheets as PDFs as well access as epidemiology slides with global and regional statistics.

The hub works in two official UN languages – English and Russian, but most of the publications will only be available in the language they are produced (and not translated into other languages by UNAIDS).

For contribution to the UNAIDS SI Hub please send your suggestions, data, publications and other materials to eecasihub@unaids.org.

Mass media as partners in counteracting HIV/AIDS epidemic

Mass media play a major role in fighting for human rights, especially when it comes to population groups vulnerable to HIV. Through the wide media coverage of successful human rights defence cases implemented by community and civil society, the government can see that the community of People Living with HIV (PLHIV) and people vulnerable to HIV can and should be an equal partner and an ally in fighting HIV/AIDS epidemic.

This helps with forming a positive image of PLHIV and representatives of other key populations in the society, decreases stigma and discrimination, raises their self-esteem and self-significance and gives motivation for further activities and professional growth.

Thanks to the coverage of successful practices in mass media, a large number of PLHIV, people who use drugs (PWUD) and representatives of other vulnerable groups gain opportunity to get basic human rights knowledge, action plans and tools, which allow them to solve problems related to violation of human rights due to HIV in their own regions independently.

Liudmila Vins, project manager of LUNa Social Support Centre, legal adviser of Interregional Center for Human Rights in Yekaterinburg, has applied to the Emergency Support Fund for key populations in EECA for a grant. The goal of her project is to change the legal environment and public opinion towards people living with HIV and representatives of groups vulnerable to HIV through mass media.

Liudmila, what is the core of your project?

Our way of working is as follows – our lawyer together with partners, street lawyers from the regions, collects successful legal practices and strategically important cases, prepares the gathered materials for media publications, provides a legal evaluation and an algorithm for solving the problem. An info manger writes articles based on the cases for mass media and our own media resources, passes information about these cases to journalists through mailing lists, social media, and connects media and people featured in the cases in order to prepare further materials.

Could you tell us about the intermediate project results?

Yes, the project has substantially helped us to develop the informational part of our work and also gave a start to a new project of educating Russian NGOs on working with media. We found 17 cases, which resulted in 33 publications. Each case contained a story of at least one person – the leading story character, and at least 2 more people connected to the story, close relatives of the leading character. In total 51 people were featured in the stories.

Please share the most interesting and remarkable moments of the project.

The most remarkable example of support within this project is Olga’s story (the name is changed). We published it on our website.

Local journalists quickly noticed this material; they immediately reacted and published a number of articles about the fact that a woman in detention facility doesn’t receive treatment for HIV-infection. The news travelled fast: one journalist made a lot of requests to government agencies and received a positive decision from government officials. The result was that this woman received medication the same day.

You started your social support activities for vulnerable groups in 2009. How have the statistics changed since then?

At that time harm reduction programs were developing actively. However, the issue of defending the rights of PWUD was still unresolved, so starting from 2012 I began to develop street lawyers programming in Yekaterinburg. The need for this kind of support is very high now. In 2012 legal assistance was given to 100 people per year, and there was one street lawyer. Currently we work with 5 street lawyers, and we give this kind of support to people on a regular basis.

Who are the street lawyers?

These are people from the key populations community who are taught the basics of human rights defense. So, they can provide basic support with human rights defense, and then, if necessary, pass on cases to professional lawyers.

What is the attitude of the key populations’ representatives towards your activities?

We have a good connection with our target group, they are happy to receive our support. However, there are certain difficulties. For example, a person can disappear for a period of time while being under our supervision. Then (s) he appears again in a month, and we have to start from the beginning.

Why do you think it is so important to involve representative of key populations in such work?

Almost all of our staff members except for two are people from the key populations/PWUD community. I have been in remission for a long time myself. I think that a different approach is simply not effective. Nobody can truly understand PWUD as well as a person who has gone through it too, and most importantly, who was able to overcome it and solve a problematic situation successfully.

When people are doing something for the society, they often have an ideal example of such society in mind. Do you have one?

I don’t have examples of an ideal situation in any country. There are drawbacks everywhere. When it comes to talking about the approach to working with PWUD in Russia, I reply that there’s simple no such work. Those few NGOs that provide harm reduction programs, can’t reach all the PWUD to the full extent. For me the ideal situation is when the system of social support is developed in the country, there are harm reduction programs, access to quality treatment, and there is no stigma and discrimination within the society.

The Coordination Committee called on the Global Fund to support the fight against HIV epidemic in Russia

The Coordination Committee for the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS in Russian Federation, responsible for oversight and coordination of the implementation of the Global Fund grants in Russia, called on the Global Fund to allocate funding to support civil society organizations in their fight against HIV epidemic in Russia for the next three years.

2019 is the year of the replenishment for the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) and by the end of this year, based on the results of the replenishment, the Global Fund will make a decision on the allocations for the eligible countries to address HIV, TB and Malaria for the next 3-year period.

According to the 2019 Global Fund Eligibility List, the Russian Federation has met the requirement of two consecutive years of eligibility based on income classification and disease burden and is now eligible to receive an allocation of funding to support the HIV/AIDS response for the next 3 years. Since the Russian Federation is not on the OECD-DAC List of ODA recipients, according to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, the Russian Federation may only be eligible for an allocation to support the HIV response efforts by non-governmental or civil society organizations and only if the country demonstrates barriers to providing funding for interventions for key populations, as supported by the country’s epidemiology.

According to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, “the eligibility for funding under this provision will be assessed by the Secretariat as part of the decision-making process for allocations. As part of its assessment, the Secretariat, in consultation with UN and other partners as appropriate, will look at the overall human rights environment of the context with respect to key populations, and specifically whether there are laws or policies which influence practices and seriously limit and/or restrict the provision of evidence-informed interventions for such populations.”

It is a well-known fact that Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) is the only region in the world where the HIV epidemic continues to grow , and Russia has been considered as the “driving force” of this regional growth. According to the UNAIDS 2018 Global AIDS Update, “the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia has grown by 30% since 2010, reflecting insufficient political commitment and domestic investment in national AIDS responses across much of the region. Regional trends depend a great deal on progress in the Russian Federation, which is home to 70% of people living with HIV in the region. Outside of the Russian Federation, the rate of new HIV infections is stable.

 

 

EECA INTERACT is a step towards the development of unified community

Why is the Workshop EECA INTERACT so important for the EECA region?

Alexei Alexandrov, a member of the international committee of EECA INTERACT 2019, head of Minsk regional clinical centre “Psychiatry-narcology”.

EECA INTERACT can become a model for building regional and country interaction between young and experienced researchers, medical practitioners, employees of non-governmental organizations and members of community initiatives, as well as representatives of the government.

All these specialists are involved in solving the problems of HIV infection, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis, and also related problems of drug use, criminalization, prison health, stigma and human rights. The exchange of experience by specialists from EECA countries with similar situations on HIV, TB, Hep, drug use, the results of new studies and expert assessments will allow choosing the best solutions to change the situation and begin to really implement them.

For me, EECA INTERACT is not only a meeting with new colleagues and getting acquainted with the results of their work, discussing pressing issues, forming direct contacts to continue cooperation or a network of interaction. The seminar is a continuation of the efforts that we, experts of the EECA countries, are directing to respond to the HIV epidemic in the region, implementation of those innovations that have already been tested in the world and are evidence-based.

The workshop is a step towards the development of a unified scientific, expert and practical community of our countries, united by common tasks. Everyone can have their own vision of the situation, challenges and solutions, but only joint discussion and analysis will allow finding potential points of influence for success.

 

How would you rate the development of clinical and research networks in the EECA region today?

Sergii Dvoriak, a member of the international committee of EECA INTERACT 2019, M.D., D.Med.Sci, founder and senior scientist, UIPHP, professor at the department of social work, ALSRT.

In our region, a lot of problems are associated with the traditions and imperfections of medical education. For several years I conducted training seminars “Effective Treatment of Drug Dependence” in Salzburg (organized by the Open Society Foundation), where all participants, mainly doctors, were divided into 2 groups, the Russian-speaking from EECA and the English-speaking from Southeast Asia and Africa. People from EECA were educated in the “Soviet” system, the others – in the “Western”.

I noticed a very clear difference in the methods for solving clinical problems. People from EECA went into “philosophy” and the so-called pathogenetic way of thinking, and “Western” immediately appealed to existing protocols and standards, objective data, etc. I then realized that many of our specialists need to be retrained and they should focus on evidence-based methods, and not on general considerations and “clinical points of view.” For this, we need such meetings like EECA INTERACT, where these points can be emphasized. It is important also that decision-makers participate in such events.

In Ukraine over the past 10 years, significant progress has been made in the development of clinical and research links. To some extent, a solid research infrastructure has been created, several organizations were found which can not only participate in international collaborative projects but also independently carry out research and receive funding from donors such as National Institutes of Health, CDC, WHO etc. Unfortunately, national donors are still very sparingly involved in this process.

Ministry of Health also does not understand enough how important the systematic and continuous process of conducting scientific research is, and the importance of implementation projects is underestimated.

Officials believe that only mainly state institutions have the right to make scientific research. They expect global discoveries or creation of new vaccines, effective drugs, but they do not really understand that in the modern world only a limited number of countries and companies are able to take such steps. There are no such resources in EECA countries, but this does not mean that research is not needed. Doctors should be involved in scientific projects as much as possible, because this disciplines clinical thinking, makes it possible to get acquainted with the modern scientific context.

 

 

 

 

RADIAN for the EECA region

On the 10 of September the Elton John Aids Foundation with Gilead Sciences announced the launch of a new project RADIAN. This major project aims to bring support to Eastern Europe & Central Asia, where the AIDS epidemic is on the rise.

A ground-breaking initiative

The global community now has the tools to meaningfully address new HIV infections; however, HIV is on the rise in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). To address the challenges in EECA and ensure no one is left behind in the global effort to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the Elton John AIDS Foundation and Gilead Sciences have partnered together in a ground-breaking initiative called RADIAN.

RADIAN is a natural evolution of the existing collaboration between the Foundation and Gilead in the EECA Key Populations (EECAKP) fund, which gave the organisations a greater understanding of the urgent needs in EECA and the necessary experience to respond. The RADIAN partnership will provide investment, support and on-the-ground resources over the next five years to support interventions and drive measurable impact in EECA.

Model Cities

RADIAN consists of two programs: ‘Model Cities’ and the RADIAN ‘Unmet Need’ Fund. The programme will support innovative approaches, including new models of care and expanded prevention and healthcare programmes, led by groups who are on-the-ground and part of the community. The first RADIAN ‘Model City’ will be Almaty, Kazakhstan’s largest city. Additional ‘Model Cities’ will be announced in 2020

The Radian Unmet Need Fund

The RADIAN ‘Unmet Need’ fund will support local initiatives across the EECA region and beyond the select ‘Model Cities’. Initiatives selected will focus on prevention and care, education, community empowerment, and novel partnerships. The programme will be implemented locally, working with key stakeholders and partners.

The project encourages local and regional organisations in EECA who share its vision of significantly improving the quality of care for PLHIV, addressing new HIV infections and AIDS deaths to apply for grant funding when the Request for Proposals opens in mid-October 2019. Best practices and learnings from the local implementation of RADIAN over the next five years will be used as a blueprint towards creating change across the region.

Peer navigators – indispensable medical assistants

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan 

Over the past three years, express HIV testing in key populations in the East Kazakhstan region of Kazakhstan increased by a third. Peer navigators play a very important role in this success.

Today among key populations, including people who use drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with me, etc. there is a major increase in infection in the country. Representatives of these groups usually don’t come to AIDS centers and medical facilities for testing, but, as experience has shown, they easily visit non-governmental public organizations (NGOs) or ask peer navigators for such services.

Peer navigators – who are they?

The term “peer navigators” is very popular among social activists. People living with HIV (PLHIV) become voluntary medical assistants and help professionals to care about patients. They do express testing for HIV infection in peri-gingival fluid, provide counseling, and, if necessary, accompany PLHIV to AIDS centers for complete testing.

“Another important work of peer navigators is to increase the motivation of PLHIV for the constant and systematic use of special antiretroviral therapy (ARVs), which is extremely necessary for our patients to improve their health, – says Marina Zhigolko, head of the East Kazakhstan Center for the Prevention and Control of AIDS. With the participation of volunteers, in recent years, PLHIV adherence to treatment has quadrupled. Today, more than 80 % of these people take rescue therapy and can work fruitfully, have families, give birth to healthy children”.

Today in the East Kazakhstan region there are 20 peer navigators. In the framework of the USAID Flagman project, they are provided with rapid tests, tablets for record-keeping, disposable syringes, lubricants, and promo materials.

Personal example and motivation

Sergey Baranyuk, a peer navigator from the Answer public foundation, packs a backpack in the morning and sets off on his route to work “in the field”. He is an ex-prisoner, has been living with HIV for many years, he used drugs. Today Sergey has a family, a job, and he helps other people to overcome the life situation he had before. His life experience helps him to convince those who, for various reasons, fall out of medical control and are not tested for HIV.

“The express test for peri-gingival fluid is convenient to use,” says Sergey. It can be done on a bench in a park, in a car, at home. After 15-20 minutes, a person already knows his HIV status. While he is waiting for the result, a peer navigator can talk to him about the risks of behaviour, ways of transmitting HIV infection and precautions. ”

Trust on the Health Route

Over three years, with the joint work of peer navigators and health visitors in the East Kazakhstan region, the number of PLHIV on follow-up has doubled. People come for medical monitoring of health, testing and medication. Peer navigator work not only in the regional center, but also in villages. For example, some villages of Glubokovsky, Shemonaikhinsky, Ulan districts, as well as Ridder-city are also under the control of public activists.

Many people prefer to come for testing at an NGO. For this, for example, the public funds “Answer” and “Kuat” have specially equipped rooms. Here people can talk frankly and do a test.

The first six months are the most important in the work of peer navigators. After some time, patients start to understand the importance of treatment themselves. But before peer navigator should find a person from the risky behaviour group and convinces him to find out his HIV status and, if necessary, start treatment.

“Navigators are our ears, eyes and foot,” says Neil Mamyrbekova, head of the treatment department at the Semey AIDS Center. «One doctor is not able to single-handedly cover patients, set them up for treatment, and convince them in the possibility to start a new life. A person must come to us prepared, therefore navigators are our main assistants. They are trusted!»

Monitoring of HIV-related stigma and discrimination

The ways in which HIV-related stigma and discrimination are manifested and experienced are complex and varied. Many different measures from different perspectives are currently used to monitor HIV-related stigma and discrimination.

To better understand the status of HIV-related stigma and discrimination and progress towards their elimination, support advocacy for addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination and highlight data gaps, UNAIDS is coordinating the development of summary measures of HIV-related stigma and discrimination. Please see the concept note for more background information.
Starting on 19 August 2019 for a period of three weeks, various elements of the draft measures will be discussed. A few key questions will guide the moderated discussion each week. Inputs and recommendations from each week will be shared at the start of the following week and used to inform the next element of the measures to be discussed.
To participate in the consultation please read more information here.

Through the 2016 Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS, the global community committed to eliminating HIV-related stigma and discrimination by 2020 “for the equal enjoyment of all human rights and equal participation in civil, political, social, economic and cultural life, without prejudice, stigma or discrimination of any kind” of people living with, at risk of and affected by HIV.
The proposal is to develop one summary measure of HIV-related stigma and discrimination and four accompanying summary measures of stigma and discrimination experienced by sex workers, gay men and other men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs and transgender people related to factors other than HIV. This will make it possible to capture the diverse forms of stigma and discrimination that may be experienced by key populations most affected by HIV that may not be directly due to HIV but that have important impact on the HIV response.

This virtual consultation aims to encourage broad participation, particularly of people living with and affected by HIV, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, young people, sex workers, people who use drugs and women, from all regions. Contributions through this consultation will be used to inform the development of the measure(s) and ensure they are people-centered, reflecting the lived experiences and realities of people, and meaningful to inform programmatic action.
A summary of inputs and recommendations from the consultation will be shared in September 2019. 

What is the indicative target of your country?

Nearly one year after the first-ever United Nations High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis, the Stop TB Partnership, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the World Health Organization, call for immediate action to implement the commitments that were made by Head of States and Governments.

Targets that were agreed in the October 2018 Political Declaration of the High-Level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Fight Against Tuberculosis for 2018-2022 are:

1) to provide appropriate diagnosis and treatment to 40 million people with TB, including 3.5 million children and 1.5 million people with drug-resistant TB;

2) to reach at least 30 million people with preventive treatment, including 4 million children under the age of five, 6 million people living with HIV and 20 million other household contacts of people affected by TB;

3) to mobilize US$13 billion annually needed by 2022 for implementation;

4) to mobilize US$2 billion annually for TB research and innovation.

The Stop TB Partnership, in collaboration with Avenir Health, has produced a  breakdown of what the global 40 million and 30 million treatment targets mean for each country, using the latest estimates of TB disease burden and data on case notifications published by WHO. This country-by-country breakdown (http://www.stoptb.org/resources/countrytargets/) provides indicative targets and benchmarks that could be used to inform country dialogue, further refinement and development of official national and sub-national targets, linked to the development and updating of national strategic plans for TB and associated funding requests, including to the Global Fund.

TB is now the world’s leading infectious killer, surpassing even HIV. In 2017, TB killed 1.6 million people, including 300,000 HIV-positive people.

Several high-TB burden countries have already started to use indicative targets to plan their actions towards ending TB, and others must do so as well if we are to collectively achieve the targets of the High-Level Meeting.

“The UN High-Level Meeting in 2018 demonstrated much greater political commitment to tackling TB, but now we need to deliver. We urgently need increased international funding to fight TB, and increased domestic resource mobilization,” said Peter Sands, Executive Director of the Global Fund. “Together, we must step up the fight to diagnose and cure the millions currently being left untreated and to counter the threat of drug-resistant TB. We can only reach the goal of ending TB as an epidemic by 2030 if we act now.”

EECA INTERACT 2019

We are pleased to announce that, on the 18-19th November 2019, the first EECA INTERACT Workshop 2019 will take place in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

The EECA INTERACT 2019 Workshop builds scientific research capacity while simultaneously strengthening clinical, prevention, and research networks across the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) region. EECA INTERACT 2019 is an abstract-driven workshop focusing on factors unique to the region’s HIV, TB, and hepatitis epidemics. Bringing young and bright researchers together with top scientists, clinicians, and policymakers, EECA INTERACT 2019 aims to ignite a conversation that will build a stronger scientific base to serve the region and connect to the world.

EECA is the only region in the world where the HIV epidemic continues to rise rapidly. UNAIDS estimates point to a 57% increase in annual new HIV infections between 2010 and 2015.1 The World Health Organization has warned of a sharp rise in rate of HIV and tuberculosis coinfection, which poses a real threat to progress.2 Significant barriers to prevention and treatment services remain for people living with and affected by HIV, TB, and hepatitis across the region. For example, although the HIV epidemic in EECA is concentrated predominantly among key populations, particularly among people who inject drugs, coverage of harm-reduction and other prevention programs is insufficient to reduce new infections. The region urgently needs more effective strategies of prevention, treatment, and care and support that are tailored to the particular circumstances of individual countries.

The Amsterdam Institute of Global Health and Development (AIGHD) has over a decade of experience delivering in-country workshops and conferences that bring young researchers and established international experts together to share original research and state-of-the-art reviews on a wide range of topics. AIGHD has co-hosted the INTEREST Conference (the International Workshop on HIV Treatment, Pathogenesis, and Prevention Research in Resource-limited Settings) since its inception in 2007. The conference has grown from a small workshop to a full conference of more than 500 attendees each year.

Building on these proven results, AIGHD will collaborate closely with AFEW International and the AFEW network (AFEW) for EECA INTERACT 2019. AFEW’s deep roots and experience in the region offer a way to build sustainability into the new workshop, placing priority on local contributions. The EECA INTERACT 2019 will bring scientists, clinicians, members of civil society, and government officials together to tackle topics facing individual countries while building capacity and strengthening research and clinical networks. The two-day conference will focus on topics that are specifically relevant to EECA and dive deeply into particularities of the host country Kazakhstan, showcasing its successes, remaining challenges and responses.

The workshop objectives are:

  • To provide cutting-edge knowledge in the fields of epidemiology (modelling), treatment, pathogenesis, and prevention of HIV, TB, and viral hepatitis as well as chronic conditions;
  • To exchange ideas on providing and supporting HIV testing services and clinical care provision to adults, adolescents, and children living with HIV to achieve 90-90-90 goals;
  • To foster new research interactions among leading investigators and those who represent the potential future scientific leadership for health care and research in the region;
  • To build research and clinical capacity across EECA.

We invite researchers from EECA to submit their abstracts in the workshop. Selected abstracts will get free registration. Please find here more information.
Interested parties who do not have abstracts, but also wish to attend the event, can fill in an application form that will be considered by the committee. Please find here more information.

The deadline for all applications is September 20, 2019.

EECA INTERACT 2019 is organized by AFEW International, Amsterdam Institute for Global Health & Development (AIGHD), AFEW Kazakhstan and the Kazakh Scientific Center of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases.

EECA INTERACT 2019 is sponsored by Johnson & Johnson, Gilead, Aidsfonds.

Venue of the event: Hotel Mercure Almaty City Center.

#EECAINTRACT2019

If you have any further questions, please contact Helena_Arntz@AFEW.nl.