How to help migrants?

According to UNAIDS (www.unaids.org)[1], Russia has the second highest number of labour migrants in the world after the USA. Rostov region is one of the areas where this number is constantly growing. One of the reasons is its geographical position – Rostov region has the biggest borderline with Ukraine. Due to this fact as well as certain developments related to the armed conflict in Donetsk and Lugansk regions, many migrants from Ukraine with different statuses are coming to Rostov region, in addition to the labour migrants from Central Asia.

Are there any special services for migrants in Rostov-on-Don? How is HIV prevention implemented among migrants? Where can migrants seek help without endangering themselves? AFEW International asked these questions to Vyacheslav Tsunik, President of Rostov-on-Don Regional NGO “KOVCHEG – AntiAIDS” and Manager of the Project “HIV Prevention and HIV Services for Migrants in Rostov-on-Don”.

Significant financial support to carry out surveys and provide services to migrants within this project was provided by AFEW International, which, in particular, facilitated coordination with the Central Asian organisations to provide effective support to migrants when they leave their countries of origin and come to Russia.

For reference

Labour migrants are one of the populations most vulnerable to HIV in the world, which is explained by a number of factors. The data of numerous studies show that people coming from the Central Asia have a very low knowledge of infectious diseases: HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C. The situation is further aggravated with the low social and economic status of the migrants from Central Asia and the neighbouring countries, lack of access to health services, low level of social support and high prevalence of depression caused by such people living away from their families. High isolation of this social group often leads to HIV transmission inside this community, in particular through contacts with female sex workers, who come from the same countries.

Vyacheslav, how accessible is health care for the labour migrants in Rostov-on-Don?

Health care is provided to the labour migrants who officially live in Russia, in particular in Rostov region, based on their insurance certificates, which they buy when registering their patents. Without certificates, people can access health care on a paid basis, while emergency care if a person’s life is under threat in cases of heart attacks, strokes, catastrophes or accidents is provided to everyone, even with no documents, free of charge and is covered by the state.

How well informed are labour migrants about the problem of HIV?

Surveys among the labour migrants showed that they are not well informed about HIV. In our opinion, the reason is lack of preventive information provided to them in educational institutions in their home countries and when they come to work in Russia.

Do migrants practice any risky behaviours?

In fact, the prevalence of risky behaviours among migrants is approximately the same as among all young people. If we talk about the migrants who come from Asia, e.g. from Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, they have less risky behaviour due to their national customs and traditions. They mostly socialize with their fellow countrymen and they also have respect to older people and certain traditions, which restrict their risky behaviours. As for people from Ukraine and Moldova, they are closer to us, Russians, in terms of their culture and so the situation among them is similar to ours. There are young people who practice high-risk behaviour in terms of HIV. Mainly, they represent key populations. Their share in the total number of migrants is not so big, but they exist and some of them are clients of our organisation. They are not ready to quit their behaviour models.

Are there any differences in the behaviours of HIV-positive and HIV-negative migrants?

There is really a difference in the behaviours of migrants with HIV and those who do not have HIV.

Migrants living with HIV are a closed group. They are not ready to talk about their disease with their family members or their countrymen. Usually, they seek help in HIV organisations only in life-threatening situations or sometimes when they need to stock up their ARVs if there is a danger of treatment interruption.

In Russia, if migrants test positive for HIV, they cannot access free antiretroviral (ARV) therapy as they are foreign citizens. How is this issue resolved?

The situation with supply of ARVs is regulated by relevant provisions. In Russia, government covers ARV therapy only for the citizens. That is why migrants are not able to access free treatment as they are not Russian citizens. However, our organisation has contacts with community organisations in a number of neighbouring countries. We can help people who come to us and assist them is getting support services and ARVs from the countries of their origin.

Currently you are implementing the project “HIV Prevention and HIV Services for Migrants in Rostov-on-Don”. Please tell us more about it.

The goal of our project is to slow down the transmission of HIV through raising the awareness of HIV among migrants and creating services aimed at HIV prevention in migrant populations.

What do we do? Firstly, we train peer consultants from among migrants. Secondly, we provide medical and social support to HIV-positive migrants, giving them access to health services. Thirdly, we have meetings and negotiations with the representatives of diasporas concerning implementation of the prevention tools among migrants in Rostov region and coordinate service provision with the NGOs in the countries of origin of those people who seek our help.

Our organisation, “KOVCHEG – AntiAIDS”, is a community-based organisation of people living with HIV, representatives of vulnerable populations, PLWH, sex workers, LGBT and migrants. For instance, with our current project we trained a peer consultant from the migrant community. This is a woman from Ukraine living with HIV. Another peer consultant that we have, who works with people who use drugs, is also a citizen of Ukraine. Besides, when we carried out a survey among migrants, we had a volunteer supporting us – Ravshan from Uzbekistan – who is a student of a university in Rostov region.

Within the project for migrants, we organized the process to deliver HIV services. In particular, we have rapid testing, pre- and post-test counselling, if necessary provision of ARVs from our reserve stock, medical assays and support in receiving consultations from infectious disease doctors, tests for immune status and viral load, prescription of medications and treatment monitoring. We also inform migrants about the existing legal opportunities to acquire Russian citizenship with HIV status and facilitate people with HIV in obtaining temporary residence permits and Russian citizenship.

How and where do you share information about the services available?

Migrants can access our informational leaflets in the places, which they visit, such as the migration departments, health institutions, which issue the required health certificates to them, pre-deportation detention centres, and higher educational institutions we cooperate with. We use QR codes, allowing migrants to download any information on their smartphones and use it when necessary. As a result, it brings clients to our consultants, who can provide them with any additional information needed.

Name one of your most important recent activities?

Recently, we appealed to the Public Monitoring Commission and asked it to help us access the migrants in pre-deportation detention centres. The Public Monitoring Commission sent an official request to the Ministry of Internal Affairs. We visited the detention centres, met with the migrants living with HIV who stayed there and agreed with the administration of such centres that we would have further access to such migrants living with HIV. We are planning to seek financial opportunities for people living with HIV to receive consultations from infectious disease doctors, get tested for their immune status and viral load and access ARVs for the period of their stay in such institutions. Besides, we are working on developing an appeal to the government officials about the need to provide this category of people with HIV treatment at the expense of the state.

[1]Migrant populations and HIV/AIDS: the development and implementation of programmes: theory, methodology and practice / UNAIDS, UNESCO.

We Need to Talk about Chemsex!

Gay people, sex and drugs are a taboo in Russia. Despite the fact that those topics are usually not discussed, chemsex is gaining pace in the society.

Maksim Malyshev, Social Work Coordinator at the Andrey Rylkov Foundation, told AFEW International about the problem of chemsex, the rudiments of harm reduction in Russia and the mental health of people engaged in chemsex.

How widespread is chemsex in Russia?

It is a difficult question as so far there have been no studies on the prevalence of chemsex in Russia. Based on my personal observations, I can say that it exists and gains popularity over the time. Firstly, it is a global trend. Secondly, drugs are easily available in Russia through the dark net. Thirdly, discrimination and stigmatization of the vulnerable communities, in particular LGBT people, lead to the growing pressure on the community members, so they are more tempted to get isolated and engage in new destructive experiments.

Is chemsex a problem of big cities or does it also exist in smaller towns?

Mainly, it is a problem of metropolises – Moscow, St. Petersburg, maybe Ekaterinburg, Rostov and Krasnodar. It is important to understand that big cities are the centres of the gay community. Gay people from all over the country come to such cities because it is easier for them, they are not so stigmatized, there are more opportunities and a bigger community there.

Why is chemsex mainly the problem of gay community?

Of course, sex and drugs exist not only in the gay community, but also in heterosexual and transgender communities. However, I as well as many other experts in this sphere stick to the classical concept of chemsex and associate it specifically with the gay community. This community is affected by all the factors, to which chemsex can be related. I mean minority stress, stigmatization, and peculiarities of self-identification (where sex is an important element). In transgender communities, there are also drugs and sex, and for many transgender sex workers drugs are the way to survive, respond to their personal problems, depression, etc. This is only my personal opinion, of course, and I cannot speak for those communities.

What are the key issues caused by chemsex?

There are four key issues: HIV and sexually transmitted infections, mental health, the problem of choice and violence and loneliness.

When people engage in chemsex, their sexual activity intensifies, substances enhance their libido and endurance, leading to the growth in the number of sexual intercourses and partners, while their ability to control the important things goes down. People do not use condoms, their sex becomes more traumatic, their sensitivity threshold is reduced, while the level of energy and aggression goes up, which altogether leads to the higher risks of HIV and other infections.

Talking about the mental health problems, it should be mentioned that after chemsex people feel lonely and exhausted. In Russia and Europe, people engaged in chemsex use the substances, which have a negative influence on their mental health, so that it is more difficult for them to be mentally stable. They grow addicted, so when people stop taking substances, usual sex feels dull to them. The situation is aggravated with the repressive drug policy and fear of people to draw the attention of police and criminals, becoming the target for blackmailing.

Are harm reduction services available to people engaged in chemsex in Russia?

Now, we only have some rudiments of such services in Russia. For instance, Andrey Rylkov Foundation which was recognized as a foreign agent, implements outreach activities at the techno parties for gay people. We distribute condoms, lubricants and test people for HIV. Besides, we organize self-help groups for people affected by chemsex. Such groups meet on a regular basis. We also focus our efforts on providing psychological support to people affected by chemsex. AFEW International really helped us by supporting the project allowing our outreach workers to visit techno events. We procured condoms and lubricants within the ESF grant. This grant gave a big impulse to develop our activities.

I know another Russian organization, which opened an NA group for the gay community members. Those are all the services available for now. That is why our foundation together with Parni Plus NGO submitted a joint proposal to the Elton John AIDS Foundation to develop our project aimed at the gay community in the context of chemsex.

What services are to be developed in your opinion?

Now an interesting survey is carried out in the gay community, with the community members telling about their problems, ways to resolve them and share their preferences. Hopefully, we will soon see its results.

As for my personal perspective, I think that more efforts should be definitely aimed at the gay identity, so that people can identify as gay, so that they can open up. It is important for people to accept themselves, come out to their family and friends, and build contact with them. Lack of self-identification is a vital reason why people engage in chemsex. However, it is not possible to implement such activities in Russia as they fall under the concept of gay propaganda.

There should also be a bigger focus on harm reduction services. What we can do now – outreach visits to saunas and apartments to meet the community members – is not enough. It would be good to have a needle and syringe programme. However, many event organizers are afraid to implement such measures as they can draw the attention of police.

I also think that it is important to open rehabilitation centres for people affected by chemsex. Today there are no places where we can refer those people! Even if they are ready to pay for the services. All the rehabs are aimed just at people who use drugs, where there is no tolerance to the LGBT community members.

Still, are you able to create some printed or online materials under such circumstances?

Yes, there are some things that the activists do. For example, a comic book on chemsex has been published. It will be distributed in clubs. There is also an anonymous website, where LGBT community members can find the information on harm reduction and rehabilitation.

What was your biggest impression lately?

There was one case, which startled me not so long ago. There was a guy, who came to our foundation with his story. Some people he met invited him to have sex in a park after using some mephedrone. When he came there, he saw that his new “friends” had wristbands and a club. They took him to some strange venue, where there was a corpse lying. The guy was frightened and managed to escape somehow. He told us that afterwards he was ready to call the police and file a complaint against those men. But then he was too afraid. He was afraid that the police would not believe him, afraid that he would be arrested for using drugs, afraid that he would lose his job, would be registered with the police and would become a victim of jokes because of his sexual orientation.

I really hope that one day this situation will change. What we are doing now is a step into the future.

 

 

 

IT’S TIME

24 of March is a World TB Day 2020.World TB Day is a big moment to sound the alarm, raise attention, and tell world leaders to follow through on their promise to diagnose and treat 40 million people with TB by 2022, as agreed at the UN High-Level Meeting (UNHLM) on TB in September 2018.

We all need to work together now on important activities to make sure that World TB Day 2020 is the biggest and most effective.

What we together can do?

  • REACH OUT
    Reach out to your political leaders (Mayors, Parliamentarians, Ministers of Health, Heads of State) to request their leadership in the fight to END TB, remind them of the commitments and targets that have to be reached by the end of 2022, and request their engagement for World TB Day. This could include making a public statement, supporting an event, introducing a motion in parliament, or committing to achieve the UNHLM country targets.
  • GET SOCIAL 
    The hashtags for this year’s World TB Day are #ItsTimetoEndTB and #WorldTBDay. Start raising awareness through social media. Share your plans with us on Twitter or Facebook.
  • MAKE IT STARRY
    Reach out to celebrities, influencers, TV personalities, and other figures to ask them to join your efforts and raise awareness or wear a red arrow pin ahead of World TB Day. Stop TB partnership has a list of national celebrities, journalists and personalities that we can share with you case by case, so don’t hesitate to get in touch with us to get their contacts.
  • TEAM UP
    Team up with local TB partners to join forces in planning major World TB Day events, public mobilizations, and other activities. Stop TB partnership have a database of partners at country level – so do not hesitate to get in touch with us to be able to identify the partners with whom you want to work for these events.

Text – http://www.stoptb.org/

Help Here and Now

“If you can help someone Here and Now, you should do it without postponing it or thinking what other people can do,” says Ekatherina Rusakova, Director of Sverdlovsk Regional Charitable Organization “Malaxit” supporting people in difficult life situations. “If every one of us helps at least one person, maybe it will drive changes in the society.”

To support these words, Malaxit implements the project “Social and legal support of people who use drugs in Yekaterinburg” with financing and support of the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA).

Ekaterina how does your organization help people who use drugs in Yekaterinburg?

Ekatherina Rusakova, Director of Sverdlovsk Regional Charitable Organization “Malachite”

Mainly we provide social and legal support to clients to eliminate regulatory and discriminatory barriers, help them to get fair court decisions and access to free rehabilitation. Besides, we provide our clients with referrals to healthcare and social support institutions of the city. Our social worker makes outreach visits to families with small children. He provides consultations on HIV and treatment, helps clients to make appointments with specialists, assists them in re-issuing documents and receiving temporary registration in the city as clients are not able to receive medical or social services without registration.

Why did you decide to apply to the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in EECA?

We applied to the Emergency Support Fund because the situation of PUD in our city is difficult. Many people still do not recognize that substance use is a disease. However, this condition needs comprehensive treatment, including medical assistance, psychological and social support. Moreover, efforts should be aimed not only at the person using substances, but also at such person’s family as substance abuse is a systematic, family disease.

Of course, current situation contributes to the growth of HIV and other socially significant diseases (tuberculosis), while people who use drugs remain outsiders and the society prefers not to notice them. However, it is not possible to solve this problem pretending that it does not exist, after all sooner or later it will manifest itself and, most likely, in a very negative way. That is why, in our opinion, enough attention should be paid to secondary prevention and working with the “risk groups”.

What case from your practice do you remember best of all?

Andrey, a representative of the Rehabilitation Center, Dmitriy Kadeikin, consultant, and a social worker of the project, after a lawsuit in Revda, Sverdlovsk Region

That’s a story of one of our clients. Andrey came to our project when he learned about it from his friends. Back then, there was an investigation against him based on part 2 of article 228 of the Russian Criminal Code. Our staff members signed a social support agreement with him, drafted procedural requests and collected all the necessary documents. Social worker of the project acted as a community advocate in court. A person from the rehab also took part in the court hearings. As a result of our joint efforts, Andrey got a suspended sentence with a course of rehabilitation.

What does the society think about your work?

It depends: some people support us, some don’t and it’s fine! All people cannot think the same and have the same “view of the world”. We are all different, with various views, values, attitudes, and that’s the beauty of human beings – in their differences…

Have you ever faced any challenges working with the key populations?

Speaking about the members of key populations, our target groups, they are all positive about our activities, they trust our staff members and our experience. We mostly see challenges related to new psychoactive substances, which our clients still use. That is why they can have unpredicted behaviours, treatment interruptions, etc.

How does engagement of the key populations in your activities help you in your work?

I think that when implementing such projects it is very important to engage members of the key populations. Without such engagement, it is not possible to reach PUD, who are a very closed target group, especially considering that in this group there is a very low level of trust to people.

Your example of a perfect society.

I don’t think I could give you an example of a perfect society. I tend to be realistic when looking at things, not losing myself to illusions. I do not like it when people say that somewhere there is a perfect country and a perfect society, where everything is fine, which we should strive to achieve. There are some pitfalls everywhere. It is important to realize that there are good things everywhere and we need to learn to notice and appreciate them. I am sure that we have to always start with ourselves and you can of course feel offended and be angry at our country and our authorities, but it does not bring any results. Speaking about a specific country with the approach to working with key populations that I like, for me it’s Portugal.

The project is supported by the Elton John AIDS Foundation and Aidsfonds.

 

How KP organisations in Russia change people’s lives

Despite significant struggles and risks to their lives, HIV activists in Russia work relentlessly to create a supportive environment and improve access to HIV and health services for key populations and adolescent girls and young women.

At a recent conference in Saint Petersburg on comprehensive rehabilitation and reintegration of people who use drugs, PITCH partner Humanitarian Action together with the Government of Saint Petersburg brought together representatives from both non-governmental and governmental organisations, medical institutions, and academia.

At the conference, they shared best practices and discussed prospects for addressing the pressing needs of people who use drugs in the Russian Federation. The conference provided great opportunities to connect with representatives of civil society organisations working on HIV/AIDS and learn first-hand from experts about the latest HIV/AIDS trends and programmes to tackle the epidemic in Saint Petersburg and Russia as a whole.

Leading by example

Linas Cepinskas (PITCH, Amsterdam): “On the ground, our partners have been doing exemplary work. Besides ongoing valuable contribution to different working groups and meetings with government authorities in Saint Petersburg, they keep on delivering excellent prevention and support services to the most affected key population groups”.

Significant policy work is being done by for instance, E.V.A., a Russian network of women living with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. They are engaged in the analysis of different prevention programmes across Russia. By collecting best practices and approaches, for instance, they are trying to bring government’s attention to the needs of young key populations.  One of the examples E.V.A. showed us was the community centre of Silver Rose, a sex worker-led organisation. Sex workers can bring their children to a day care while testing for HIV, TB and/or syphilis. In addition, a psychologist and a social worker are available, if needed.

Another telling example of prevention services in gay clubs and saunas is the work of the LGBT organisation Gigieya. In addition to giving out free condoms, they offer speed-testing for HIV, TB and hepatitis. This service is crucial, especially for those with lower income and less awareness of HIV, for instance, migrants. “To cater for specific groups even better, Humanitarian Action has a mobile clinic tailored to, among others, female sex workers and drug users. They also have a special fast-response brigade for people with disability, consisting of psychologists, social workers, and medical doctors“, added Linas.

 

Committed partnership

PITCH is committed to supporting community-based organisations to uphold the rights of populations most affected by HIV and engage in effective advocacy in the Russian Federation. The recent visit to Saint Petersburg illustrates some positive and inspiring results and offers new insights into ongoing and future programmes to improve local access to HIV and health services for key populations in the Russian Federation.

 

New UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia

UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (UNAIDS SI Hub) has been launched on the Internet.

The purpose of this resource is to provide an online one-stop-shop for data, publications and strategic information about HIV (and related health issues) in EECA. It is publicly accessible to anyone online, but it aims to make information accessible and easy to find for specialists and policymakers working on HIV in governmental, non-governmental organizations and partners across EECA.

The address of the hub is http://eecahub.unaids.org/ and it’s managed by UNAIDS RST  in Moscow, with support from UNAIDS HQ. It currently features HIV data from the latest GAM reports, as well as published reports and presentations related to HIV in EECA. It’s possible to access the country-specific data and reports as well as reports and publications from the various menus. By selecting “data” and “factsheets”, you can generate and print Regional and Country factsheets as PDFs as well access as epidemiology slides with global and regional statistics.

The hub works in two official UN languages – English and Russian, but most of the publications will only be available in the language they are produced (and not translated into other languages by UNAIDS).

For contribution to the UNAIDS SI Hub please send your suggestions, data, publications and other materials to eecasihub@unaids.org.

Mass media as partners in counteracting HIV/AIDS epidemic

Mass media play a major role in fighting for human rights, especially when it comes to population groups vulnerable to HIV. Through the wide media coverage of successful human rights defence cases implemented by community and civil society, the government can see that the community of People Living with HIV (PLHIV) and people vulnerable to HIV can and should be an equal partner and an ally in fighting HIV/AIDS epidemic.

This helps with forming a positive image of PLHIV and representatives of other key populations in the society, decreases stigma and discrimination, raises their self-esteem and self-significance and gives motivation for further activities and professional growth.

Thanks to the coverage of successful practices in mass media, a large number of PLHIV, people who use drugs (PWUD) and representatives of other vulnerable groups gain opportunity to get basic human rights knowledge, action plans and tools, which allow them to solve problems related to violation of human rights due to HIV in their own regions independently.

Liudmila Vins, project manager of LUNa Social Support Centre, legal adviser of Interregional Center for Human Rights in Yekaterinburg, has applied to the Emergency Support Fund for key populations in EECA for a grant. The goal of her project is to change the legal environment and public opinion towards people living with HIV and representatives of groups vulnerable to HIV through mass media.

Liudmila, what is the core of your project?

Our way of working is as follows – our lawyer together with partners, street lawyers from the regions, collects successful legal practices and strategically important cases, prepares the gathered materials for media publications, provides a legal evaluation and an algorithm for solving the problem. An info manger writes articles based on the cases for mass media and our own media resources, passes information about these cases to journalists through mailing lists, social media, and connects media and people featured in the cases in order to prepare further materials.

Could you tell us about the intermediate project results?

Yes, the project has substantially helped us to develop the informational part of our work and also gave a start to a new project of educating Russian NGOs on working with media. We found 17 cases, which resulted in 33 publications. Each case contained a story of at least one person – the leading story character, and at least 2 more people connected to the story, close relatives of the leading character. In total 51 people were featured in the stories.

Please share the most interesting and remarkable moments of the project.

The most remarkable example of support within this project is Olga’s story (the name is changed). We published it on our website.

Local journalists quickly noticed this material; they immediately reacted and published a number of articles about the fact that a woman in detention facility doesn’t receive treatment for HIV-infection. The news travelled fast: one journalist made a lot of requests to government agencies and received a positive decision from government officials. The result was that this woman received medication the same day.

You started your social support activities for vulnerable groups in 2009. How have the statistics changed since then?

At that time harm reduction programs were developing actively. However, the issue of defending the rights of PWUD was still unresolved, so starting from 2012 I began to develop street lawyers programming in Yekaterinburg. The need for this kind of support is very high now. In 2012 legal assistance was given to 100 people per year, and there was one street lawyer. Currently we work with 5 street lawyers, and we give this kind of support to people on a regular basis.

Who are the street lawyers?

These are people from the key populations community who are taught the basics of human rights defense. So, they can provide basic support with human rights defense, and then, if necessary, pass on cases to professional lawyers.

What is the attitude of the key populations’ representatives towards your activities?

We have a good connection with our target group, they are happy to receive our support. However, there are certain difficulties. For example, a person can disappear for a period of time while being under our supervision. Then (s) he appears again in a month, and we have to start from the beginning.

Why do you think it is so important to involve representative of key populations in such work?

Almost all of our staff members except for two are people from the key populations/PWUD community. I have been in remission for a long time myself. I think that a different approach is simply not effective. Nobody can truly understand PWUD as well as a person who has gone through it too, and most importantly, who was able to overcome it and solve a problematic situation successfully.

When people are doing something for the society, they often have an ideal example of such society in mind. Do you have one?

I don’t have examples of an ideal situation in any country. There are drawbacks everywhere. When it comes to talking about the approach to working with PWUD in Russia, I reply that there’s simple no such work. Those few NGOs that provide harm reduction programs, can’t reach all the PWUD to the full extent. For me the ideal situation is when the system of social support is developed in the country, there are harm reduction programs, access to quality treatment, and there is no stigma and discrimination within the society.

The project is supported by the Elton John AIDS Foundation and Aidsfonds.

Support. Do not punish!

In June 2019, dozens of cities in the EECA region hosted the campaign «Support. Do not punish». Activists took to the streets to publicly protest against repressive drug policies.

This action, which is held annually all over the world, is a great chance to once again draw attention to this unresolved problem. How it was in the EECA region in 2019 you can read here.

Plans for 2020

Are you part of a collective, network or organisation advocating for drug policies that prioritise health and human rights? Are you planning to join the 2020 Support. Don’t Punish Global Day of Action and have an outstanding plan to build momentum? If your answer is “yes” then this call for applications might be for you!

Through this call, the Support. Don’t Punish campaign aims to identify and support local partners (up to 7) with funding of between USD 2,000 – 4,000 for strategic, creative and collaborative projects building up to the 2020 Global Day of Action that advance drug policy reform, bolster harm reduction and build bridges with/within/between communities disproportionately affected by the “war on drugs” (e.g. people who use drugs, farmers of crops deemed illicit, youth, ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, among many others).

You can apply for the grant here.

What is “Support. Do not punish”?

Support. Don’t Punish is a global grassroots-centred initiative in support of harm reduction and drug policies that prioritise public health and human rights. The campaign seeks to put harm reduction on the political agenda by strengthening the mobilisation capacity of affected communities and their allies, opening dialogue with policy makers, and raising awareness among the media and the public.

The campaign’s yearly high point is the Global Day of Action, which takes place on, or around, 26th June (the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking). Historically, this date has been used by governments to showcase their drug control “achievements” in coercive terms. The campaign’s Global Day of Action seeks to reclaim and shift that day’s narrative. And so, every year, an increasing number of  activists in dozens of cities all over the world join this unique and multifaceted show of force for reform and harm reduction.

The Support. Don’t Punish campaign aligns with the following key messages

  • The drug control system is broken and in need of reform
  • People who use drugs should no longer be criminalised
  • People involved in the drug trade at low levels, especially those involved for reasons of subsistence or coercion, should not face harsh or disproportionate punishments
  • The death penalty should never be imposed for drug offences
  • Drug policy should focus on health, well-being and harm reduction
  • Drug policy budgets need rebalancing to ensure health and harm reduction-based responses are adequately financed.

 

The Coordination Committee called on the Global Fund to support the fight against HIV epidemic in Russia

The Coordination Committee for the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS in Russian Federation, responsible for oversight and coordination of the implementation of the Global Fund grants in Russia, called on the Global Fund to allocate funding to support civil society organizations in their fight against HIV epidemic in Russia for the next three years.

2019 is the year of the replenishment for the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) and by the end of this year, based on the results of the replenishment, the Global Fund will make a decision on the allocations for the eligible countries to address HIV, TB and Malaria for the next 3-year period.

According to the 2019 Global Fund Eligibility List, the Russian Federation has met the requirement of two consecutive years of eligibility based on income classification and disease burden and is now eligible to receive an allocation of funding to support the HIV/AIDS response for the next 3 years. Since the Russian Federation is not on the OECD-DAC List of ODA recipients, according to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, the Russian Federation may only be eligible for an allocation to support the HIV response efforts by non-governmental or civil society organizations and only if the country demonstrates barriers to providing funding for interventions for key populations, as supported by the country’s epidemiology.

According to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, “the eligibility for funding under this provision will be assessed by the Secretariat as part of the decision-making process for allocations. As part of its assessment, the Secretariat, in consultation with UN and other partners as appropriate, will look at the overall human rights environment of the context with respect to key populations, and specifically whether there are laws or policies which influence practices and seriously limit and/or restrict the provision of evidence-informed interventions for such populations.”

It is a well-known fact that Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) is the only region in the world where the HIV epidemic continues to grow , and Russia has been considered as the “driving force” of this regional growth. According to the UNAIDS 2018 Global AIDS Update, “the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia has grown by 30% since 2010, reflecting insufficient political commitment and domestic investment in national AIDS responses across much of the region. Regional trends depend a great deal on progress in the Russian Federation, which is home to 70% of people living with HIV in the region. Outside of the Russian Federation, the rate of new HIV infections is stable.