A chance to be heard

Participants from Kazakhstan with AFEW International

Participants from Kazakhstan with AFEW International

Stigma and discrimination are recognized as some of the most commonly identified barriers to fight the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic. Reducing TB stigma is essential because it hinders care seeking, contact tracing, outbreak investigations, treatment initiation, adherence and quality of care. Moreover, it deprives people with TB of their rights and the respect of others.

In collaboration with partners on global, regional and national levels, KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation has developed two stigma reduction packages within TB Photovoice project and piloted them in communities and health care facilities providing TB and TB/HIV in Kazakhstan, the Philippines and Nigeria, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

In Kazakhstan the initiative was implemented by AFEW-Kazakhstan, Sanat Alemi, and Doverie Plus.

For reference

Kazakhstan is one of the 20 high-burden countries for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The country has made great progress towards eliminating TB in recent years, with diagnosis, successful treatment and notification rates exceeding the WHO recommenrdations and the estimated incidence.

In may 2018, 12 professional participated in a “Training of trainers” course to learn how to implement TB Photovoices, 9 of whom facilitated the intervention with patients in the end. The group included 6 psychologists, a social worker and a doctor

The TB Photovoice intervention was implemented with 9 (ex-) TB patients – with a mixture of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB – some of whom were still on treatment at the time.

The final products (photos, quotes and stories) were launched and shared with the broader Almaty community in advocacy exhibitions and were also reproduced into banners, desc calendars, bads, T-shirts, and postcards to use in heath facilities when counselling new TB patients.

Symbat Sapargalieva, social worker of Sanat Alemi NGO, participant of the PhotoVoices Project

When I found out that I had tuberculosis, I felt so ashamed. There were many negative thoughts in my head. I denied my disease and was pulling away from my family and friends.

I was happy to take part in the PhotoVoices Project and then realized that I have a self-stigma. This project helped me to understand that my friends did not turn their backs on me, it was me who isolated myself from them. There was an exercise called Lifeline with TB, when I had to write down all my negative and positive thoughts. I wrote down only negative ones as I could not find any positive sides of the disease. However, two weeks after I was able to find something good about TB.

I mean, when you realize your problem deep inside and bring it out, it is such a relief. After a while, I set some goals for myself and got a job with a civil society organization to help people who were the same as me. Half of my dreams have already come true!

The main thing I realized is that if you want to change people’s opinion, change yourself. The PhotoVoices Project gave me my voice and a chance to be heard.

Sholpanata Kaldarov, student of the International IT University, participant of the PhotoVoices Project and the Self-Stigma Project, volunteer of Sanat Alemi NGO

When I was invited to take part in the PhotoVoices Project, I was still receiving my TB therapy. I said yes right away as I thought that photos could somehow provide psychological support and motivation to people who just learned that they had TB and also myself, of course.

When I was found to have TB, doctors checked everyone I had contacts with. I felt worse not even because of my own diagnosis, but because all people who were in contact with me had to be checked. Back then, I lived in a student dormitory, and even though my form of TB excluded the transmission of infection, doctors still checked about 100 students from the dormitory and 20 of my group mates. Afterwards, these people had to come to the clinic for special medical check-ups every six months. I felt guilty, so I gradually pulled away from my friends. I had self-stigma.

In the PhotoVoices Project, I experienced a lot of emotions. Before the photo is taken, you remember your past and drag the disease through yourself again. In the beginning, it was difficult to focus on details, but then I felt better and learned to openly talk about my disease.

In our group, there were patients, who already completed their treatment. Talking to them, I heard how they were able to overcome the disease. Gradually, I felt confident that I would also be able to finish my treatment successfully.

I want to thank this project, it really helps the patients who isolated themselves after the disease and lost their self-esteem.

Amanzhan Abubakirov, Teaching Assistant at the Phthisiopulmonology Department of the Kazakh National Medical University named after S.D. Asfendiyarov

Once, the head of our department invited me to take part in a project on stigma. I heard the term “stigma” before, but to be honest did not really know how it can be manifested and how it affects people. It was something new for me, so I agreed to participate.

In the course of the project, I realized that for a long time I was stigmatizing both myself and my patients. Sure, I was kind to them and treated them well, but I thought that I was a doctor and that I was better than them. I have to admit that I feel so ashamed for it.

During the project, we took part in such exercises as “Our Imperfection – Their Imperfection”, “Cross the Line” and so on. Thanks to such exercises, we were able to feel what patients feel, we were able to be in their shoes.

This project really changed my perspective, my view of the world. As a result, I built friendly relations with the patients who stay in our hospital for a long time. I stopped using any terms, which can stigmatize the patients.

More often, I talk to the patients’ relatives, tell them about stigma and ask them to provide more support to the patients.

Besides, I talk to the medical staff working at our department. As I also work at the Medical University, I devote special hours during my classes to talk about stigma and discrimination to my students.

I want to deliver the message that all people are equal, no one is better or worse. However, people with TB are real heroes. Every day, they take a lot of medicines with numerous side effects. Their spouses leave them, their friends turn their back on them, but they continue their fight.

Thank you everyone who fights TB!

 

 

 

 

 

The EECA City Health Leadership Forum

On the 6 December 2019, the EECA City Health Leadership Forum will be organized in Kyiv, Ukraine, showcasing the results of the Fast Track HIV/TB Cities Project (2017-2019)

The Forum will focus on discussing the regional context, sharing successful HIV and Tuberculosis city response models and facilitating movement towards ending these diseases in Eastern European and Central Asian (EECA) cities. It will include a Mayors’ high-level panel discussion, presentations of successful city responses and innovation to fast-track cities to 90-90-90, which will feature the inclusion of key populations in the cities’ responses. The Forum will gather over 150 delegates from 20 countries of the EECA region, including 11 city Mayors.

The Fast-Track HIV/TB Cities Project

Launched on World AIDS Day 2014, the Fast-Track Cities initiative has grown to include more than 300 cities and municipalities that are committed to attain the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets: 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status; 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART); and 90% of all HIV-diagnosed people receiving sustained ART will achieve viral suppression.

Alliance for Public Health (Ukraine) together with AFEW International (The Netherlands), licit (Switzerland) and Stop TB Partnership under technical guidance of UNAIDS EECA office with funding of The Global Fund initiated the regional Fast-Track HIV/TB Cities Project. The project was implemented between 2017-2019 and developed efficient and sustainable city models of HIV/TB responses that would allow to reduce AIDS and TB mortalities in five project cities; Almaty (Kazakhstan), Balti (Moldova), Odesa (Ukraine), Sofia (Bulgary), and Tbilisi (Georgia).

Amsterdam was one of the first to sign the Paris Declaration in 2014 and has introduced a comprehensive health policy for key populations. AFEW International with expertise on increasing access to health services for HIV, TB and viral hepatitis for key populations, is well-connected to the Municipal Public Health Service and police in the Netherlands. This expertise was shared in two training courses and a study tour.

International best practice suggests that collaborative city level models have been most effective in reducing HIV and TB burdens. The first training series, ‘Collaboration between municipalities and civil society – models and realities’, were designed as an exchange and sharing of experience and best practices in successful models of municipality and NGO partnerships. Five integrated work meetings and counselling sessions with selected project city stakeholders from municipality, health and social sector, NGOs and key populations were conducted by licit and AFEW International and improved key populations’ service access through better collaboration between relevant city stakeholders – most importantly, between municipalities and NGOs.

The second training series on innovative municipality funding approaches planned exchanged and adapted such approaches and income generating activities. The training replicated successful practices in the project cities through learning from experiences in Amsterdam. During this training the best international practices of public-private partnerships at city level and private funding for key population programmes offered inspiration for the participants of the training.

During the study tour different partners of AFEW International shared models, experiences and activities that demonstrated successes and challenges in increasing access to health for key populations. Project partners from Almaty, Kyiv and Tbilisi were provided the opportunity to connect to civil servants and different health actors within the Netherlands and discuss initiatives to reach out to key populations to increase their quality of life. Furthermore, representatives of municipality, police and NGOs working with key populations elaborated on different forms of collaboration, to prove that the only way to eliminate HIV and TB is if municipality, police and NGOs work together.

 

 

School of MSM and TG Leaders

On August 12–16, the “School of MSM and TG Leaders” was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

The objectives of this training were: to mobilize and increase the visibility of the community in the country; to create cohesion of the community itself; to create a tolerant attitude of the general population towards LGBT people.

More than 20 novice activists from different parts of Kazakhstan got new knowledge and skills to create a safe environment, maintain health and to improve the quality of life of LGBT people in the country.

“This is one of the best training I attended because it is not just a lecture but real master classes and personal experience of successful people’’ says one of the participants of the School. Indeed, the presenters – Amir Shaykezhanov – editor of www.kok.team and Elena German – program director of the Eurasian Coalition on Male Health www.ecom.ngo shared their professional experience.

The world is changing rapidly and today the most creative and innovative thinking leaders are pushing forward. The training itself and the presentation of the material were very unusual. From the beginning, the group was immersed in a creative trance – the participants were declared heroes of the Game of Thrones universe. “Five houses” – five groups of participants were engaged in the development of their unique projects for implementation in their regions. “Video blog to increase visibility”, “Community centers to support the LGBT community”, “Live libraries for anti-discrimination of HIV-positive MSM within the community”, “Improving HIV literacy among the LGBT community”, “Legal protection of the LGBT community” – during “The School” all these projects have gone all the way from the origin of the idea to a completed project application for receiving funding from the event organizers – AFEW Kazakhstan.

“We could not choose the best or most relevant topic, since all topics are important for the community,” admitted Roman Dudnik, chairman of the jury, director of AFEW Kazakhstan. As a result, the jury members – representatives of AFEW Kazakhstan and the Kazakhstan Union of PLHIV – decided to finance all projects. Teams are ready and are going to start in September.

 

 

Integrated Care Centre in Almaty – a Home for Everybody

Three months ago, the building hosting the centre – a three-story cottage – seemed huge and empty. Now it is filled with voices

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

A month ago, the first Integrated Care Centre for people in difficult life circumstances, called Revenge, was opened in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The centre was established at the initiative of the community of people living with HIV.

Invisible People

People living with HIV (PLWH), people who use drugs (PUD), those who are released from places of confinement… Those people are often left behind and ignored. They are invisible, pinned to the wall of despair, with a trail of problems that remain unresolved for years, not believing that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Now they know where they can find help. Where they will be understood and will not be neglected. Now the address 14A Omarov Street, Almaty is well known to many people. They pass it on to each other, realizing that for someone it might be the last hope.

“The centre was opened by the community, which is one of the factors attracting the potential clients. Here people can stay overnight or even live for a while until they are able to resolve their most pressing problems. The main thing is that here they are able to get a temporary registration, which is the main barrier in re-issuing the documents, getting “registered” with a healthcare facility, etc. The centre is a unique initiative and its launch was very well timed,” tells Roman Dudnik, Executive Director of AFEW Kazakhstan.

AFEW Kazakhstan supported the idea of opening the Revenge Centre within the Project “Fast-track HIV/TB responses among key populations in cities of Eastern Europe and Central Asia.” Among other initiators – activists of the Kazakhstan Network of Women Living with HIV and the Revenge Social Support Fund.

I reached the lowest point of my life

Director of the newly established centre Yelena Bilokon knows about the lives of people who practice risky behaviours not by hearsay. She was using drugs, lived in the street and has been living with HIV for 22 years. Rehabilitation centres inspired her to start a new free life. She got acquainted with the rehab clients within her community activities. When she saw the premises, the joint work, the support people provided to each other and their enlightened faces, she felt that she wanted to open her own centre.

Timurtau centre was her first success. It is a crisis centre for families called My Home, which provides assistance to many women and their children who are in trouble. The Almaty project is more large-scale.

“We have clients who have not been able to access antiretroviral treatment (ART) and, thus, to reduce their viral load and even go through medical examinations for three years or more. What can we say about migrants if even our citizens cannot receive these services? The same story is with tuberculosis patients who are left without social benefits, which they are entitled to. People are not even able to find jobs. As for children, when they get into crisis situations with their parents, they also need help, sometimes even more than adults,” says Yelena Bilokon, Director of the Kazakhstan Network of Women Living with HIV.

Up to 40 calls a day

In the centre, telephones are ringing all day long. Many people need help. The centre, in fact, is also in need of help. Kitchenware, clothes, bed linen, furniture, food… All these things are brought by good people. There was a call for help in social networks – and a lot of people responded.

Three months ago, the building hosting the centre – a three-story cottage – seemed huge and empty. Now it is filled with voices. 25 people were tested for HIV with rapid tests, 17 found jobs, 11 were examined for hepatitis and tuberculosis. It is not just statistics. Every number symbolises the struggle for someone’s health and life. Every day.

“Opening of such centre offering integrated services for vulnerable populations is an important event for our city. All the crisis centres, which existed before, had their own profiles and worked only with certain populations. People who need help cannot always find a centre offering the necessary services quickly. The Revenge Centre helps everybody,” says Alfia Denebayeva, Deputy Chief Physician of the Almaty AIDS Centre.

Workshops on case management, outreach work, stigma and discrimination delivered by medical professionals and civil society leaders help the centre clients to become volunteers. Recently a youth and adolescent club was opened in the centre, with many guests coming for the opening ceremony. In fact, they are not called guests here – those are our friends and allies, and their number is growing day by day.

AFEW Builds Models for the Future with Improved TB/HIV Care

AFEW, Hivos and PharmAccess and KNCV representatives after the presentation on the Dutch congress ‘Soa.Hiv.Seks’

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

The ‘Improved TB/HIV Prevention & Care – Building Models for the Future’ project was presented during the Dutch National Congress ‘Soa.Hiv.Seks’ on 1 December 2017 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Three working models from Kazakhstan, the Philippines, and Nigeria implemented by AFEW, Hivos and PharmAccess with KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation as the lead agency were shown to the Congress audience.

HIV and TB are two of the biggest public health threats in the world. Mounting challenges associated with these mutually reinforcing diseases are both medical and socio-political. In the efforts to address many of the common challenges, AFEW, HIVOS, PharmAccess and KNCV, with support from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, collaborate in different parts of the world via the ‘Improved TB/HIV prevention and care-building models for the future’ alliance to jointly design and pilot innovative models of cooperation between the public, private and community sectors involved in the fight against HIV and TB, to find new ways of ensuring and expanding affordable, patient-centred and high quality access to care for key affected populations.

“After the project has started in Almaty, Kazakhstan, we can observe positive changes. A patient has information about good quality care, knows where to go for treatment and support, and has a choice in seeking care in the public sector, private sector and civil society,” the executive director of AFEW International Anke van Dam is saying. “Self-support groups and client management for TB patients are being organized and the HIV and TB working group is supported by the head of the Almaty City Health Department.”

Private clinics in Kazakhstan are now engaged in the public healthcare sector. They are integrated into the national monitoring and evaluation system for public/non-public TB/HIV care provision in Almaty city.

In Kazakhstan Students Debated on HIV

Author: Marina Maksimova, Kazakhstan

Opening ceremony of the first international debate tournament in Almaty “SpeakUp: AIDS”

Over 400 students from universities of the CIS countries took part in the first international debate tournament on HIV “SpeakUp: AIDS” in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

“Almaty is the city of students and active young people, who are interested in gaining knowledge, in particular in the area of healthy lifestyle and HIV prevention. Out of 5 000 people living with HIV in Almaty one-third is young people. Our city has a tradition to conduct spectacular campaigns dedicated to the World AIDS Day. This year, it was the first time we held debates on this topic among young people,” said Murat Daribayev, deputy akim (akim  is the head of a local government in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan – note of editor) of Almaty.

Among the debate participants, there was the best 2017 speaker in the world representing the international debate movement, the main judge Raffy Marshall (Oxford), students from the major higher educational institutions of the country as well as from the UK, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Sweden. The international panel selected 120 teams to take part in debates on this critical social issue. The tournament was held in line with the British parliament model.

The right to argue

Aleksandr Semenov, a student of the law department at the Kazakh National University is not a newbie in the debate movement. For the seventh year in a row, he wins his right to take part in the debates. He got through to the final round ten times, won five tournaments and even trained other debaters.

“The debates are a separate culture. It is sort of a recharger for your brain to always keep you thinking and analyzing to be able to assess a problem from various points of view. Additionally, you have to do it as fast as possible. The topics are always different: politics, culture, religion, sports… It was the first time when we had our debates on HIV. Therefore, the first conclusion is that we cannot keep silent, we should talk about it and ruin the stereotypes. Young people may be the opinion leaders,” says Aleksandr.

There are two people on his team: he and Altynay Dzhumasheva, a student of the American University of Central Asia from Kyrgyzstan. For debaters, it is not important which country or university the team members represent, the main thing is the efficiency of their joint efforts, mutual support, ability to swiftly catch the idea voiced by the partner and develop it in an emotional and convincing manner.

Stronger arguments

At the tournament, the debaters could use any of the three languages: English, Kazakh or Russian. The organizers selected several key topics. They included digitalization of the health care, drug use problems, sexual education, HIV and children, stigma and discrimination of people living with HIV. The participants were to be competent in all the topics.

“One of the rounds addressed the topic of drug addiction. What should change in the countries and in minds to give information about drugs and for drug users to have a choice of treatment and rehabilitation options? Our “opposition” team had to resist a storm of arguments from the “government.” Finally, the victory was ours! Our arguments on the need to adopt an efficient state drug policy and open state rehabilitation centres appeared to be stronger,” tells Altynay Dzhumasheva.

Counting on the young people

Debates among young people in Kazakhstan are a new instrument in response to AIDS. Organizers of the debates included the local Almaty administration, the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republican AIDS Center, the Health Department of Almaty, UNAIDS, and UNICEF.

Search for the new formats of HIV prevention among young people is an important topic to be discussed at the International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam.

“Kazakhstan has already started its preparations to declare the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. We hope that information about HIV will continue to be accessible and accurate. The progress we have achieved has been to a great extent made possible thanks to people not being silent and youth being actively engaged,” HIV/AIDS Specialist from UNICEF Ruslan Malyuta is saying.

The winner of the English league of the first international debate tournament on HIV was a team from the People’s Friendship University of Russia. The best team in the Kazakh league was from the Taraz State University (Kazakhstan), and in the Russian league – from the Eurasian National University (Astana).

The First AFEW Regional Autumn School Was Conducted in Kazakhstan

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

Representatives of 10 countries took part in the first regional autumn school organized by AFEW, which was held from 30 October to 5 November in the Oy-Karagay gorge, not far from Almaty, Kazakhstan. The school was conducted with the support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

High mountains, hot sun, picturesque autumn landscapes, atmosphere of the national yurt instead of the traditional training hall – combined with the team spirit and expectations of positive changes – contributed to the creative atmosphere of the event. The school participants included representatives of the AFEW network from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Netherlands, Tajikistan, Ukraine, sub-grantees of the project ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations,’ and partner organizations. Such allies and friends are the biggest guarantee of success.

Learning to bridge the gaps

“The autumn school helps to find the answers to a range of questions and get acquainted with the new innovative practices in working with key populations,” says Dilshod Pulatov, Project Manager, ‘Bridging the Gaps’ programme, AFEW-Tajikistan.

He presented the results of the social study to assess the level of labour migration among people who use drugs. It was conducted for 18 months in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. The study, which covered 600 respondents, demonstrated regional trends and showed interesting results. The main of them is that the labour migrants who use drugs do not know where they can get help and who can offer such help. In both countries, the respondents pointed out that as labour migrants they experienced problems with access to health and social services.

The results of this research study will help AFEW to scale up the access of drug users to quality HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services and find new partners. Partnerships were created right at the discussion platform. This study proved to be interesting not only to the participants, but also to the guests invited to take part in the autumn school, including representatives of the Project HOPE in Kazakhstan.

Platform for discussion and activism

Today, ‘Bridging the Gaps’ programme is implemented by the organizations from four countries of the region. The autumn school became a platform to discuss strategies, barriers, innovations, and opportunities for cooperation.

“In our country, the biggest gap is an access of underage people who use drugs (PUD) to services. Many services are offered to adult PUD, in particular with support of the international donors. It allows them getting qualified help. At the same time, people often forget that the first experience of drug use happens under the age of 18,” tells Anastasia Shebardina, Project Manager, AFEW-Ukraine.

The project made an important contribution for radically changing the situation: it opened the only rehab centre for drug dependent adolescents in Chernivtsi and supported four civil society organizations.

In each country, there are success stories, which became possible thanks to the project implementation. So far, these are just tiny steps forward in the big scope of the existing problems. Every such step became possible thanks to project staff and activists working hard for a long time, but such victories, even if they are small, enhance personal motivation of people and allow them to set bigger goals.

“One of our achievements is developing the standards of services for PUD serving sentences in the Georgian prisons. We educate prison staff and have drafted a special training module for this purpose. In some organizations, support groups for PUD are already functioning. Rehab centre Help has opened its doors to clients. Now 12 people can stay there and get qualified help. We plan to cover all correctional facilities in the country with our activities,” shares his plans Vazha Kasrelishvili, Project Coordinator of the NGO Tanadgoma.

From knowledge sharing to new rehabilitation models

Sharing knowledge and best practices is one of the goals of the autumn school. Together, it is easier to elaborate strategies and innovative approaches, considering that the tendencies in development of the situation in the region are similar. Today, the search to fund vital projects also requires joint efforts, taking into account the reduction of the funding received from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and other donors in the region. So far, national governments are not ready to take over this financial burden in full scope. Despite their broad fundraising efforts, civil society organizations do not have enough grant funds aimed at scaling up access to services for key populations.

“With the support of the Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic, within our project we developed two clinical guidelines: on managing pregnancy, delivery and postnatal period of female PUD and on mental health and behaviour disorders in children and adolescents caused by the use of new psychoactive substances. We were able to open a social office for women with HIV, which offers counselling of psychologists and peer consultants. In the country, there are two rehab centres for women with HIV and drug dependence, which cooperate with friendly clinics,” tells Natalya Shumskaya, the head of the AIDS Foundation East-West in the Kyrgyz Republic.

Today, there is a need to use new, more effective rehabilitation models. This idea has been supported by all participants of the autumn school. Such models should be aimed at developing inner strength – empowerment – of each of the members of key populations.

“Maybe now it is time to change and expand our understanding of the rehabilitation concept. It is not only detox and psychology. There should be equal opportunities, in particular based on harm reduction, to accept yourself,” points out Anna Sarang, President of Andrey Rylkov Foundation, Russia.

Preparations to AIDS 2018

Participants of the autumn school also discussed preparations to the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands – the main event of the next year for activists of the AIDS organizations. All countries of the Eastern Europe and Central Asia are already actively preparing for the conference. How can decision makers be involved into this crucial event? What channels are most effective in communicating information about the conference? How to make this event significant? Every day, participants of the autumn school discussed these and other questions. Besides, they learned how to write abstracts for the conference and choose catchy titles for them.

It is very important that the participants developed some new ideas, concepts and thoughts, because starting from 1 December 2017 registration for AIDS 2018 will be open. It will be a new and diverse platform for discussions making decisions significant for all countries and communities.

Improving TB/HIV Prevention and Care in Kazakhstan

Kristina from Almaty, Kazakhstan was diagnosed with HIV when she was in prison. At first, the woman got scared because she did not know how to live with this diagnosis. Now the woman is the volunteer of the organisation ‘Doverie Plus.’ She advises girls on how to be adherent to the treatment, motivates to start the treatment, and conducts other various activities.

“My life was pretty hard until I met Alla and Roza from the fund ‘Doverie Plus.’ They explained me a lot and supported me. Before I met them, I did not know anything about antiretroviral therapy (ART) therapy, and how it affects HIV virus. They told me I had to take it, and I was taking it, but every day I took it in a different time, without knowing that I had to take it in the same time every day. Now I know that I have to have the regime with my medicine and I have to take it every day in the same time. I achieved a viral load of less than 500 copies. Before meeting Alla and Roza, I was often tired of my life. After our talks, I felt much better. I want to live, I am living, and I will be living,” Kristina says.

Public Fund ‘Doverie Plus’ is working within the project ‘Improved TB/HIV Prevention & Care – Building Models for the Future.’ The fourth year of the project is starting in October 2017. Launched three years ago, the project is aimed at establishing an effective partnership between public and non-public TB and HIV care providers in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

STOP TB partnership is established

“The project is unique in terms of the community involvement, strengthening, increasing capacity of community based NGOs, and building strong inter-sectorial collaboration in Almaty. All big achievements are built from little efforts. The little effort was done to improve the access to services for key populations on the city level and we succeeded,” the Executive Director of Public Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan” Roman Dudnik is sharing. “We have a strong NGO Network, and it is linking with all existent service providers. In the end, all people in need have the possibility to get services related to HIV and TB. We plan to develop this approach further, and we want to increase the capacity and knowledge level of all stakeholders, including NGOs, state and private medical clinics. This project should become the best practice model for other cities of Kazakhstan and our neighboring countries.”

The project ‘Improved TB/HIV Prevention & Care – Building Models for the Future’ is aimed at increasing government recognition of the role and quality of the non-public sector for TB/HIV service delivery, providing TB/HIV services according to agreed standards, encouraging civil society to be the active participant in monitoring quality of services, ensuring that clients have affordable options and trust in service provision, stronger linkages between government, project and civil society.

“During three years of our work, we achieved understanding of the integrated TB/HIV care model among key stakeholders and gained strong political commitment and support from healthcare department of Almaty through establishment of the platform for partners’ dialogue,” a project manager of AFEW Kazakhstan Kristina Zhorayeva is saying. “We also established STOP TB partnership for the effective coordination and collaboration between all partners working in TB and HIV areas. Private clinics are now integrated with TB and project services, and thus the number of private clinics that are eligible to provide tuberculosis care is increasing. Besides, healthcare authorities of Almaty recognized the importance of project interventions directed to strengthening the role of local NGOs in provision of TB and HIV care. With their understanding, we have created the working group on HIV and TB.”

Created first NGO in the city for TB patients

One of the biggest achievements of the project is the creation of community based NGO. It is the first NGO in Almaty city aiming its activity on TB patients and their environment. Their start up showed successful work on self-support group and client management for TB patients. The Public Foundation ‘Sanat Alemi’ has the following activities: social mobilization, advocacy, communication of people affected by tuberculosis, TB/HIV, AIDS and other socially significant diseases, reducing stigma, discrimination and develop commitment to effective prevention methods, diagnostic, drug management and treatment.

The founders of ‘Sanat Alemi’ are people who were successfully cured of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant TB. In addition, one of the founders is an independent expert on TB, has extensive experience in treatment, drug supply, monitoring and organization of TB-based activities nationally.

“The social support for tuberculosis patients plays a key role in increasing adherence to the treatment. The success in treatment is possible with the combination of trust, human relationships and the support of professionals, such as a psychologist and social worker,” the director of public foundation Sanat Alemi Roza Idrisova is saying.

The project ‘Improved TB/HIV Prevention & Care – Building Models for the Future’ is implemented with the support from the Dutch Government (DGIS), KNCV and its partners, AFEW International, HIVOS and PharmAccess.

Kazakh Beauties Played Football for the Sake of Fighting with AIDS

Many students, young workers and musicians decided to check their HIV status

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

Football, rock, celebrities! Youth initiative called #ЖОКСПИД2030 (#NOAIDS2030) is taking place in Kazakhstan. The founders of this initiative are the Republican AIDS Centre, the Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV (PLH), and the Kazakh Union of people living with HIV.

“With this #ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative, we want to save the memory of those who died from the epidemic. We want to draw the attention of public and youth in particular to the deaths, stigma and discrimination of people living with HIV. We want to give an opportunity to think about the problem that may affect anyone. This is why people should take responsibility for their health and the health of their close ones,” says Nurali Amanzholov, the president of the Central Asian Association of people living with HIV and Kazakh Union of people living with HIV.

Beauties on… the football field

The initiative started in May 2017 on the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial with a mini-football blitz tournament in Almaty. The members of the team were not professional sportsmen and muscular men, but delicate and the most beautiful girls in the country – the finalists of the beauty contests, popular singers and journalists. However, girls’ mentors were real football professionals, including sportsman-composer Abdulkarim Karimov and renowned players Zharko Markovich and Bauyrzhan Turysbek from Kayrat team.

Most beautiful girls in the country – the finalists of the beauty contests, popular singers and journalists – played football during the event

Beauty does not only heal, but also attacks. Girls played desperately, boldly, with an excitement, no one wanted to give in the victory. Neither spoiled makeup, nor broken fingernails, or even injured knees could get the girls to stop playing even for a minute. Women’s football is beautiful and strong. This was exactly what men, who liked the tournament, thought about it.

“Girls played dramatically and proved that they can play this manly game not worse than guys. I especially noted the fearless goalkeepers,” said Abdulkarim Karimov, who could not keep his emotions and sympathies to himself.

In this stubborn struggle, the team of journalists won the first place; show-business representatives placed the second, “Miss Almaty” and “Miss Kazakhstan” teams placed the third.

Media is everywhere

“#ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative is yet another opportunity to demonstrate the readiness and the will to counteract the future spread of HIV infection. We can stop and even reverse the epidemic with a set of measures: prophylaxis, providing access to treatment for all who need it, fighting stigma, and, of course, the active involvement of public attention to the problem of HIV infection,” Bauyrzhan Bayserkin, the CEO of the Republican Center for AIDS Prevention and Control notes.

#ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative is another opportunity to demonstrate the readiness and the will to counteract the future spread of HIV infection

It will not be possible to attract public attention without media. Therefore, some participants of the initiative were journalists. Media employees were on the training in Astana where they were taught by media trainers and experts about professional media coverage on HIV topics: the usage of correct terminology, interviewing ethics of people living with HIV, and selecting actual informational materials. Participants received a lot of important information from volunteers and outreach-employees who provide legal and social support to people living with HIV and drug users.

Practically a quarter of all HIV infection cases are infected young people aged 20-29. What should the prophylaxis for this age group be like, so that it would not leave anybody indifferent and eventually stop the epidemic spread? This important topic will be discussed on the 22nd International AIDS 2018 Conference in Amsterdam.

Rock songs on dombra

Immortal songs of Victor Tsoi – 80s rock legend – sounded in new adaptation on the musician’s birthday (the idol of millions would have been 55). It was also the anniversary of the “Needle” movie made in Almaty. The performers were not professionals, but amateurs. However, this fact did not lower the emotional heat and expression. Victor Tsoi’s greatest hits were performed with the accompaniment of guitars, the orchestra and even in the genre of opera. Rock songs played on Kazakh national instrument dombra was the most spectacular performance.

Tsoi’s hits were performed Rock songs on Kazakh national instrument dombra

In this creative and positive atmosphere, the organizers of the republican initiative #ЖОКСПИД2030 introduced a commissar to the participants. Ali Okapov, the popular singer and musician has become the commissary.

“To be a commissary on such an important social campaign is a great honour for me. As well as to promote healthy lifestyle ideology among young people. Future starts today. These are not just words. The future belongs to young people, but we should build it now, and it is definitely the future without HIV!” Ali Okapov is saying.

“Almaty – the city without HIV” is another recent event within the framework of the initiative. It was organized by Almaty HIV Centre, Public Foundation «AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan», Kazakh Union of people living with HIV, social foundation “Doverie Plus” (“Trust Plus”.) People living with HIV told their stories in the atmosphere of openness and trust. Young people took part in the quiz on the knowledge of HIV infection. The doctors informed about the preventive measures. The event ended in massive HIV express-testing. Many students, young workers and musicians decided to check their HIV status. The live queue did not even pay attention to the intense southern sunlight.

Almaty is the first city in Central Asia to sign the Paris Declaration

Paris Declaration in Almaty was signed by Deputy Akim of Almaty city Murat Daribaev and UNAIDS Director in the Republic of Kazakhstan Alexander Goleusov

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

The world movement, which already includes more than 70 major cities around the world, has reached Central Asia. The first city, whose authorities signed Paris Declaration with an appeal to stop AIDS epidemic on July 20, 2017, was Almaty. Signing of the declaration became possible and was organized within the framework of the project “Fast-Track TB/HIV Responses for Key Populations in EECA cities”, implemented by AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan.

Almaty is the largest city in Kazakhstan. It is cultural, financial and economic centre of the republic with a population of more than 1.7 million people. For many years it was the capital of the country. The megapolis, along with Pavlodar and Karaganda regions, has the highest rate of HIV infection in the country. Therefore, signing Paris Declaration gives Almaty opportunity and hope to improve the sad situation.

“This fact will undoubtedly attract city residents’ attention to HIV issues. People will get tested more actively, and will start their treatment in time if necessary. Almaty will participate in international health events and will have access to the most advanced achievements and developments in the field of HIV and AIDS. The best world practices will be included into the City Improvement Plan on HIV and tuberculosis until 2023. This will stop the growth of HIV epidemic and improve population’s health,” Valikhan Akhmetov, the head of the Almaty Public Health Department said during the ceremony of signing the declaration.

Sexual transmission of HIV increases

Today, there are more than five thousand registered HIV cases in the city. A quarter of the cases is observed among internal and cross-border migrants. For many years, the main route of transmission was parenteral. To stabilize the situation, the Akimat (regional executive body in Kazakhstan – editor’s comment) has introduced harm reduction programs targeted to key populations: people who inject drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with men. There are 18 syringe exchange points in the city and six friendly cabinets at polyclinics. This year, despite strong public confrontation, site for substitution therapy has been launched.

The trend of the HIV infection spread has changed dramatically in recent years. Today, the sexual transmission is already 65%. Infection, as doctors say, is now targeting general population, but people are still not aware of it and live as if it has nothing to do with them.

“It is very difficult for people from secured families and those who have good jobs to accept the positive HIV status. Women who live in a civil marriage, refuse to name their sexual partners. There can be another situation: imagine a girl coming to us with her mother, who claims that her daughter is a pure child, and she simply cannot have HIV infection,” Alfiya Denebaeva, deputy head physician of the Center for Prevention and Control of AIDS in Almaty is saying.

Some pregnant HIV-positive women do not take antiretroviral therapy (ART) because of the disbelief. Several years ago, there were cases in the city where mothers who did not believe in HIV-infection refused to take medicine, and their infants then died. Now there is an occasion to discuss this topic at the 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 in Amsterdam, in which participants from Kazakhstan will also take part.

Regardless of what was mentioned before, Kazakhstani doctors manage to achieve high results. 99 percent of HIV-positive women give births to healthy children. There are several cases when HIV-positive women become mothers for the second and even third time. It is mostly possible thanks to mandatory two-time testing of every pregnant woman when timely diagnosis and starting of ART is possible to establish.

Almost 90% of PLHIV, who need treatment, receive ART

Regional Director of UNAIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Vinay Saldana

In Almaty, testing and treatment of HIV infection is possible at the expense of the city and republican budgets. Back in 2009, the country was the first in Central Asia to start purchasing ARV drugs for adults and children. Today Almaty is the leader: more than 88% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in need of ART, receive this treatment. This figure is higher than the same figure in the republic by eight percent. The megapolis is much closer to achieving AIDS targets 90-90-90 than any other city in the country: 90% of people living with HIV should be aware of their HIV status; 90% of people who are aware of their positive HIV status should receive antiretroviral treatment; and 90% of people receiving treatment should have a suppressed viral load that will allow them to stay healthy and reduce the risk of HIV transmission.

Another statistic data is showing the advantages of life-saving therapy. The effectiveness of treatment for PLHIV is more than 76%. Thanks to the early beginning of ART, there has been a 20% decrease in new tuberculosis cases among HIV-positive people. This is a very important achievement because the combination of HIV and tuberculosis infections is the main cause of death among PLHIV. Over the past year, this number has increased by 20%. The main reasons for this are late detection of HIV and amnestied patients, who arrive home from places of detention in critical condition. In every third case, the death was inevitable due to the specifics of the damage of the immune system and other organs. Mostly it was cancer or general body atrophy.

“Thanks to United Nations assistance, Kazakhstan has developed a new mechanism for purchasing ARV drugs. Only three years ago, we were spending several thousand dollars per year for a single patient. Now this cost is reduced to the minimum. Therefore, previously we could not advise people living with HIV to start treatment immediately, but now this treatment is available to everyone,” Vinay Saldana, Regional Director of UNAIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia is saying.