Half of the HIV-Infected Population in Kyrgyzstan does not Receive any Treatment

Infectionist of the city AIDS center Erkin Bakiev knows the importance of counselling the patients on antiretroviral therapy

Author: Olga Ochneva, Kyrgyzstan

Valentina from Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, found out about her HIV-positive status after her stay at the Russian hospital where she had several surgeries. HIV tests were negative before the surgeries. Valentina could not prove the doctor’s fault and returned home with some hope for the fallacy of diagnosis. When her diagnosis was confirmed, the woman received consulting and support from the doctors at the capital’s AIDS centre and started receiving the therapy.

“In the course of these six years, I have got acquainted with other patients, and then started working as a consultant myself,” Valentina is saying. “I can tell from my experience that most people who deny treatment are afraid of their status to be revealed and they lack information. For example, my husband is in jail now and he also has HIV. He does not receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) even though there is such a possibility in jail. Prisoners think that the therapy has severe side effects. I try to convince him, but he continues to refuse without even trying.”

People are afraid of discrimination and self-stigmatization after being diagnosed with HIV. For many years there was an information attack on HIV being a horrible deadly disease, the Deputy Director of the Republican AIDS Center Aibek Bekbolotov says. He hopes that in the nearest future it will be possible to draw people’s attention to the issue and tell them that HIV is a chronic controlled disease and when you are on treatment and have zero virus load, you cannot pass the virus on.

Today, 3,055 people in Kyrgyzstan receive ART. It makes 56% of all patients who are aware of their disease and 35% from the estimated amount of people living with HIV. According to the UNAIDS goals, the country has three years left to achieve the 90% treatment coverage of people diagnosed with HIV.

Not all doctors know about the mark

Khalida’s child was infected during the mass internal hospital infection case in the south of Kyrgyzstan in 2007-2008. At that time, the boy was admitted to intensive care unit because of an insect bite.

“After the scandal with the infection, doctors started mandatory HIV testing of children. My son was seven when he was diagnosed with HIV. We started receiving therapy, even though my husband and mother-in-law were against it. The boy is 12 now, and he is aware of his disease,” says Khalida. “Earlier we went to Osh regional AIDS centre. We currently receive treatment at the regional hospital where we live. In order to get additional treatment, we need to take a referral from the AIDS centre. I know other parents who deny that the diagnosis is written on the medical card. They occasionally meet doctors who do not know about the special mark on the referral and they can ask about the meaning of the mark in front of everbody.”

Decentralization of ART services to the primary level happened in almost all regions of Kyrgyzstan. It has become more convenient for patients to receive the service. Nevertheless, service in small regional hospitals sometimes jeopardizes the confidentiality of the therapy, as we can see with the mark or mentioning HIV openly on the medical card.

“We received several complaints on confidentiality disclosure. There are not many of them, but one or two such cases quickly spread in the community. They can cause distrust in service providers,” notes Aibek Bekbolotov. “On the primary level, the qualification of doctors in these issues is slightly lower, but we are constantly working on improvements in this area.”

The number of ART involved patients grows every year. Since 2012, the patient coverage has increased fivefold. In many respects, this was due to the introduction of WHO recommendations in the country. They expand the indications for the administration of ART therapy and seek to cover the treatment of all diagnosed patients.

30 out of 100 patients stop taking medicines

The indicators of adherence to treatment in the country improve every year. There is a wider range of medicines, which allows to lower the number of pills, the frequency of taking medications and to reduce side effects. Nowadays, about 60% of all patients, who take ART, achieve efficacy in treatment, that is, the suppressing of viral load to an undetectable level.

“Out of 100 patients who are annually connected to the therapy, 20-30 people stop taking medicine during the first six months. This is the most difficult period during which the possibility of side effects is higher,” says Aibek Bekbolotov. “If people continue the therapy for a year, the interruption rate will be no more than 10%. In vulnerable groups, such as drug users and sex workers, there are many everyday worries about finding a livelihood. It is harder for them to continue the treatment because of their life conditions.”

The evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment is carried out twice a year in accordance with the viral load indicators. Doctors interview their patients, look at the regularity of receiving medicines, remnants of medicines, and the general condition of patients.

“It is the regimen. I know that I need to take medicines. It also happens that I can miss a day or two, because I feel really bad after taking them,” says Valentina. “Doctors are not interested in how strictly I follow the regimen. Their job is basically to give out the medicine. I was tested for viral load in April, but I still have not received the results.”

At the beginning of this year there were difficulties with the purchase of test systems in Kyrgyzstan, the deputy director of the Republican AIDS Centre is saying. Therefore, the examination for viral load in the first quarter of the year was practically not carried out. Until 2016, there was only one laboratory in the country where the viral load was determined. Nowadays there are two such laboratories.

In Kyrgyzstan, they always work on the patient adherence to treatment. ART is purchased from the Global Fund. On the state budget, drugs are purchased for the treatment of opportunistic infections. Nearly 50 NGOs in the country work in the HIV sector.

Youth is Invited to Lead the Amsterdam Youth Force at AIDS 2018

Nadiia Dubchak

The Youth Force for AIDS 2018 is looking for young people and youth organisations. Nadiia Dubchak, from Kyiv, Ukraine, is the co-chair of the Youth Force of AIDS 2018 Conference, and she is representing Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). Meanwhile, Nadiia is looking for active people between the ages of 15 – 26 to help found and lead the Amsterdam Youth Force (AYF). AFEW International is supporting this initiative.

The engagement of young people in the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam next year is fundamental. Every International AIDS Conference, a group of young people and youth organisations come together to create the Youth Force. Young people are essential in creating a response to HIV and AIDS that will reach the end of the epidemic. Young people are also people living with HIV, sex workers, people who use drugs, LGBTQI and many other groups that are key in creating a future without HIV and AIDS.

“I strongly hope that, as youth activists and leaders, we will act together, on behalf of the world teen and youth community, and make a significant contribution to AIDS 2018. Indeed, I would be thankful for your support and honored to convey your ideas to the Conference Coordination Committee prior to and during the Conference. We are now building up the Youth Force working groups which would guarantee an excellent performance and efficiency of AYF in different dimensions of AIDS 2018. We kindly invite youth-focused activists and young leaders from all over the world to join us,” Nadiia Dubchak is saying.

How to join

To become a part of AYF, please like their Facebook page to stay in touch and share info about their activities online. To join a working group, please write an email to amsterdamyouthforce@gmail.com including your basic contact details and a short motivation note. Also, you can use this email to pose any questions regarding AYF and your personal involvement. For those interested in contributing to AYF, you can add Nadiia Dubchak on Facebook.

Scientific Tracks and Conference Objectives of AIDS 2018

The 22nd International AIDS Conference that will take place in Amsterdam, the Netherlands on 23-27 July, 2018, announces its scientific tracks and conference objectives.

Scientific Tracks

AIDS 2018 Conference will welcome submission of abstracts for original contribution to the field in the following scientific tracks:

Track A: Basic and Translational Research.

Track B: Clinical Research.

Track C: Epidemiology and Prevention Research.

Track D: Social and Political Research, Law, Policy and Human Rights.

Track E: Implementation Research, Economics, Systems and Synergies with other Health and Development Sectors.

AIDS 2018 Conference Objectives

  • Convene the world’s experts to advance knowledge about HIV, present new research findings, and promote and enhance global scientific and community collaborations in synergy with other health and development sectors.
  • Promote human rights based and evidence-informed HIV responses that are tailored to the needs of particularly vulnerable communities, including people living with HIV, displaced populations, men who have sex with men, people in closed settings, people who use drugs, sex workers, transgender people, women and girls and young people.
  • Activate and galvanize political commitment and accountability among governments, donors, private sector and civil society for an inclusive, sustainable and adequately financed, multi-sectoral, integrated response to HIV and associated coinfections and comorbidities.
  • Address gaps in and highlight the critical role of HIV prevention, in particular among young people in all their diversity and its integration in a range of health care settings.
  • Spotlight the state of the epidemic and the HIV response in Eastern Europe and Central Asia with a focus on investments, structural determinants and services.

The registration for the conference opens on December 1, 2017. More information about abstracts and submissions will be available in the coming months.

Kazakh Beauties Played Football for the Sake of Fighting with AIDS

Many students, young workers and musicians decided to check their HIV status

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

Football, rock, celebrities! Youth initiative called #ЖОКСПИД2030 (#NOAIDS2030) is taking place in Kazakhstan. The founders of this initiative are the Republican AIDS Centre, the Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV (PLH), and the Kazakh Union of people living with HIV.

“With this #ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative, we want to save the memory of those who died from the epidemic. We want to draw the attention of public and youth in particular to the deaths, stigma and discrimination of people living with HIV. We want to give an opportunity to think about the problem that may affect anyone. This is why people should take responsibility for their health and the health of their close ones,” says Nurali Amanzholov, the president of the Central Asian Association of people living with HIV and Kazakh Union of people living with HIV.

Beauties on… the football field

The initiative started in May 2017 on the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial with a mini-football blitz tournament in Almaty. The members of the team were not professional sportsmen and muscular men, but delicate and the most beautiful girls in the country – the finalists of the beauty contests, popular singers and journalists. However, girls’ mentors were real football professionals, including sportsman-composer Abdulkarim Karimov and renowned players Zharko Markovich and Bauyrzhan Turysbek from Kayrat team.

Most beautiful girls in the country – the finalists of the beauty contests, popular singers and journalists – played football during the event

Beauty does not only heal, but also attacks. Girls played desperately, boldly, with an excitement, no one wanted to give in the victory. Neither spoiled makeup, nor broken fingernails, or even injured knees could get the girls to stop playing even for a minute. Women’s football is beautiful and strong. This was exactly what men, who liked the tournament, thought about it.

“Girls played dramatically and proved that they can play this manly game not worse than guys. I especially noted the fearless goalkeepers,” said Abdulkarim Karimov, who could not keep his emotions and sympathies to himself.

In this stubborn struggle, the team of journalists won the first place; show-business representatives placed the second, “Miss Almaty” and “Miss Kazakhstan” teams placed the third.

Media is everywhere

“#ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative is yet another opportunity to demonstrate the readiness and the will to counteract the future spread of HIV infection. We can stop and even reverse the epidemic with a set of measures: prophylaxis, providing access to treatment for all who need it, fighting stigma, and, of course, the active involvement of public attention to the problem of HIV infection,” Bauyrzhan Bayserkin, the CEO of the Republican Center for AIDS Prevention and Control notes.

#ЖОКСПИД2030 initiative is another opportunity to demonstrate the readiness and the will to counteract the future spread of HIV infection

It will not be possible to attract public attention without media. Therefore, some participants of the initiative were journalists. Media employees were on the training in Astana where they were taught by media trainers and experts about professional media coverage on HIV topics: the usage of correct terminology, interviewing ethics of people living with HIV, and selecting actual informational materials. Participants received a lot of important information from volunteers and outreach-employees who provide legal and social support to people living with HIV and drug users.

Practically a quarter of all HIV infection cases are infected young people aged 20-29. What should the prophylaxis for this age group be like, so that it would not leave anybody indifferent and eventually stop the epidemic spread? This important topic will be discussed on the 22nd International AIDS 2018 Conference in Amsterdam.

Rock songs on dombra

Immortal songs of Victor Tsoi – 80s rock legend – sounded in new adaptation on the musician’s birthday (the idol of millions would have been 55). It was also the anniversary of the “Needle” movie made in Almaty. The performers were not professionals, but amateurs. However, this fact did not lower the emotional heat and expression. Victor Tsoi’s greatest hits were performed with the accompaniment of guitars, the orchestra and even in the genre of opera. Rock songs played on Kazakh national instrument dombra was the most spectacular performance.

Tsoi’s hits were performed Rock songs on Kazakh national instrument dombra

In this creative and positive atmosphere, the organizers of the republican initiative #ЖОКСПИД2030 introduced a commissar to the participants. Ali Okapov, the popular singer and musician has become the commissary.

“To be a commissary on such an important social campaign is a great honour for me. As well as to promote healthy lifestyle ideology among young people. Future starts today. These are not just words. The future belongs to young people, but we should build it now, and it is definitely the future without HIV!” Ali Okapov is saying.

“Almaty – the city without HIV” is another recent event within the framework of the initiative. It was organized by Almaty HIV Centre, Public Foundation «AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan», Kazakh Union of people living with HIV, social foundation “Doverie Plus” (“Trust Plus”.) People living with HIV told their stories in the atmosphere of openness and trust. Young people took part in the quiz on the knowledge of HIV infection. The doctors informed about the preventive measures. The event ended in massive HIV express-testing. Many students, young workers and musicians decided to check their HIV status. The live queue did not even pay attention to the intense southern sunlight.

Hepatitis A Prevails in Kyrgyzstan

Author: Olga Ochneva, Kyrgyzstan

Hepatitis Prevention Month to commemorate the World Hepatitis Day was organised for the first time in the history of Kyrgyzstan by the Ministry of Health in July this year. Over the recent years, the list of registered and allowed for import medications to treat hepatitis C has been expanded, the new clinical treatment protocol has been approved and a six-year target program to counteract viral hepatitis was adopted. Hepatitis is one of the leading causes of death among people living with HIV and higher-risk populations. Without a doubt, the discussion of availability of hepatitis diagnosis and treatment, introduction of treatment guidelines and implementation of the national viral hepatitis interventions will be an important part of the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam in 2018. We discussed the reasons for the increased attention to the problem of hepatitis in KyrgyzstanIn with Nurgul Ibraeva, Chief Officer of the Department of Health Services and Medications Policy of the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health.

Statistics and the real picture

“The problem of viral hepatitis in Kyrgyzstan is growing every year. Blood-borne hepatitis B and C remain a challenging concern, as patients consult the doctors whey they already have advanced illness and complications, such as liver cirrhosis and cancer. During the Hepatitis Prevention Month, we raised awareness in the population about the need to get tested and offered discounted tests that were supported by private laboratories. Many people in Kyrgyzstan find the price for hepatitis testing (around $50) challenging, so patients often discover their disease at an advanced stage,” Nurgul Ibraeva says. “Following the official statistics, in the last five years 11,000–22,000 people with viral hepatitis were registered on an annual basis. Health services provide treatment to more than 2,000 patients with parenteral hepatitis (hepatitis B, C and D – author’s note), but we believe that the actual number of those infected is much higher: more than 250,000 people.”

Prevalence of hepatitis A is the highest. It accounts for 96% of the registered cases, with blood-borne hepatitis B coming second. According to the National Immunization Schedule, since 2000, hepatitis B vaccine is administered to all newborns free-of-charge. As a result, hepatitis B incidence had a fourfold decrease over the last 16 years. Currently, our health services register around 300–400 new cases of hepatitis B among adults annually, while incidence among children dropped to several isolated cases.

“Immunization brings its fruit. According to the Ministry of Health regulation, health workers exposed to blood should be vaccinated, yet no funds are allocated for it, and not every health worker can afford a vaccine,” Nurgul Ibraeva is saying. “Unfortunately, there is no vaccine against hepatitis C. Even if you use means of protection and take the necessary precautions, there is always a risk. Some health care staff remain untested, and it is our estimate that around 1000 health workers have hepatitis C.”

According to the Republican AIDS Center and the Research and Production Association “Preventive medicine” of the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health, in 2014–2015, the share of health personnel with hepatitis C in the general HCV prevalence amounted to 2.5%. The same percentage is attributed to the general public.

Hepatitis C prevalence is the highest among people who inject drugs (PWID). In 2010, 50% of all hepatitis C cases was registered among PWID. By 2015, this share dropped to 35%. Inmates are also among those especially vulnerable to hepatitis C. Over the last six years, 24–53% of all cases were identified in correctional institutions.

“Needle exchange services and opioid substitution therapy are available in Kyrgyzstan, including prisons,” Nurgul Ibraeva is telling. “Prevention programs strive to break the chain of transmission, but the share of infections remains high, even though we managed to stabilize the situation.”

As is the case with other population groups, key populations are still inadequately covered by diagnostic services. According to the official data, from 100 to 200 new cases of hepatitis C are annually registered in Kyrgyzstan. However, the estimated number of people with hepatitis C is much higher: 101,960 cases among the general population and more than 11,000 cases among people who use injecting drugs.

Availability of treatment

In April 2014, the coalition of non-governmental organizations under the initiative of the “Partner Network” Association of Harm Reduction Programs successfully lobbied changes in the Kyrgyz patent legislation. This allowed Kyrgyzstan to import and license generic medications to treat hepatitis C. Currently, a 12-week treatment course on the basis of an officially registered drug costs $615 for a generic and $1500 for the original.

“We have access to several licensed medications produced in China, Egypt and India,” Nurgul Ibraeva says. “If earlier treatment for one patient amounted to $15 000–20 000, today patients can choose medications they can afford. With the expansion of the list of available drugs, producers have been lowering their prices. Yet, patients still have to pay for treatment, which is a challenge for key populations.”

All imported medications have been included in the Essential Medicines List, which is a pre-requisite for the potential state procurement in the future. A Target Program to Address Viral Hepatitis for the period till 2022 has been approved, yet it does not guarantee treatment and does not have financial backing for the planned activities. At the same time, only among people living with HIV, the prevalence of parenteral viral hepatitis exceeds 14%. Over the past six years, the registered number of people with HIV and hepatitis C co-infection increased twofold and reached 701 cases in 2015. Advocates succeeded to include annual hepatitis C treatment for 100 people with HIV into the State Program for HIV Control. Treatment will be financed by the government for the period of five years. Besides, this year a Clinical Protocol for Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Viral Hepatitis B, C and D has been approved. The document is aligned with the latest WHO recommendations and treatment regimens based on direct acting antiviral drugs that are widely available on the market.

Russia is Dancing for Life

Author: Anastasia Petrova, Russia

“Congratulations to “FOCUS-MEDIA” and dance4life for the victory in presidential grants competition!” This was the message Ekaterina Artemenko, the coordinator of projects in Moscow “FOCUS Media” foundation, got from her colleague around midnight on July 31. The happy news spread quickly and all danc4life project members knew about it the next day. The initiative was supported this year by the Presidential Grant Foundation.

Starting from 2006, non-commercial organizations in Russia are supported by the president. This was the first year of the presidential grant competition. For 10-year existence, the system of finance distribution was quite complicated: at first the head of the state approved the list of non-commercial organizations (NCO) – the receivers of grants with his decree, and then the NCOs were included into the finance distribution system. In 2017, the procedure was simplified: grant participants may apply online. There has appeared the unified operator – presidential grant foundation.

Coordination committee summed up the results of the first competition on 31 July, 2017. There were 970 NCOs-winners from 79 regions in the winner list, which is around 15% of all applications. There were 6,623 projects that participated in the competition. Three Russian NCOs, included in the register as “foreign agents,” are among presidential grants recipients. Operator has distributed grants with the total sum of 2.25 billion Russian Rubles within the first competition. The most financed project among the 12 grant departments was “Citizen Health Protection, Promotion of Healthy Lifestyle.”

Recognition of merit

Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS -MEDIA” celebrated its 20th anniversary last year. “We are happy to have received this grant, but frankly, we are also a bit surprised,” the employees of the foundation are saying.

There is a lot of work ahead even after receiving the grant. Financing will allow to run the project dance4life in 14 Russian cities. It will also include a module on tobacco addiction prophylaxis and anti-tobacco campaigns. Besides, the project will include additional component in the form of helping teenagers and young people with HIV. They will be able to volunteer in the project and take part in all of the activities.

Dancing is a universal language

Dance4life project, which won the grant, is a unique international initiative. The initiative aims at promotion of healthy lifestyle among young people, preservation and promotion of reproductive health, HIV infection prevention and many more socially important diseases. More than two million people from 20 different countries have been a part of the programme over the years of its existence.

The project started in 2005 in Russia. It began after “FOCUS Media” Foundation director Evgenia Alekseeva met the Dutch creator of the project Ilco van der Linde. After this meeting, she decided to take this international initiative to Russia. “FOCUS Media” Foundation existed for seven years by that time, dealt with health protection and, in particular, with AIDS prophylaxis among youth. That is why the aim of the project (which includes the prophylaxis of socially important diseases, addiction formation and strengthening young people) coincided with the foundation’s activity.

Now dance4life is a project with 12-year-old history in Russia, and it runs in more than 14 regions. During the years of its activity, it managed to involve around 220,000 young people, who say that dance4life has changed their lives. The keys to the uniqueness of the project are youth culture, energy and creativity that help spread the information on preserving health and taking responsibility for one’s life. Dancing as a part of the project is a universal language, connecting dance4life participants from all over the world.

The results will be presented on AIDS 2018

There were some guests in the ““FOCUS -MEDIA” Foundation office a week before receiving the news about winning the grant. Yulia Koval-Molodtsova, a former project coordinator in Russia and now an associate in the main dance4life office in the Netherlands, came to Russia to talk about the new working models.

After running the same programme since 2005, the international dance4life team has been working on the analysis and improvement of the project methodology. While the old working model made an accent on youth education, the new programme aims at self-realization of society. Now the programme invites young people on a journey: from relationship with oneself, to the relationships with partners and society in general. The components of HIV and sexually-transmitted infections (STI) prophylaxis, issues of contraception and gender equality are now skillfully connected with such important for young people topics: self-knowledge, establishment of personal boundaries, and control of social stereotypes. The principles of work have not changed: to inspire, teach, involve and celebrate. Due to the “peer to peer” approach, young people become the driving force of the project.

New model of work will be approved during this year. The pilot project is running in two regions. In Nizhny Novgorod, where the project is successfully running from the start, they work in cooperation with local schools. The new contacts will be established from scratch in Kolomna, a city in Moscow region, where dance4life is just starting. The model of the project is universal and can be used for both learning and leisure purposes of young people.

Even though the project will be financed by the Presidential Foundation till the end of 2018, the managers of the project would like to sum up the first results of work by next summer. The results of work and experience in the area of HIV/AIDS among youth will be introduced on the International AIDS Conference in 2018. The focus of this conference will be on Eastern European and Central Asian countries.

AFEW Announces Online E-Learning Program

cbpr-engAFEW International is starting the program that is supporting and strengthening the research capacity of organizations acting on behalf of and representing the interests of communities in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA.) The purpose of the program is to increase region’s participation in AIDS2018 conference in Amsterdam. The financial support is provided by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.

The program consists of the number of activities, including training for community-based participatory research, small grants program, workshop on dissemination and abstract writing and workshop on presenting research findings on AIDS2018 Conference.

AFEW International gives program participants the opportunity to take part in online e-learning modules for further development of their research skills. The modules are also available for others who are interested in community-based participatory research. Course that costs 75 euros, includes 7 modules on the preparation and conduct of community-based participatory research.

In addition, everyone will be able to participate in the webinar on data analysis, which will be held in late spring or summer of 2017. These days, AFEW International is also working on preparation of workshop on dissemination and abstract writing for AIDS2018, which will be held in autumn of 2017. It is supposed to be available to a wider circle of people.

Community-based research: the key population small grants fund AIDS2018

FB AIDS 2018 coverAs the HIV epidemic continues to grow in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, new, more relevant, interventions are needed to address this public health concern. Before such interventions can be implemented, the needs of certain communities at higher risk for HIV, TB and Viral Hepatitis need to be understood. Involving members of key population communities in research gives an opportunity to identify needs that are currently not being met. Community based research captures the actual situation on the ground more clearly and such research can be used as a powerful advocacy tool. By equipping community based organisations and community members with the tools to conduct research and collect data, research capacity will increase, and research results will reflect an inside perspective on needs and priorities.

Fund for community based research

Towards the end of 2016, AIDS Foundation East-West (AFEW) will release a call for proposals for community-based organizations to conduct research to benefit key populations living in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). The proposals will be assessed by a steering committee. Activities proposed by grantees must contribute knowledge to improving the health of key population groups in EECA. The grantee must be a legally recognized community-based organization registered and operating in EECA. All awarded projects should be completed within 9 months.

Training and Guidance

Training and guidance on how to conduct the community-based research, write abstracts, and present and disseminate findings, will be provided to the grantees. We will be looking for participants with a keen interest, some experience, and familiarity with community based research. A first training, Tools for Change: conducting community based research, is being planned for October/November 2016, followed by a call for proposals, selection, and grant awards.

Monitoring

The awarded research projects will receive guidance and support from the AIDS2018 project team, with some logistical support provided by the AFEW secretariat.  The research report and other relevant materials will be shared via the websites of relevant parties (AFEW, GNP+, EHRN, and others), in other briefings, newsletters, and at meetings and workshops. We anticipate that you submit an abstract to AIDS2018, with the aim of presenting a poster, or an oral presentation.

If you would like to know more about, or be considered for, this unique opportunity to gather knowledge and raise the voice of key populations in research, and at AIDS2018, send us an email at research@AFEW.nl. We will send you the application form on request. Please feel free to get in touch with us with questions or remarks. AFEW is looking forward to implementing this project, with and for you!

Join AFEW in the European Networking Zone in Durban

thumb_homepage_mobile_appOnly several days are left until the start of the AIDS 2016 Conference that this year is held in Durban, South Africa from 18 to 22 July. AFEW will be present at the conference with its own booth where everyone can leave a wish to be taken to the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands in 2018.

AFEW booth is situated in the European Networking Zone (ENZ) that is hosted by The European AIDS Treatment Group (EATG), AIDS Action Europe and ECUO. ENZ is part of the Global Village, a space where activists and researchers from the community in Europe will present their work and projects.

Several AFEW activities will be taking part in the European Networking Zone. On July 19 Anke van Dam, AFEW’s Director, will host a question and answer session about the road to AIDS 2018 starting at 15:00 at AFEW booth. Dutch Ambassador for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights & HIV/AIDS Mr. Lambert Grijns and UN Secretary-General Special Envoy on HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Mr. Michel Kazatchkine will be taking part in it. On Thursday, 21 July Anke van Dam will tell about the migrants in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia during “Migrants and Access to Health” panel that will start at 16:00. Click here to view and download the program of the ENZ: IAC2016_ENZ_Programme_small

You can follow the updates from AIDS 2016 Conference on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

AFEW Takes Part in 21st International AIDS Conference ‘ACCESS EQUITY RIGHTS NOW’

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AIDS Foundation East-West (AFEW) is taking part in 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016), on 18-22 July 2016 in Durban, South Africa. Visitors of AFEW booth in EUROzone of the Global Village will have the opportunity to leave a wish to be taken to the 22nd International AIDS Conference that will take place in 2018 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

“I am very glad to welcome our colleagues and friends to AFEW booth, – said Anke van Dam, executive director of AFEW. – We would like to share the results of our work in Eastern Europe and Central Asia and also invite them to come to the next conference in Amsterdam. AFEW is asked to engage EECA in the AIDS 2018 conference, and for us it is very important that many people from the region will be present to show their key activities there.”

On July 19 Anke van Dam will host a question and answer session about the road to AIDS 2018 starting at 15:00 at AFEW booth. Dutch Ambassador for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights & HIV/AIDS Mr. Lambert Grijns and UN Secretary-General Special Envoy on HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Mr. Michel Kazatchkine will be taking part in it.

On Wednesday, 20 July the executive director of AFEW will talk about youth friendly services in Ukraine at an expert panel that will discuss activities for young key populations at 11:30. On Thursday, 21 July Anke van Dam will tell about the migrants during “Migrants and Access to Health” panel that will start at 16:00 in the EUROzone in the Global Village.

AIDS 2016 conference in South Africa will focus on the latest issues in HIV science, policy and practice and will also seek to share key research findings, lessons learned, best practices, as well as identify gaps in knowledge. The conference will feature abstract-driven sessions, a daily plenary session, a variety of symposia sessions, professional development workshops, and independently organized satellite meetings. In addition, the programme will include a number of activities, such as the Global Village and the Youth Programme, which are an integral aspect of the International AIDS Conference.