Prospects for cooperation in the health sector in Uzbekistan

On January 10, 2020, AFEW International, represented by Anke van Dam, Executive Director, and Daria Alexeeva, Program Director, met with Ambassador of Uzbekistan in Benelux countries Dilier Hakimov.

AFEW International is considering possibilities to implement two projects in Uzbekistan. The first one is to develop and improve the quality of HIV testing and prevention services for key populations and support people living with HIV.

The second project, entitled “Strengthening civil society in inclusive health care in Uzbekistan”, is currently under consideration by the European Commission and is on the reserve list of projects.

At the end of the meeting, the parties agreed on a schedule for the AFEW International delegation to visit Tashkent on 15-16 January 2020. AFEW International’s team will have negotiations with the Republican AIDS Center, as well as with representatives of some international organizations, which may act as donors for the implementation of projects of the non-governmental organization in Uzbekistan.

AFEW International already has experience in working in Uzbekistan: the organization supported several projects in the country through ESF, as well as was involved in preparations for the AIDS2018 conference. In addition, representatives from Uzbekistan participated in AFEW International’s community based research education project.

Help Here and Now

“If you can help someone Here and Now, you should do it without postponing it or thinking what other people can do,” says Ekatherina Rusakova, Director of Sverdlovsk Regional Charitable Organization “Malaxit” supporting people in difficult life situations. “If every one of us helps at least one person, maybe it will drive changes in the society.”

To support these words, Malaxit implements the project “Social and legal support of people who use drugs in Yekaterinburg” with financing and support of the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA).

Ekaterina how does your organization help people who use drugs in Yekaterinburg?

Ekatherina Rusakova, Director of Sverdlovsk Regional Charitable Organization “Malachite”

Mainly we provide social and legal support to clients to eliminate regulatory and discriminatory barriers, help them to get fair court decisions and access to free rehabilitation. Besides, we provide our clients with referrals to healthcare and social support institutions of the city. Our social worker makes outreach visits to families with small children. He provides consultations on HIV and treatment, helps clients to make appointments with specialists, assists them in re-issuing documents and receiving temporary registration in the city as clients are not able to receive medical or social services without registration.

Why did you decide to apply to the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in EECA?

We applied to the Emergency Support Fund because the situation of PUD in our city is difficult. Many people still do not recognize that substance use is a disease. However, this condition needs comprehensive treatment, including medical assistance, psychological and social support. Moreover, efforts should be aimed not only at the person using substances, but also at such person’s family as substance abuse is a systematic, family disease.

Of course, current situation contributes to the growth of HIV and other socially significant diseases (tuberculosis), while people who use drugs remain outsiders and the society prefers not to notice them. However, it is not possible to solve this problem pretending that it does not exist, after all sooner or later it will manifest itself and, most likely, in a very negative way. That is why, in our opinion, enough attention should be paid to secondary prevention and working with the “risk groups”.

What case from your practice do you remember best of all?

Andrey, a representative of the Rehabilitation Center, Dmitriy Kadeikin, consultant, and a social worker of the project, after a lawsuit in Revda, Sverdlovsk Region

That’s a story of one of our clients. Andrey came to our project when he learned about it from his friends. Back then, there was an investigation against him based on part 2 of article 228 of the Russian Criminal Code. Our staff members signed a social support agreement with him, drafted procedural requests and collected all the necessary documents. Social worker of the project acted as a community advocate in court. A person from the rehab also took part in the court hearings. As a result of our joint efforts, Andrey got a suspended sentence with a course of rehabilitation.

What does the society think about your work?

It depends: some people support us, some don’t and it’s fine! All people cannot think the same and have the same “view of the world”. We are all different, with various views, values, attitudes, and that’s the beauty of human beings – in their differences…

Have you ever faced any challenges working with the key populations?

Speaking about the members of key populations, our target groups, they are all positive about our activities, they trust our staff members and our experience. We mostly see challenges related to new psychoactive substances, which our clients still use. That is why they can have unpredicted behaviours, treatment interruptions, etc.

How does engagement of the key populations in your activities help you in your work?

I think that when implementing such projects it is very important to engage members of the key populations. Without such engagement, it is not possible to reach PUD, who are a very closed target group, especially considering that in this group there is a very low level of trust to people.

Your example of a perfect society.

I don’t think I could give you an example of a perfect society. I tend to be realistic when looking at things, not losing myself to illusions. I do not like it when people say that somewhere there is a perfect country and a perfect society, where everything is fine, which we should strive to achieve. There are some pitfalls everywhere. It is important to realize that there are good things everywhere and we need to learn to notice and appreciate them. I am sure that we have to always start with ourselves and you can of course feel offended and be angry at our country and our authorities, but it does not bring any results. Speaking about a specific country with the approach to working with key populations that I like, for me it’s Portugal.

The project is supported by the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

 

New UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia

UNAIDS Strategic Information Hub for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (UNAIDS SI Hub) has been launched on the Internet.

The purpose of this resource is to provide an online one-stop-shop for data, publications and strategic information about HIV (and related health issues) in EECA. It is publicly accessible to anyone online, but it aims to make information accessible and easy to find for specialists and policymakers working on HIV in governmental, non-governmental organizations and partners across EECA.

The address of the hub is http://eecahub.unaids.org/ and it’s managed by UNAIDS RST  in Moscow, with support from UNAIDS HQ. It currently features HIV data from the latest GAM reports, as well as published reports and presentations related to HIV in EECA. It’s possible to access the country-specific data and reports as well as reports and publications from the various menus. By selecting “data” and “factsheets”, you can generate and print Regional and Country factsheets as PDFs as well access as epidemiology slides with global and regional statistics.

The hub works in two official UN languages – English and Russian, but most of the publications will only be available in the language they are produced (and not translated into other languages by UNAIDS).

For contribution to the UNAIDS SI Hub please send your suggestions, data, publications and other materials to eecasihub@unaids.org.

HIV in prison is not a death sentence

Nowadays Kyrgyzstan is recognized as one of the most advanced countries in the world in regards to delivery of the harm reduction and HIV care and treatment programs in prisons (details here).

At the moment here, in the penitentiaries, there are 5 active programs: syringe exchange program, methadone maintenance treatment program, rehabilitation program “Atlantis”, Center for Rehabilitation and Social Adaptation “Clean zone” and “Start Plus” program.

Dina Masalimova, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan program manager, explained what kind of work is done in this field in the country, and which significant results have already been achieved.

Dina, could you please describe the programs for inmates? What do they look like?

A pilot program on needle and syringe exchange was introduced in Kyrgyzstan in 2002, in one of the prisons with a modest reach of 50 people. A year later the program was expanded to 3 prisons, and then several more. Today there are 14 syringe exchange stations (SES) in the penitentiary system. They work in all the prisons except for the facility for underage convicts. Also, syringe exchange services are provided in the 2 largest detention centers. An actual number of SES clients in 2018 amounted to over 1300 people. They received syringes either in person, or through a secondary exchange conducted by volunteers. Aside from the sterile injection equipment you can also find other protection items at the stations – alcohol wipes, condoms; and HIV blood tests are done here too. Those clients that would like to decrease or fully stop the injecting drug use are forwarded to the methadone maintenance treatment stations.

The methadone maintenance treatment program was started in the country’s prisons over 10 years ago – in 2008.  Today there are already 9 stations in the penitentiaries, and the number of clients is over 350. These programs are conducted by the State Penitentiary Service with the support of the Global Fund To Fight Aids, Tuberculosis And Malaria, as well as Center for Disease Control (CDC).

Aside from the harm reduction programs there is a program aimed at the full withdrawal from drug use in prisons. In a number of places the  “Atlantis” program based on the famous model “12 steps” is active. The program graduates can serve their remaining sentence time in the Center for Rehabilitation and Social Adaptation “Clean zone”. “Clean” means that it’s free from drugs. There is a full-scale program of rehabilitation and preparation for sober life outside of prison there.

Over the past 5 years we also were active in delivering services directly to inmates. For instance, our consultants have supported prisons’ health system by providing peer-to-peer consultations and HIV testing, as well as supported inmates before and after their release from prison. For a long time this program has been implemented with the support of USAID. Soon it will be continued thanks to the financial and technical support of ICAP (international program by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health).

How are these programs created, and who delivers them?

As a rule, these programs are created based on the actual needs of the most vulnerable groups of prisoners – people living with HIV and/or using drugs. And these programs are also delivered by the representatives of these communities.

We approach the program in a flexible way and always try to improve it so that it remains relevant. For example, one of our recent additions to the program is working with the convicts that were rejected by the prison subculture. Due to the unspoken prison rules this group of prisoners has the lowest level of access to medical and social support and faces a high level of stigma and discrimination from the other convicts, and often also from the prison staff.

Could you share some results of these programs?

All the programs currently active in the country are aimed at reaching the ambitious goal 90-90-90.  Now almost all inmates in prison are being tested for HIV “at the entrance”, and a vast majority of people living with HIV are formally in treatment. Why “formally”? The viral load indicators show that quite a few of inmates don’t use it. In prisons there are a lot of myths about HIV and antiretroviral therapy, and during in-person conversations many patients admit that they simply throw medicines away. Because of that, the main goal of our project is to increase the number of convicts who live with HIV with undetectable virus load.
Over the years we achieved great results. For instance, in prison #31 the number of people who are adherent and have a suppressed virus load has grown from 15% to 68%, and in prison #16 – from 33% to 66% in the past three years. We are especially proud of two prisons – #2 and #47, where we’ve already reached the second and third “90”.

All these programs are mainly targeting male convicts. Are there any special programs for female inmates, for pregnant women?

In Kyrgyz prisons there are only 10 female inmates living with HIV. However, it is also important to consider their needs while planning measures in response to HIV-epidemic. We approach work in female prisons quite reverently and are trying to make sure our programs are gender-sensitive.  In one prison there was a women self-help group focusing on gender violence prevention. Also we partner with NGO “Asteria”, which runs a women’s center supported by AFEW-Kyrgyzstan and open for women released from prison. Many of the center’s clients are former inmates, and the help and support program includes temporary lodging, provision of food and hygiene packages, peer consulting on HIV, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and opioid substitution treatment (OST), as well as provides access to gynecological services.

What is the prisoners’ attitude towards such programs?

Inmates perceive this program in a very positive way. Slowly but surely our team managed to win their trust and involve them into the dialogue about their health. It’s important to understand that health is far from the first priority for a person in prison. Unfortunately, current conditions of prisons make basic survival the main priority, and HIV is perceived as a far removed problem for many of them. Our peer consultants have their own experience of living with HIV in a prison, so they can show by their own example how one could solve upcoming problems.

Could you name the main current problem for prisoners with HIV in Kyrgyzstan?

One of the main problems is the lack of medical staff in the penitentiary system. In a number of large prisons in the country there are no doctors with higher medical degree. All the work on supporting prisoners’ health is put on the shoulders of a small team of paramedics. Of course, very often they have no time or knowledge needed to perform quality work on supporting inmates with HIV. We also try to help in such cases. For example, in prison #16 there was no doctor for a whole year, and our organization set up weekly visits of a doctor from the Republican AIDS center in order to support the patients.

It is often said that many prisoners don’t trust prison staff, including health workers…

Yes, it’s a separate and quite serious problem, and the consequence of it is the unwillingness of prison inmates to follow doctors’ recommendations. Our consultants serve as a certain “bridge”, which helps to build trust-based relationships between doctors and patients. For instance, with the patients’ agreement they take the results of viral load and cd-4 tests and thoroughly explain their meaning to the patients, e.g. the influence of the therapy on those indicators etc. We try to find individual approach to everyone. For many people the possibility to have a family and healthy children when they reach undetectable viral load becomes the best motivation for treatment.

It seems that peer-to-peer consulting is a really life-saving tool when it comes to fighting for the health of prisoners living with HIV, isn’t it?

Александр Certainly! We have so many stories that prove it. For instance, the story of Alexander. He learned about his positive HIV-status in 2013. His prison mates gave him a clear verdict that he would die soon. Needless to say, he was in great shock. He didn’t have any access to information, and doctors didn’t explain much. On the verge of desperation he started to use more drugs. He looked at the people with positive HIV-status around him, and they were dying one after another. He also waited for his turn.
In 2016 peer consultants from the Action against HIV project started to come to the prison. One of them – Evgeniy – really impressed him. He was living with HIV himself, but he didn’t look like he was dying at all, quite the contrary. During one conversation with a peer consultant Alexander got more information than in the previous 3 years of his life with positive HIV-status. At that moment he told himself: “Enough. I choose life”. He started treatment and quite soon reached undetectable viral load.

For people living with HIV in Belarus

Since July 19, 2019, a new version of article 157 “Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus” of the Criminal Code of Belarus has been enforced. Despite the approved amendments to this article, it still contributes to vulnerability of the key populations, in particular serodiscordant couples (where one of the partners has HIV). However, a solution has been found, thanks to which the amendment will be able to serve for the benefit of people living with HIV.

For reference

There is a number of important provisions in the new version of article 157 of the Criminal Code of Belarus.

  • Knowingly exposing another person to HIV is punished with a fine or an arrest or imprisonment for up to three years.
  • If an individual, who knows about being infected with HIV, transmits HIV to another person recklessly or with indirect intent, this offense is punished with imprisonment for the term from two to seven years.
  • The action stipulated by the second part of this article committed against two or more persons, or a person who is known to be a minor, or with direct intent, is punished with imprisonment for the term from five to 13 years.

Besides, the amendment to this article says that the individual committing the actions stipulated in the first and second parts of the article may be relieved from the criminal liability in case if the other person, who was exposed to HIV or was infected with HIV, had been in advance warned about the fact that such individual had HIV and voluntarily agreed to perform any acts, which led to HIV exposure.

Avoiding prosecution

Before this amendment was enforced, the People PLUS Republican Public Association in cooperation with the Republican Center for Hygiene and Epidemiology held a round table to develop a set of measures, which would allow people to fully use the amendments in laws and protect themselves from the criminal prosecution. It resulted in the development of a road map and other documents regulating the fact of warning, which would lead to the enforcement of this amendment. Such documents include.

– New form “How to warn another person that I have HIV”

– Form to warn a contact person of a patient with HIV

– Memo on HIV prevention

Anatoliy Leshenok, Director of the People PLUS Republican Public Association

“When preparing the documents, we tried to take into account any possible circumstances and potential barriers,” says Anatoliy Leshenok, Deputy Director of the People PLUS Republican Public Association. “For example, the Investigative Committee, commenting on the amendment, pointed out that it is important to understand what is the procedure to check in which state an individual gave his or her consent to have a contact with a person living with HIV, to check if he or she had enough information, etc. The Notary Chamber suggested to register informed consent as a confirmation of consent for the contact with a person living with HIV. The Republican Center for Hygiene and Epidemiology developed a new notification form to be used when registering people with HIV diagnoses for follow-up, provided explanations on the amendment to article 157 of the Criminal Code of Belarus and told that it is possible to come to them with a partner to register the fact of warning of HIV exposure. A memo on HIV notification has also been developed and will be published within our project. It will be given to the partners of HIV-positive people. The memo contains contact details of the organizations providing services to PLWH as well as legal consultations.”

Who is at risk?

In the recent 6 months, there were 55 criminal cases initiated in Belarus based on article 157 of the Criminal Code. This number is similar to the one that was registered in 2018. However, it should be noted that 28 cases out of this total number were opened based on the first part of this article, where there is no fact of HIV transmission, but only a perceived risk.

“Recently, we were defense witnesses at a court hearing, when the defendant was charged with putting five sexual partners at risk of HIV,” tells Anatoliy. “The defendant did not transmit HIV to any of those partners – he took ARVs and had an undetectable viral load. The court took into the consideration the scientific consensus statement on HIV transmission, the answer of a WHO representative and the reply from the Professor of the Infectious Disease Department of the Belarus State University on the risk of HIV transmission by a person with suppressed viral load. However, the verdict of the court was that there was still a risk of HIV transmission, so the sentence remained unchanged – 18 months at standard regime penal colony. Just imagine – 18 months of imprisonment for not transmitting HIV to anyone!”

In fact, article 157 put a question mark over the existence of serodiscordant couples, who often live together for many years and even have children. Usually, within such criminal cases charges are brought against a husband or a wife, while the “victim” clearly states in court that he or she has no complaints to the spouse and that he or she was consciously taking risk to conceive a child with a loved one.

Drawbacks of this article also relate to the fact that criminal cases are initiated with no complaints from the victim.

“When making amendments in article 157, we were suggesting more radical changes – to fully exclude responsibility for exposure to HIV from this article – but the society is so far not ready for such changes,” continued Anatoliy. “Currently, the cases initiated based on this article are reviewed, where the sentences directly state that the partner was informed about HIV and consciously agreed to the actions, which led to HIV transmission or exposure to HIV. According to the Code of Criminal Procedure, the review of such cases is initiated by penal colonies and prisons, and if a person is not imprisoned, such person should file a relevant request for review with a court.”

First successes 

Approval of the amendment to article 157 of the Criminal Code “Transmission of HIV” allowed talking about the first successes of the activists in HIV response in Belarus. Now hundreds of people can have the record of their conviction expunged.

“People PLUS” thanks for the help provided in 2017-2019 by HIV justice, GNP +, EWNA. Amendment to art. 157  was brought in  Criminal Code Belarus thanks financial and technical assistance from these organizations.

Thanks the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) People PLUS have implemented additional set of measures people living with HIV in Belarus will be able to avoid criminal prosecution.

RADIAN for the EECA region

On the 10 of September the Elton John Aids Foundation with Gilead Sciences announced the launch of a new project RADIAN. This major project aims to bring support to Eastern Europe & Central Asia, where the AIDS epidemic is on the rise.

A ground-breaking initiative

The global community now has the tools to meaningfully address new HIV infections; however, HIV is on the rise in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). To address the challenges in EECA and ensure no one is left behind in the global effort to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the Elton John AIDS Foundation and Gilead Sciences have partnered together in a ground-breaking initiative called RADIAN.

RADIAN is a natural evolution of the existing collaboration between the Foundation and Gilead in the EECA Key Populations (EECAKP) fund, which gave the organisations a greater understanding of the urgent needs in EECA and the necessary experience to respond. The RADIAN partnership will provide investment, support and on-the-ground resources over the next five years to support interventions and drive measurable impact in EECA.

Model Cities

RADIAN consists of two programs: ‘Model Cities’ and the RADIAN ‘Unmet Need’ Fund. The programme will support innovative approaches, including new models of care and expanded prevention and healthcare programmes, led by groups who are on-the-ground and part of the community. The first RADIAN ‘Model City’ will be Almaty, Kazakhstan’s largest city. Additional ‘Model Cities’ will be announced in 2020

The Radian Unmet Need Fund

The RADIAN ‘Unmet Need’ fund will support local initiatives across the EECA region and beyond the select ‘Model Cities’. Initiatives selected will focus on prevention and care, education, community empowerment, and novel partnerships. The programme will be implemented locally, working with key stakeholders and partners.

The project encourages local and regional organisations in EECA who share its vision of significantly improving the quality of care for PLHIV, addressing new HIV infections and AIDS deaths to apply for grant funding when the Request for Proposals opens in mid-October 2019. Best practices and learnings from the local implementation of RADIAN over the next five years will be used as a blueprint towards creating change across the region.

Peer navigators – indispensable medical assistants

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan 

Over the past three years, express HIV testing in key populations in the East Kazakhstan region of Kazakhstan increased by a third. Peer navigators play a very important role in this success.

Today among key populations, including people who use drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with me, etc. there is a major increase in infection in the country. Representatives of these groups usually don’t come to AIDS centers and medical facilities for testing, but, as experience has shown, they easily visit non-governmental public organizations (NGOs) or ask peer navigators for such services.

Peer navigators – who are they?

The term “peer navigators” is very popular among social activists. People living with HIV (PLHIV) become voluntary medical assistants and help professionals to care about patients. They do express testing for HIV infection in peri-gingival fluid, provide counseling, and, if necessary, accompany PLHIV to AIDS centers for complete testing.

“Another important work of peer navigators is to increase the motivation of PLHIV for the constant and systematic use of special antiretroviral therapy (ARVs), which is extremely necessary for our patients to improve their health, – says Marina Zhigolko, head of the East Kazakhstan Center for the Prevention and Control of AIDS. With the participation of volunteers, in recent years, PLHIV adherence to treatment has quadrupled. Today, more than 80 % of these people take rescue therapy and can work fruitfully, have families, give birth to healthy children”.

Today in the East Kazakhstan region there are 20 peer navigators. In the framework of the USAID Flagman project, they are provided with rapid tests, tablets for record-keeping, disposable syringes, lubricants, and promo materials.

Personal example and motivation

Sergey Baranyuk, a peer navigator from the Answer public foundation, packs a backpack in the morning and sets off on his route to work “in the field”. He is an ex-prisoner, has been living with HIV for many years, he used drugs. Today Sergey has a family, a job, and he helps other people to overcome the life situation he had before. His life experience helps him to convince those who, for various reasons, fall out of medical control and are not tested for HIV.

“The express test for peri-gingival fluid is convenient to use,” says Sergey. It can be done on a bench in a park, in a car, at home. After 15-20 minutes, a person already knows his HIV status. While he is waiting for the result, a peer navigator can talk to him about the risks of behaviour, ways of transmitting HIV infection and precautions. ”

Trust on the Health Route

Over three years, with the joint work of peer navigators and health visitors in the East Kazakhstan region, the number of PLHIV on follow-up has doubled. People come for medical monitoring of health, testing and medication. Peer navigator work not only in the regional center, but also in villages. For example, some villages of Glubokovsky, Shemonaikhinsky, Ulan districts, as well as Ridder-city are also under the control of public activists.

Many people prefer to come for testing at an NGO. For this, for example, the public funds “Answer” and “Kuat” have specially equipped rooms. Here people can talk frankly and do a test.

The first six months are the most important in the work of peer navigators. After some time, patients start to understand the importance of treatment themselves. But before peer navigator should find a person from the risky behaviour group and convinces him to find out his HIV status and, if necessary, start treatment.

“Navigators are our ears, eyes and foot,” says Neil Mamyrbekova, head of the treatment department at the Semey AIDS Center. «One doctor is not able to single-handedly cover patients, set them up for treatment, and convince them in the possibility to start a new life. A person must come to us prepared, therefore navigators are our main assistants. They are trusted!»

People who Use Drugs Deserve Love, Respect and Support

Author: Grana Ziia, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan

Sergey Bessonov from Bishkek is the head of the organization that protects the rights of people who use drugs (PWUD) – “Harm Reduction Network Association” (HRNA). Sergey himself used drugs in the past. However, he admits that everyone has the right to make his own choice whether to stop using drugs or not.

Now Sergey dedicates his life to the community of people who use drugs. In his interview with AFEW-Kyrgyzstan, Sergey is talking about the challenges of the community of people who use drugs in Kyrgyzstan, drug policy and his future plans. Below are some of Sergey’s thoughts in direct speech.

About the desire to be heard

For a long time, the problem of drug use was solved by using strict bans: prisons, fines, and information that PWUDs are no longer members of our society, that they are somehow bad, dangerous… I myself know a lot of people who died from the overdose, I saw people who spent most of their lives in prisons for using soft drugs. These people were left without work, housing and the possibility to live the life they wanted to.

Now in Kyrgyzstan, the government started to understand that a progressive drug policy cannot be built without a community. However, it is very important for us that the community participation in the development of programs was not just for show. We want our opinion to be respected, considered and trusted. We need the possibility of professional growth.

About the professional growth

The project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations” (BtG) started to help us a few years ago. Over the past two years, this project gave people from the community the possibility to take part in trainings on negotiation skills, legal monitoring by the community, analysis of regulatory legal acts.

These trainings helped us to develop some of our skills. Using this knowledge, people from our community started to develop their own organisations, participate in working groups with governmental representatives and implement advocacy programs.

About the new drug policy

Last year, our country started talking about changes in criminal and administrative codes. Governmental representatives finally understood that sending people who use drugs to prison instead of rehabilitation and harm reduction programs is ineffective and cruel.

During the analyses of new regulatory acts that HRNA conducted with the support of the BtG project and AFEW-Kyrgyzstan, we found some negative changes. For example, new amendments, which now started to work, increased the fine for carrying and possession of drugs twice. The new fine is unaffordable, which means that people will again be imprisoned. Now we are negotiating with international and state structures, with other NGOs and explaining to them why this novelty needs to be revised.

BtG also provided us with an opportunity to conduct focus groups among PWUDs. We found out that not all people are aware of the new laws. This creates extortion and corruption. Now we are constantly monitoring new cases of detention of drug users and support people who use drugs.

About the alternative to prisons

According to the new offense code of Kyrgyzstan, alternative punishment that is called probation is provided for people who use drugs and who have committed any kind of offense. Therefore, now a person has an opportunity to avoid prison.

The initiative itself is very good and we now have a lot of work for its successful implementation. We have already come to the agreement with several probation services and they are letting us know if a person who uses drugs came to them.

HRNA also plans to work with judges to explain that we should punish people only for offenses, not for using drugs. People in our country still have many stereotypes towards people who use drugs. These stereotypes can influence judges’ decisions about sending a drug user to prison or probation.

About the needs of the community

People who use drugs almost always remain alone. Parents turn away from them, doctors reject to help, friends betray them, mass media use offensive words, police suspect them in all crimes. Sometimes we become the only home and friend for each other. With our examples, we show that people who use drugs deserve love and respect.

To help our community to be strong and united, the BtG project is supporting our dialogue platform. Thanks to this, we can meet, discuss and stay united. I feel that the community is getting stronger and more confident with years passing by.

Together we build a liberal healthy future in Kyrgyzstan, where every person can get help and fulfill their potential.

AFEW International is Finding New Possibilities in Russia

Anke van Dam meeting with the representatives of the Fund for Resocialization of the Republic of Tatarstan

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

AFEW International continues looking for possibilities of helping key populations at risk for HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis and community organisations in the Russian Federation. AFEW’s executive director Anke van Dam visited a couple of NGOs and community-based organisations during her recent visit to Moscow and Kazan.

In Kazan, Anke van Dam visited Fund for Resocialization of the Republic of Tatarstan. This fund for the first time in Russia successfully tested the model of purposeful employment of those who went through all stages of rehabilitation. For more than three years, the Fund for Resocialization offers employment to people who were using drugs, who are working on modern production of ventilation systems.

“What Daniyar, the director of the Fund for Resocialisation is doing, is amazing. He gives people with a history of drug use and sometimes of imprisonment as well, a chance to earn their own living again. With the job they regain their self-esteem, which helps them to get in touch with their family and participate actively in society again,” says Anke van Dam.

The Fund for Resocialization of the Republic of Tatarstan is engaged in the resocialization of people dependent on the psychoactive substances

The Fund for Resocialization of the Republic of Tatarstan, is engaged in the development and implementation of the state regional program for the resocialization of people who use drugs.

“It is resocialization that will allow us to establish new links with the society, to consolidate, to approve and apply the knowledge and principles obtained at the stage of rehabilitation in the social environment. We all know that for people who use or used drugs it is not easy to find jobs. They often have problems with their relatives, and some of them even do not have their own housing. Many of those who had treatment, again find themselves in the surrounding that provokes drugs use soon after they left the hospital,” states on the Fund’s website.

HIV Voluntary Counselling and Rapid Testing Points in Three More Cities in Tajikistan

Voluntary counselling and rapid HIV testing points (VCT) on the premises of public organizations were opened in three more cities of Tajikistan – Dushanbe, Kulob and Khujand – on December 1, 2017. On this day, voluntary counselling and rapid HIV testing services were launched in public organizations Vita, SVON Plus and Amali nek.

“Opening a VCT point on the premises of our organisation will undoubtedly increase the detection of HIV among the key populations. Our clients and AIDS centres are very much interested in this because the timely treatment will help them to save their health and life,” the director of the public organization Amali nek Abduholik Abdurakhmonov is saying.

Creating HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing points, namely training of medical personnel, making the reparations, purchasing necessary furniture and equipment, became possible because of the project ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations 2.0’ and due to the regular consultations with AFEW-Tajikistan’s specialists.

“In 2015, AFEW-Tajikistan appealed to the Ministry of Health and Social Protection of the Republic of Tajikistan with a proposal to open a VCT point on the premises of the second office of our organisation in Khatlon region. This initiative was approved by the order of the Ministry and since October 2015, all HIV service organizations of the country had the opportunity to introduce the VCT service. Exactly one year ago, on December 1, 2016, the first point that provides voluntary counselling and rapid HIV testing service started its work in the city of Kurgan-Tube. It operates on the premises of our office in Khatlon region. Now our experience helps other public organizations to create and equip similar offices,” the project manager of AFEW-Tajikistan Dilshod Pulatov is sharing.

In April and September 2017, in Qurghonteppa and Khujand, AFEW-Tajikistan organised a seminar and workshop to share the experience of the organisation on the introduction of VCT services on the premises of a public non-profit organization. The participants also studied the procedures for documenting and planning the costs for maintaining VCT points.

“The seminar-meeting on the introduction of VCT service helped me to understand the main stages of work, what documentation is needed, what requirements for equipping the premises are, how to train staff and what the process of budgeting activities is to introduce VCT service,” the director of the Public Association VITA Eraj Nazarov is saying. “AFEW-Tajikistan helped us to renew the premises according to the necessary requirements, and also trained two of our medical workers for providing pre-test counselling and HIV testing services.”

During the opening ceremony of voluntary counselling and rapid HIV testing points, everyone had an opportunity to be counselled and tested for HIV.