New Technologies and Youth Sexuality Education in Georgia

Author: Gvantsa Khizanishvili, Georgia

Improving access to and awareness of health issues among youth using new technologies has become a new way for non-profit sectors around the world to advance issues on their agenda. IntiMate by Bemoni is the first application of such type in Georgia, and it is an excellent example of sexuality education using innovative technologies. It is available for download both by App store and Google play. The app has been developed by Public Union Bemoni as a part of the project “Investing in Sexual and Reproductive Health Promotion and HIV Prevention among Young People in Georgia”.

Non-profit for sex education

Georgia has inadequate policies in the area of sexual and reproductive health and rights. There are strong religious and conservative powers and gender inequality in addition to a fragile civil society that especially influences the lives of adolescents and young people. Much progress has been made in recent years in advocacy to advance youth sexual and reproductive health and rights, for example. In May of 2017, the Georgian Ministry of Education and Science signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the United Nations (UN) Joint Programme for Gender Equality to assist the ongoing revision of the national curriculum and help integrate the issues of human rights, gender equality and healthy living into the educational programme. Additionally, this February, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Georgia initiated an interactive learning module for evidence-based family planning called Virtual Contraception Consultation (ViC), which was introduced at Tbilisi State Medical University.

Despite these advances, there are still many gaps in advancing youth sexual and reproductive health and rights for young people. For example, there are no state supported sex education programs that exist in many countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia including Georgia. Since there is no state supported sex education programs including information about HIV/AIDS, no information targeted specifically at young people is available, and health service providers are not equipped with the skills to meet young people’s needs for information, counselling and confidentiality of services. Therefore, the non-formal education mostly led by non-profit sector play a significant role in youth sex education.

New ways to raise awareness

The IntiMate app aims to improve knowledge of young people around issues of sexual and reproductive health and rights including HIV/AIDS. With the goal to spark the conversation around the issues, by containing easily comprehensible, fun, attractive content and to encourage participation of young people in prevention of HIV/AIDS. Containing quiz games, video information, definitions, calendar, list of youth friendly services among others, now young people in Georgia will have access reliable information on sexual health and wellbeing at their fingertips. Launched in July 2017, it already has already attracted international media attention.

Russia is Dancing for Life

Author: Anastasia Petrova, Russia

“Congratulations to “FOCUS-MEDIA” and dance4life for the victory in presidential grants competition!” This was the message Ekaterina Artemenko, the coordinator of projects in Moscow “FOCUS Media” foundation, got from her colleague around midnight on July 31. The happy news spread quickly and all danc4life project members knew about it the next day. The initiative was supported this year by the Presidential Grant Foundation.

Starting from 2006, non-commercial organizations in Russia are supported by the president. This was the first year of the presidential grant competition. For 10-year existence, the system of finance distribution was quite complicated: at first the head of the state approved the list of non-commercial organizations (NCO) – the receivers of grants with his decree, and then the NCOs were included into the finance distribution system. In 2017, the procedure was simplified: grant participants may apply online. There has appeared the unified operator – presidential grant foundation.

Coordination committee summed up the results of the first competition on 31 July, 2017. There were 970 NCOs-winners from 79 regions in the winner list, which is around 15% of all applications. There were 6,623 projects that participated in the competition. Three Russian NCOs, included in the register as “foreign agents,” are among presidential grants recipients. Operator has distributed grants with the total sum of 2.25 billion Russian Rubles within the first competition. The most financed project among the 12 grant departments was “Citizen Health Protection, Promotion of Healthy Lifestyle.”

Recognition of merit

Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS -MEDIA” celebrated its 20th anniversary last year. “We are happy to have received this grant, but frankly, we are also a bit surprised,” the employees of the foundation are saying.

There is a lot of work ahead even after receiving the grant. Financing will allow to run the project dance4life in 14 Russian cities. It will also include a module on tobacco addiction prophylaxis and anti-tobacco campaigns. Besides, the project will include additional component in the form of helping teenagers and young people with HIV. They will be able to volunteer in the project and take part in all of the activities.

Dancing is a universal language

Dance4life project, which won the grant, is a unique international initiative. The initiative aims at promotion of healthy lifestyle among young people, preservation and promotion of reproductive health, HIV infection prevention and many more socially important diseases. More than two million people from 20 different countries have been a part of the programme over the years of its existence.

The project started in 2005 in Russia. It began after “FOCUS Media” Foundation director Evgenia Alekseeva met the Dutch creator of the project Ilco van der Linde. After this meeting, she decided to take this international initiative to Russia. “FOCUS Media” Foundation existed for seven years by that time, dealt with health protection and, in particular, with AIDS prophylaxis among youth. That is why the aim of the project (which includes the prophylaxis of socially important diseases, addiction formation and strengthening young people) coincided with the foundation’s activity.

Now dance4life is a project with 12-year-old history in Russia, and it runs in more than 14 regions. During the years of its activity, it managed to involve around 220,000 young people, who say that dance4life has changed their lives. The keys to the uniqueness of the project are youth culture, energy and creativity that help spread the information on preserving health and taking responsibility for one’s life. Dancing as a part of the project is a universal language, connecting dance4life participants from all over the world.

The results will be presented on AIDS 2018

There were some guests in the ““FOCUS -MEDIA” Foundation office a week before receiving the news about winning the grant. Yulia Koval-Molodtsova, a former project coordinator in Russia and now an associate in the main dance4life office in the Netherlands, came to Russia to talk about the new working models.

After running the same programme since 2005, the international dance4life team has been working on the analysis and improvement of the project methodology. While the old working model made an accent on youth education, the new programme aims at self-realization of society. Now the programme invites young people on a journey: from relationship with oneself, to the relationships with partners and society in general. The components of HIV and sexually-transmitted infections (STI) prophylaxis, issues of contraception and gender equality are now skillfully connected with such important for young people topics: self-knowledge, establishment of personal boundaries, and control of social stereotypes. The principles of work have not changed: to inspire, teach, involve and celebrate. Due to the “peer to peer” approach, young people become the driving force of the project.

New model of work will be approved during this year. The pilot project is running in two regions. In Nizhny Novgorod, where the project is successfully running from the start, they work in cooperation with local schools. The new contacts will be established from scratch in Kolomna, a city in Moscow region, where dance4life is just starting. The model of the project is universal and can be used for both learning and leisure purposes of young people.

Even though the project will be financed by the Presidential Foundation till the end of 2018, the managers of the project would like to sum up the first results of work by next summer. The results of work and experience in the area of HIV/AIDS among youth will be introduced on the International AIDS Conference in 2018. The focus of this conference will be on Eastern European and Central Asian countries.

Tuberculosis and HIV are the “Imported” Diseases of Migrants

Author: Nargis Hamrabayeva, Tajikistan

A big amount of working age population in Tajikistan (where the entire population is eight million people) take part in labour migration to Russia. After their return to homeland, migrants get diagnosed with tuberculosis and HIV.

A 32-year-old labour migrant from Tajikistan named Shody has just returned from Russia. The doctors have diagnosed him with tuberculosis. The man states that he spent six years working in Russia. He went back home only a couple of times during that period.

The fear of deportation – reason for tuberculosis

“I worked at the construction site. Along with several other fellow countrymen we lived in damp and cold premises. A year ago, I started feeling weak, suffered from continuous coughing, but did not seek any medical advice. First of all, I did not have spare money, and secondly, I was afraid to lose my job. If I was diagnosed with tuberculosis, I would have been deported. Who would take care of my family then? Every day I felt weaker and weaker and I had to buy the ticket home,” told the migrant. Now Shody gets the necessary treatment according to the anti-tuberculosis programme, and his health is getting better.

A few years ago, the results of the research on tuberculosis spread prevention were revealed in Dushanbe. These results have shown that hundreds of Tajik migrants return from Russia with tuberculosis.

Experts say that around 20%, or every fifth patient, from the newly diagnosed patients turn out to be labour migrants.

“For instance, in 2015, 1007 people (which is 19.7% cases from the entire number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis) were labour migrants. In 2016 there were 927 or more than 17%,” Zoirdzhon Abduloyev, the deputy director of the Republican Centre of Population Protection from Tuberculosis in Tajikistan says.

According to him, the research has shown that most of the migrants became infected during their labour migration period.

“The main factors that lead to the spread of this disease among migrants are the poor living conditions. Big amounts of people in small areas, unsanitary conditions and poor nutrition, late visits to the doctors, and most importantly the fear of deportation from Russia,” says Abduloyev.

HIV is “brought” due to the migration

Many experts say the same thing about the spread of HIV in Tajikistan. That “it is being brought from there, due to the migration.”

Dilshod Sayburkhanov, deputy director of the Republican HIV/AIDS centre in Tajikistan, says that big number of Tajik migrants go to work in countries with significantly higher HIV prevalence rate compared to Tajikistan. Usually these are seasonal migrations, and after the end of the season migrants come home.

“Official statistical data shows the dynamical growth of the number of people who have been in labour migration among the new cases of HIV in Tajikistan. In 2015, there were 165 people diagnosed with HIV, whose tests were marked under the labour migrant category. Among them there were 151 men and 14 women, which is 14.3% from the whole number of new HIV cases. In 2016 – 155 (14.8%), in the first half of 2017 – 82 people (13.1%). In 2012, 65 migrants (7.7%) were diagnosed as HIV-positive,” says Sayburkhanov.

Statistics demonstrates the connection between international Tajik labour migration and the growth of new identified HIV cases, according to him.

Ulugbek Aminov, state UNAIDS manager in Tajikistan, also agrees with this. He thinks that migration and HIV are closely connected and result in a social phenomenon.

“There is an assumption that migrants, being in tough emotional and physical conditions, can behave insecurely in terms of HIV and thus have risks of the virus transmission in destination countries. Tajikistan HIV import issue is still in need of an in-depth study,” believes Ulugbek.

It is important to consider that migrants often represent vulnerable to HIV groups of population (for example people who inject drugs), and not knowing their pre-migration HIV status complicates the future process of HIV monitoring. Apart from that, the chances for migrant to receive the necessary specialized treatment go down. The treatment would prevent the spread of HIV to migrant wives and partners in their home country.

“Therefore, experts’ first priority task is the timely identification and quality monitoring of the disease in the countries where migrant live and transfer to, until the return of the migrant back home,” notes Ulugbek Aminov.

Experts believe that there should be a complex of prevention activities for HIV, sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among such vulnerable groups as migrants and their sexual partners.

The Path to the Self-Financing of the HIV Programmes in Kyrgyzstan

Author: Olga Ochneva, Kyrgyzstan

A significant reduction of funding for the programs against HIV infection was registered during the recent years in Kyrgyzstan. Last year the news that the Global Fund – the main donor of the HIV and tuberculosis programmes in the country – cuts their funding, got into the headlines.

Needs and opportunities

Funding for HIV programmes from the Global Fund over the past two years in the country has actually decreased by 30%, from $7.5 million in 2014 to $5 million in 2016 and 2017. The trend continues to grow: in the application for 2018-2020 only $3.7 million per year were pre-approved, and that is one more million less than before.

“$7.8 million per year are divided in the new Global Fund application between HIV and tuberculosis, but previously such amount of money was allocated only for HIV. Notice that reduction of funding comes amid the growth of demands. The situation with HIV in the country is now getting close to the concentrated phase, and the number of people on treatment over the past two years has grown almost twice,” said the head of Harm reduction programmes association “Partner Network” Aybar Sultangaziyev. “We have enough funds for this year, but in the next three years we expect the budget gap to grow. Only for persons who need treatment – about 6,000 people – we need $3.5 million by 2020, but for HIV we only have $3.7 million allocated in the budget.”

From donor to national funding

The general global trend of reducing grant support and the rise of Kyrgyzstan in the qualification of the World Bank from the level of countries with low income to the level of countries with lower middle income encourages the transition of the country to national funding. It is a difficult process for the state, because from the very beginning the prevention programmes in the country (about 15 years) were funded by international donors.

Ulan Kadyrbekov

“Previously money from the state budget was allocated only to support infrastructure and salaries of the AIDS-service employees,” Director of the Republican AIDS-center Ulan Kadyrbekov says. “Starting from the year before last, the state started to allocate 20 million soms ($289 thousand) annually for HIV programmes. The condition of awarding $11 million grant for HIV from the Global Fund for the next three years was the state contribution of 15% of the whole grant amount. Nowadays we set the national program on overcoming HIV in the Kyrgyz Republic until 2021 and in the budget we have allocated these 15% of the national contribution.”

Until the last November it was not clear if Kyrgyzstan receives the Global Fund money or not. This fact became the main argument for the civil sector in their work on promotion of national funding.

“In fact, the result of our work was the development of the roadmap, i.e. the transition plan to national funding, which comes as an addition to the National program on overcoming HIV,” says Aybar Sultangaziev. “In addition to already allocated budget we have received further 23 mln. soms ($333 thousand) in 2018 and 50 million soms ($725 thousand) per year starting from 2019. It is still not enough. In fact, we requested up to 4.5 times more in 2018 and 2.5 times more starting from 2019 from the state budget.”

Now the National program for overcoming HIV in the Kyrgyz Republic until 2021 and Roadmap for the transition to national funding are submitted to the Government of Kyrgyzstan. The program must be approved this August. It will become known if this money is included in the Republican budget by the end of 2017.

Costs saving and optimization

Upon the condition that the government will fulfill the financial obligations under the National program until 2021 and the country will receive donor funds, there still will be a deficit in the amount of $1.5 million per year. Global Fund’s money has not been finally divided between programme activities. It will be decided which expenditure headings will be underfunded in the nearest future.

Aybar Sultangaziev

“We expect that deficits will be covered by funding from the other donors and by reduction of preventive measures,” Aybar Sultangaziev is saying. “For example, it is likely that we will close social centers. Nowadays six social centers are already closed, we excluded the treatment of STIs (sexually transmitted infections – ed.), we also partly excluded diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections, we decreased the number of condoms and syringes for distribution. There are other donors for HIV in our country, the largest of which is the USAID project Flagship. It allocates about $700 thousand a year on drug users. With this money we are able to cut funds from the budget of the Global Fund for this group. Now we have a narrower task of responding to the epidemic. Therefore, the only must have budget items are methadone and antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. We are trying to increase or at least keep these budget lines at the same level.”

Another step in cost optimization and in the transition to national funding is the transfer of control of Global Fund grants from the current recipient – UNDP – to the Ministry of health. Experts predict that it will happen no earlier than during the second half of 2018, as the Ministry of health needs to get prepared.

“Nowadays the treatment is provided by the Global Fund. Even after funds were allocated in the national budget, we still cannot use them for the purchase of ARVs for key vulnerable groups, because there is no mechanism for procurement of drugs and for social procurement. Our priority is to provide all the necessary documents for these procedures,” Ulan Kadyrbekov said. “Thanks to funds reallocation and optimum employment of resources, the National programme for the next three years will be able to slow down the spread of HIV. Even now we have good chances to reach the 2020 UNAIDS goals of 90-90-90. The process of transition to national funding and running programs in the face of cutbacks of donor funding is a great challenge. The Ministry of Health has already submitted the preliminary topics of presentations at the conference AIDS 2018 in Amsterdam, I think, by July of the next year we will have a great practical experience to share.”

How Kyiv Fights the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

Author: Yana Kazmirenko, Ukraine

The adoption of the Fast-Track Cities strategy resulted in launching of the HIV express-testing in all outpatient clinics in Ukraine’s capital. The strategy also allowed to increase the number of people who receive antiretroviral therapy.

The struggle against HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kyiv strengthened since the mayor Vitaliy Klitschko, signed the declaration in Paris. Apart from that, Kyiv was included into the Fast-Track Cities programme in April 2016 as a measure to fight AIDS. According to this programme, 90% of the citizens in 2020 should know about the disease, 90% of the infected ones should be getting treatment, and the treatment should be effective for 90% of the patients.

In the latest United Nations agency report on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and UN-Habitat as of 2015, the Ukraine’s capital entered the list of 27 most HIV/AIDS infected cities in the world. Alexander Yurchenko, the head physician at Kyiv AIDS centre, hopes that Kyiv will not be included into the newest rating. The programme has seen first success. 800 medical workers were trained, and every outpatient clinic in Kyiv received express-tests. The result of the test is available in as little as 20 minutes. There were 2,500 more individuals (compared with the previous year) who had tested their blood in a year.

A record amount of 555 people was included into the dispensary registration with the help of express-testing only over the first quarter of 2017. To compare: only 1300 people were registered in 2016, according to Yurchenko.

In his opinion, the situation in Ukraine’s capital with a population of three million people has improved. There were only around 5,000 people getting treatment in 2012, and now there are more than 7,000. It is planned to give treatment to 12,000 people by the end of the year.

Migrants and HIV

Yurchenko attributes Kyiv’s high position in the world ratings of HIV spread due to its attractiveness for migrants. 400,000 people come to work in the capital daily.

“Men who have sex with men (MSM) also tend to come to Kyiv, as it is hard for them to even live in such regional centre as Cherkassy. They attract a lot of attention in smaller cities. In the capital, they can find work, hide themselves, and find partners,” continues the interviewee.

The prevailing factor of HIV spread in Kyiv in 2012 was an injecting way of transmission. Now the predominant way has shifted to sexual transmission.

For instance, the story of the oldest patient in the capital of Ukraine. The man admitted that his wife was refusing sexual intercourse with him and he had to use the services of sex workers.

“Doctor, now I know what I will die from,” the old patient said jokingly, after he heard his diagnosis.

“According to statistics, you will die from cardiac ischemia, but we will control and monitor your HIV,” Yurchenko remembers his dialogue with the patient.

Surviving thanks to the Foundations

Kyiv’s mayor Vitaliy Klitschko stressed that one of the main responsibilities that Kyiv took within the framework of the Fast-Track Cities programme is the provision of sufficient amount of antiretroviral medicines for treatment of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

There would be significant progress in the implementation of the Fast-Track strategy if the government did not delay the supplies of medicines for antiretroviral therapy. This leads to patients receiving one month course of treatment instead of six or three months’ courses.

The variety of options in treatment schemes (around 38 of them) does not yet allow to pass the dispensing of medicines to the family doctors’ level. Yurchenko promised that there will be two or three variants of treatment made, and they will be passed on to the outpatient clinics as soon as the government supplies of medicines are in full scope.

Now patients literally survive at the expense of international and private foundations. On July 11, Kyiv has become the first Eastern European city where HIV-positive patients received dolutegravir (sixth generation medicine for antiretroviral therapy) at the expense of the Elena Pinchuk ANTI AIDS Foundation. The yearly course of medications will cost $170. This allows to increase the number of people who will receive the life-saving treatment in as early as 2018 at no additional cost.

The adoption of the law on mandatory HIV testing* can also bring the capital closer to the standards implemented by Fast-Track Cities. Alexander Yurchenko says that this law might be enacted by the end of the year.

As estimated by the experts, the number of HIV/AIDS infected people in the capital is 23,000 inhabitants. This is the tenth of the estimated figures in Ukraine – 250,000. There were 304,914 officially registered new cases of HIV infection in Ukraine since 1987. Since that time, there were 42,987 deaths from AIDS. The regions most affected with HIV infection, apart from Kyiv, are Dnipropetrovsk, Kyiv, Donetsk, Mykolayiv and Odesa regions.

*AFEW International is not aware of the law on mandatory HIV testing and will advocate against such law.

Central Asian NGOs Built a Network for Cross-Border Control of Tuberculosis

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

During the regional seminar-meeting held on 6-7 June in Almaty, Central Asian nongovernmental organizations established a network of partner organizations to address issues of labour migration and tuberculosis. The participants accepted draft Memorandum of cooperation between non-profit organizations to reduce the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis among migrant workers in the countries of the region.

“This document was created in response to the need of NGOs consolidation to educate migrant workers about TB symptoms and the opportunities of free treatment and diagnostics in the framework of the project, to promote treatment compliance, to exchange information and to disseminate best practices in the countries of Central Asian region,” says a project manager of the Global Fund, a representative of Project HOPE in the Republic of Kazakhstan Bakhtiyar Babamuratov.

The event was organized by the Project HOPE in the framework of the grant from Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Representatives of non-governmental organizations from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan attended the seminar .

Migrants do not want to be treated

From all the countries in the Central Asian region, Kazakhstan is accommodating the main stream of migrant workers from neighbouring countries. Migration flow continues to grow. Those who come to find a job often agree to any work, they often live in poor housing conditions and do not eat well. This results in tuberculosis development. In 2016, 753 external migrants addressed the organizations of primary health care and TB facilities of Kazakhstan and were tested for tuberculosis. In 2015, there were only 157 visits. Most migrant workers prefer not to attend medical institutions and refuse to be treated in the TB clinics or to be examined by a doctor. They consider it to be a wasting of working time, i.e. money. They have to support families left at home, therefore money is the main reason to come to a foreign country. For the same reason people do not want to spend money on health, even though a Comprehensive plan to combat tuberculosis in Kazakhstan for 2014-2020 involves activities to improve TB services for migrant workers.

Particularly alarming are the cases when a migrant worker is diagnosed with HIV/TB co-infection, and when such patient needs a serious treatment and social support. This important topic will be discussed in 2018 in the framework of the 22nd international AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – in Amsterdam. This conference will be very special as for AFEW International and the whole region where the organization works — Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Work at construction sites and markets

In the situation mentioned above, the participation of the NGOs in addressing of this issue has become very important. Outreach workers and volunteers – people, whom the target group trusts, – are searching for migrant workers on construction sites, at the farms, markets, in the restaurants or cafes. They tell migrants about the disease and the free treatment, convince to pass the examination and to provide social support. The results of such work are impressive.

“Within the project, implemented by Project HOPE in 2016, staff and volunteers of our public Fund helped 898 migrant workers to be tested for tuberculosis. For 25 of them the diagnosis was confirmed, and with our assistance people were able to receive free treatment. Besides, we provided migrant workers with motivational food packages. 8,312 labour migrants received information about the symptoms of tuberculosis, and now they know where to go if they are sick,” says the Director of the Public Fund Taldykorgan regional Foundation of employment promotion Svetlana Saduakasova.

These are the results of the activity of only one non-governmental organization in Kazakhstan. Nowadays, social activists are effectively working in eight regions of the country. Such results are possible to achieve only thanks to active collaboration with the non-governmental organizations from those countries where work migrants come from. The community members actively communicate with each other and exchange useful information to be aware of whether the diagnosed person came back to his home city, got registered in the TB clinic, continued to receive treatment, and so on. Only under these conditions we can achieve a complete recovery from TB for each individual and finally stop the growth of morbidity in the region.

Tatiana Vinogradova: «Only public organizations are able to work with vulnerable groups»

Tatiana Vinogradova

Author: Anastasiya Petrova, Russia

Last year a major event in the field of HIV in Russia became the adoption of the National strategies of counteraction with the spread of HIV-infection in the Russian Federation until 2020. One of the key objectives of the Strategy was the consolidation of efforts of governmental and nonprofit organizations in their fight against the epidemic. Today we discuss the implementation of this interaction in the most progressive city of Russia with the Deputy chief physician of St. Petersburg Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases, holder of Doctoral degree in Medicine, third-generation doctor Tatiana Vinogradova.

– Tatiana, do you support the idea of implementation of cross sectoral programs on HIV prevention among vulnerable groups in cooperation with socially oriented non-profit organizations?

– In addition to the scientific-organizational work in the AIDS Center, I am responsible for the interaction with public organizations in the context of HIV-infection in Saint-Petersburg. I think, this is very important. HIV is a socially sensitive disease, and groups of HIV vulnerable people – people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, sex workers – usually are not easy to approach. I am deeply convinced that only nonprofit organizations, organizations that deal with this issue and have experience in the field, are able to work with the key groups. Even if we have an opportunity to send “a man in a white coat” to interact with these key groups, there is no guarantee that this health worker will be accepted and will be able to perform all the necessary tasks. Nonprofit organizations have access to these closed groups, they are able to work on the principle “peer to peer.” Representatives of vulnerable groups perceive them appropriately and they are able to provide medical assistance as well. This is the most important! We can find a lot of new HIV-cases by testing a large number of people, but when we test the general population or key populations, our work is not limited with testing and identifying, we also should provide medical support. Peer consultants and employees of nonprofit organizations are the best in this field.

– How does the Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases cooperate with NGOs? Is there any model or mechanisms?

– AIDS Center in St. Petersburg works with community organizations from the very first day of its existence. In the beginning, there was no AIDS Center in its modern sense, but there was an office based in Botkin hospital, which started this interaction. The first nonprofit organization was registered by Nikolay Panchenko. Therefore, we can say, that here in St.-Petersburg we already have thirty years of cooperation experience between public institutions and community organizations. We work together since the early 90’s.

Committee on health care through the Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases provides financial support for the HIV prevention offices, which work in the city. Nowadays there are four such offices based on public medical institutions. These offices work in close cooperation with community organizations that employ peer consultants. Together with nonprofit organizations we conduct events, various events like testing days, for instance. Nonprofit organizations also hold round tables, press conferences, which our doctors always attend.

Nonprofit organizations also participate in the Coordinating Council affiliated to the government of St. Petersburg. This Council consists of the leaders of the organizations representing each of the key groups: those who work with people who inject drugs, or who work with LGBT community, or with women, or who provide legal support. In our city, the Health Committee as well as the Committee on social policy work in cooperation with NGOs in the context of HIV infection. I do not think there is another similar model in other regions. NGOs in Saint-Petersburg receive grants and funding not only from health but also from social policy institutions. There are many offices across the city, where peer consultants officially and legally work with the vulnerable groups, provide them support and accompany them to the AIDS Center.

– It seems to me, that we have adopted a western model of interaction, is it true?

– Yes. Basically HIV-infection appeared in Russia later than in Western Europe and the United States. Why to reinvent the wheel, if there is already some experience that can be used? I remember in the late 90s – early 2000s, when the first wave of HIV-infection started, and it spreaded very quickly among people who inject drugs. In one year 10,000 cases were found. At that time, it was something terrible. People were dying. At that time, it was a fatal diagnosis. Then the first bus appeared on the basis of the AIDS Centre, and our head nurse Marina Petrova was sitting in that bus nearby the metro station Gostiny Dvor, taking blood. Back at the time there were no rapid tests, and no one could predict that they will once appear. We used test tubes. This work was done in cooperation with public organizations.

– Are there any effectiveness indicators of such an interaction and what are they?

– Our AIDS center is one of the largest AIDS centers in Russia. 35,000 patients are registered, and a lot of them come from mobile laboratories of local public organizations. There are several organizations in our city that are doing rapid testing and providing counselling about HIV infection. 80% of people, who get their diagnosis during the testing in these organizations, then go and get registered in the AIDS Center. This is very important, because it is not enough just to identify a new case. A person needs some health survey to decide if the therapy is necessary. We must provide some psychological support to help him or her deal with the stress, which is unavoidable when the person learns the diagnosis. We must motivate him or her to be followed up by a doctor. After all, if she or he will be followed up by a doctor, she or he will stay alive. This is the most important thing. If a person receives antiretroviral therapy, he or she does not transmit the virus further. A person lives, and a virus is not spreading.

– The 22nd AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – will be held in Amsterdam, and the organizers would like to see a wide representation of people from Eastern Europe and Central Asia there. Have you participated in previous conferences and do you plan to attend the next one?

– The first AIDS conference I attended was held in Geneva in 1998. Now I plan to attend the conference in Amsterdam. I already have two ideas for the conference abstracts. During the conference, I would like to get new information about the interaction with public organizations.

Module on Writing a Conference Abstract Announced

AFEW International and Health[e]Foundation present online course on community based participatory research – CBPR[e]education and free preview to the module Writing a conference abstract.

In the seven modules of the CBPR[e]Education course (available in English and Russian) you will gain insight into, and understanding about the key principles of community based participatory research.

Part of this course is available for free: module on writing a conference abstract. This module presents present information on the general requirements and considerations regarding abstract writing and the criteria used in the selection process.

Go here for more information and access to the course or send an email to info@healthefoundation.eu

Introduction

AFEW International: inviting Eastern Europe and Central Asia to AIDS 2018

AFEW International with the support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs is implementing a range of activities to empower CBOs, NGOs, activists, policy makers, stakeholders, researchers and clinicians from Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA*) region to take part in the XXII International AIDS Conference 2018 in Amsterdam.

AFEW International activities:

From April 2017 – online learning courses that consist of seven modules on community based participatory research including a module on abstract writing (price: 50.00 euro, excluding Certificate)

From July 2017 – online module on abstract writing in Russian and English (free of charge for everyone). See details on the last page of this leaflet

Ongoing – educational online materials (tutorials) on how to navigate towards AIDS 2018

Ongoing – guidance and mentorship on abstract writing

Only for those whose abstracts and presentations got accepted – support in getting scholarships to attend conference

Summer 2018 – skills workshop How to present your work or research findings (for up to 25 participants accepted for presentations at AIDS 2018)

…and special events before and during AIDS 2018 for the EECA region delegates.

Indicative schedule for the applications for AIDS2018:

1 Dec 2017 – Feb 2018 – Abstracts. Workshops. Global Village. Youth Programme. Scholarships.

1 Dec 2017 – March 2018 – Exhibition. Satellites.

April 2018 – June 2018 – Volunteers.

For most up-to-date information on the AIDS Conference 2018** please refer to its official site (in English only). AIDS2018 news and important updates in Russian will be available here.

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*EECA region in which we operate includes the following countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.

**Please note that official language of the AIDS Conference 2018 is English. All applications should be in English too. AFEW International is working on options for language support during the conference for EECA delegates who do not possess solid English skills. 

AFEW International Announces Culture Fund for the Students

AFEW International with the support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs is announcing a Culture Fund for providing support to all sorts of cultural materials and exhibitions to address stigma and discrimination related to HIV, diversity and other related issues in general, and particularly in the EECA region.

Through the means of arts and culture, the Culture Fund will attract attention of the Dutch people and international community of policy makers, donors, stakeholders, researchers and clinicians who will visit International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam next year, to the issues, challenges and achievement of the EECA region in response to AIDS epidemic.

There are several barriers for the delegates from EECA region to participation in the AIDS conferences: lack of skills on scientific writing and abstract development, costs of participation, language barrier, and quite low interest of the region to the Conference in general.

With our project, we address these barriers, and the Culture Fund will become a specific means to motivate arts and culture communities in the EECA region to attend the conference and thus attract attention of diverse groups of conference visitors including Dutch public to the EECA region and the current state of the AIDS epidemic and response to it.

Meanwhile, we are forming a Think Tank of talented and motivated people who will help us to develop Culture Fund concept; create detailed planning which will identify number of potential recipients of the funds for developing arts and culture pieces; determine criteria for selection of the ideas and initiatives submitted; develop management structure; describe activities and climax event(s); and plan for evaluation; and join coordination group to make it work.

We invite students who are based in the Netherlands to join our Task Force. By the 18th of April we expect to receive a A4 Letter with your vision of the Culture Fund. You can send your suggestions at info@AFEW.nl. More details on what to include in your letter you can find here.

Community-based Participatory Researches are Starting

IMG_114226 applications out of 44 were selected in the small grants programme to support community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia (EECA) region. The small grants fund is part of a wider programme to build the research capacity of community based organisations in EECA region and increase meaningful participation of the region at the AIDS2018.  The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs provides financial support to the programme.

The supported applicants are from 10 countries of the EECA region: Ukraine, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Belarus, Armenia, and Uzbekistan. They represent the following target groups: people who use drugs, people who live with HIV, sex workers, HIV positive women, MSM, transgender people, prisoners, and LGBT.

The total grant fund for the proposals is €230,000. “Previously we announced that the fund was €120,000, but we managed to get more funding and that is how we can afford implementing more projects,” project manager Aids2018EECA in AFEW International Daria Alexeeva is saying.

The grant winners will soon start to implement their researches in their countries. It is expected to have the results of the CBPR in the fall of 2017.