Zero Discrimination Day 2019: Message from Anke van Dam

Stigma and discrimination are obstacles that discourage people from taking an HIV test in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Access to confidential HIV testing in the region remains a big concern. Many people only get tested after becoming ill and symptomatic. Today stigma is, unfortunately, the strongest barrier not only for testing among those who are not aware of their status but also for the treatment and care of those who live with HIV.

Stigma and discrimination are also a very big issue for people who use drugs and other key populations at risk for HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Discriminatory laws prohibit those groups to access health care and participate in the life of society.

Migrants are another vulnerable group who experiences stigma and discrimination on many levels. The situation worsens when migrants have HIV or use drugs. Then it is even harder for them to receive medical treatment.

It is especially important to talk about stigma and discrimination today while observing Zero Discrimination Day. We, at AFEW Network are supporting UNAIDS in highlighting the urgent need to take action against discriminatory laws. Working in Eastern Europe and Central Asia for almost 20 years, we are taking actions from our side as well. We are expanding the access to HIV testing by partnering with the non-governmental organisations and community-based organisations in the region and ensuring that people who use drugs, prisoners, sex workers, LGBTI, and young people have access to confidential HIV testing, and people living with HIV have access to good medical care and have great possibilities for a healthy future.

Ending discrimination and changing laws is our common responsibility, it is what we all can do. Everyone can contribute to ending discrimination and can try to make a difference. We all can break the wall of stigma and make this world better! Chase the virus, not people!

Olena Voskresenska: “2018 Was Very Active and Diverse for AFEW-Ukraine”

Author: Olya Kulyk, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine)

The executive director of International Charitable Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine) Olena Voskresenska is telling about the main achievements of organisation in 2018 and its plans for 2019.

– Olena, how was the year of 2018 for AFEW-Ukraine?

– 2018 was a very active and diverse year for AFEW-Ukraine. During the last year we strengthened and expanded our work on empowering key communities, developing community leaders and facilitating the dialogue between the communities. In our work with adolescents who use drugs within the project “Bridging the gaps: health and rights for key populations”, the special focus was on developing youth leaders. In 2018, young activists from four regions of Ukraine had a chance to develop their own projects, and small grants that we provided to them allowed young people to implement youth-led projects in their regions. Through the Country Key Populations Platform, that we continue to support, we had an opportunity to learn more about the needs of different key populations – people who use drugs, sex workers, LGBT, and ex-prisoners. We also help the communities to develop communication algorithms to ensure that the voices from the most remote areas of the country are heard by the community leaders.

Besides, at the end of the year, we started the project aimed at empowering HIV-positive women in Kyiv and Cherkassy as advocates for their rights. The project was supported by the Embassy of Norway – a new donor for our organization.

– What were the three main achievements over the past year that you can determine?

– Since 2011, AFEW-Ukraine has been working with adolescents who use drugs, and I am very proud that in 2018 we managed to expand this work to small cities and rural areas of Ukraine. It was possible thanks to the project “Underage, overlooked: Improving access to Integrated HIV Services for Adolescents Most at Risk in Ukraine” that is supported by Expertise France – Initiative 5%. The project is implemented in cooperation with Alliance of Public Health, and now services for adolescents who use drugs are developed in 28 small cities of seven regions of Ukraine. Initial project research, that is now being finalized, is the first of its kind not only in Ukraine but probably in most of the countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA).

In 2018, AFEW-Ukraine supported the development of standards on rehabilitation for the Ministry of Social Policy. I am very proud that we managed to bring together a good team of experts for working on the standards, including a representative of the community of people who use drugs. We hope that these standards will help to improve the quality of rehabilitation services in the country, based on the best international practices, human rights approach and needs of the community. We are very much looking forward to further work in this direction not only in Ukraine but also in Georgia.

2018 was also a very important year for all HIV service organisations, as it was the year of the 22nd International AIDS Conference that took place in the Netherlands. Being a part of AFEW Network, with AFEW International Secretariat in Amsterdam, we worked hard to ensure maximum involvement of EECA participants in the conference and attracting attention to our region. I am very happy that we managed to support a large delegation of AFEW-Ukraine partners, including young activist from Kropyvnytskyi, representatives of the community of people who use drugs, and HIV-positive women from Ukraine.

– What are the plans of the Foundation for 2019?

– In 2019 we will continue working with young people in Ukraine, focusing on their active involvement in decision-making processes, including monitoring of the local budgets. I hope that we will be able to expand our work to include young detainees in our projects.

Developing harm reduction friendly rehabilitation remains a priority for us, and we will stimulate the changes in current rehabilitation practices in Ukraine and Georgia with our local partners. Also, we are very much looking forward to closer working with HIV-positive women in Ukraine, disseminating the successful model of immediate intervention that was already tested in Kyiv, to Cherkasy, and potentially other regions of the country. In 2019 we are also planning to revise our strategic plan, which will define the priorities of AFEW-Ukraine’s work for the upcoming several years.

Anke van Dam: “AFEW will Continue to be the Bridge Builder”

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International


Anke van Dam on AIDS 2018 Conference

AFEW International executive director Anke van Dam sums up the results of 2018 and gives introduction of AFEW activities for the upcoming year of 2019.

Anke, how was the year of 2018 for AFEW International?

– It has been an amazing year for us! In the first half year our team prepared very carefully and intensely for the 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 – the biggest event in AFEW’s lifetime. It is the biggest health conference in the world and this time it was a very important event for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). We got to successfully highlight AFEW and EECA region during the Conference. Next to this major event for us, we also had our project activities, like Bridging the Gaps project, Fast-Track TB/HIV Responses for Key Populations in EECA Cities project, Improved TB/HIV Prevention and Care – Building Models for the Future project, the project with Andrey Rylkov Foundation. We were involved in the City Health Conferences, and in the STI.HIV.Seks Dutch national congress. AFEW was also in New York to addressing the needs for diagnostics and treatment for tuberculosis in Eastern Europe and Central Asia at a side event during the United Nations General Assembly high-level meeting on tuberculosis in September and during the 49th Union World Conference on Lung Health in October in the Netherlands.

Taking into consideration that AIDS 2018 Conference was so important for the region where AFEW works, what were the outcomes of this event for EECA?


Anke van Dam on AIDS 2018 Conference

– Eastern Europe and Central Asia were really in the spotlight, with so many partner organisations and colleagues we shared our successes and challenges to stop new HIV cases in the region. You could hear Russian everywhere, in the Global Village, corridors, network meetings! Herewith some figures: compared with the International AIDS Conference 2016 that took place in South Africa, the EECA representation during AIDS 2018 Conference in Amsterdam increased from 3.9% to 10.5% at all activities included in the official programme. We had 16 speakers from the EECA region, which represented 5% of all speakers, and this is a big success. Thanks to the promotion of AIDS 2018 to the EECA region and thanks to AFEW’s community based participatory research project, the number of abstracts submitted from the region were triple to the number submitted for AIDS 2016. In total, there were 627 abstracts submitted. AFEW International organized mentors’ support to the partners, and that is why the quality of the abstracts improved substantially, which increased the chance of acceptance. Thus, 187 abstracts from the EECA region were accepted which marks a six-fold increase when compared to the previous conference. In total, 604 delegates from EECA visited the AIDS2018 – an almost five times increase in comparison to AIDS 2016 and AIDS 2014.

AFEW has invited some Conference participants with Martine de Schutter Scholarship Fund that was established not long before AIDS 2018. How many EECA participants got the scholarships to come to Amsterdam?

– It was very important for AFEW to ensure that many partners and colleagues were able to come to Amsterdam to get to learn about the state of the art in HIV prevention, treatment and care, and to get in touch with other (Western) activists, scientists and clinicians, AFEW used the AIDS 2018 as another opportunity to be the bridge between East and West. The amount of scholarships that International AIDS Society (IAS) awarded to the EECA region has increased dramatically both in comparison to the previous conference, and also to the AIDS 2010 in Vienna. In total IAS has granted 149 scholarships to delegates from the EECA region, and that was 13% of all IAS scholarships. Of this amount, 62 scholarships were funded by AFEW International. We have contributed 85,000 EUR to the IAS scholarship fund. On top of that, AFEW International has disbursed directly at least 57 more scholarships to Community-based participant research project (CBPR) participants, journalist, (young) researchers, activists, and governmental official delegates supported through AFEW offices. There was an increase in participation from the Central Asia in comparison to AIDS 2010, with total increase of 18 delegates from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. That was mainly thanks to increased scholarship support to these specific countries.


Anke van Dam on AIDS 2018 Conference

What are AFEW’s plans for the year of 2019?

– There are exciting developments for 2019. During AIDS 2018 Conference we have got the grant from Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF). Within this grant, with Aidsfonds in the lead, we have established the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in the EECA region. We are currently accepting the applications for emergency grants from 10 countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. With these small grants we are supporting organisations representing key populations in surviving in difficult situations which they face due to legal barriers, stigma and discrimination, financial challenges and political restrictions. Besides that, we are continuing the activities within Bridging the Gaps project, Fast-Track TB/HIV Responses for Key Populations in EECA Cities project, Improved TB/HIV Prevention and Care – Building Models for the Future project, and our activities in Russia. Recently, we have got the approval to start activities in the framework of the PITCH project, which will give us opportunities to continue working with the EECA cities, and to expand our activities in Russia further. Not long ago we have got 16,000 EUR of donation to Martine de Schutter Scholarship Fund from ViiV Healthcare UK Ltd. This financing will be used as an effective tool for the EECA scientists, clinicians, community professionals and activists for bringing challenges of EECA region on international agenda and learning from their peers through participation in the international conferences. AFEW will start with EECA INTERACT, a platform for (young) researchers in the EECA region to present their studies. AFEW will continue to be the bridge builder between communities and authorities, between communities and health care providers and between East and West for a better health in the EECA region.

Dreams of the “Invisible” Women in Kyrgyzstan

Author: Grana Ziia, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan

A photo exhibition “Dreams of the Invisible Women” was held in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan from November 25 to December 10, 2018. The exhibition, which was held in the centre of Bishkek and in the venues popular among young people, allowed women suffering from violence, discrimination, living with HIV or using drugs as well as LBT women to send a message to the society: “We are here! We also love and are loved, we deserve to be happy and have equal rights.”

The photo exhibition was initiated by Asteria Foundation with the UNAIDS support. The photo models were participants of Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations project. The exhibition was held within the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence Campaign, and its opening was dedicated to the World AIDS Day.

“Invisible women” face violence, they become hostage to an endless cycle of abuse, guilt and discrimination. People judge them and tell them: “That’s all your fault!” Often, drugs are the only way for them to run away from their pain, shame and despair. Due to the social stigma, women from the key populations almost never seek help, they are afraid that people will not understand them and will reject them. That is why their problems are invisible for the state and for the society,” says Irena Ermolayeva, Director of the Asteria Charitable Foundation.

Asteria’s statistics confirm this situation. According to the data available, all women from vulnerable populations who have families or intimate partners are exposed to different forms of violence. However, 80% of such women do not seek any help as they are afraid to face stigma and discrimination again.

“This campaign is very important for us. It opens new opportunities for women who use drugs, lesbians, trans women, women living with HIV and women who suffer from violence and show the issue from a different perspective. The main goal of the exhibition is not to “draw” a victim and not to label women, but to focus on the fact that first of all they are human beings and, thus, should have equal rights. I hope that this campaign will change the attitude of our society to thousands of women who are the same as the heroines of our exhibition,” says Irena Ermolayeva.

“Invisible women” are first and foremost someone’s mothers, who love and are loved, someone’s friends and relatives. They need the society to stop viewing them as a problem and to recognize their right to live free, happy and safe lives. They dream to be protected by law and by the state.

AFEW-Kyrgyzstan Started the Year with Rebranding

By changing the name “AIDS Foundation East-West in the Kyrgyz Republic” at the beginning of the year 2019, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan emphasized its involvement in the international AFEW Network. Another reason for changing the name and logo of the organisation is the expanding capabilities.

“Now we are working not only in the field of HIV and AIDS. We are implementing tuberculosis treatment projects, conducting large-scale researches, carrying out advocacy campaigns to protect the rights of people and for the economic empowerment of women. Therefore, the former name no longer fully reflects our goals and values,” says the Chair of the Board of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan Natalia Shumskaya.

The new logo has retained one of the key elements of the previous one – the human figure, because everything AFEW does is aimed at helping specific people. The figure also shows that AFEW-Kyrgyzstan works, involving people from the community, and for them.

Three blue and one red objects around the white pattern represent different countries since AFEW-Kyrgyzstan is a part of an international network and is ready to use the experience of foreign partners to build a healthy future in the country.

In an updated form, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan is ready to welcome its old partners again and look for new opportunities to help people from key populations.

AFEW-Kyrgyzstan Uses the Experience of Foreign Colleagues

216 adolescents were registered for using psychoactive substances in 2017, according to the Narcology Center in Bishkek. Representatives of the police services in Bishkek stated that there is also a high possibility that 1,031 teenagers, who were registered for committing different offences in 2018, had an experience of using psychoactive substances or are at a high risk of starting to do so. However, this data does not show the real situation. In Kyrgyzstan, there are still no complete official data on the exact number of adolescents who use psychoactive substances.

This is related to several factors. One of them is that the drug policy of the country is still strict and aimed to punish. Parents and children who face the problem of using psychoactive substances are afraid of getting help from medical specialists because the doctors will add teenager’s name to the special database. In the future, being in this database will not allow this teenager to be enrolled at the university or to get a high-paid job.

Another issue is that the country is lacking ways to support such adolescents. There is also a lack of a comprehensive program for the prevention of drug use among teenagers. The combination of all these factors does not allow the country’s specialists to work effectively with adolescents and to carry out preventive work.

Bridging the Gaps: health and rights of key populations (BtG) project, implemented by AFEW-Kyrgyzstan, intends to apply international experience to help adolescents who use psychoactive substances in Kyrgyzstan. BtG has regional exchange platforms, where specialists from EECA can share with each other their experience concerning harm reduction and rehabilitation issues. It helps the project to meet contemporary challenges. AFEW-Kyrgyzstan is aiming at creating a multifunctional mechanism that will help adolescents who use psychoactive substances and a professional system for preventive teenagers from using it.

The protocol is approved by the Ministry of Health

The clinical protocol ‘Mental and behavioural disorders due to the usage of new psychoactive substances among children and adolescents’ was developed with the support of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan and approved by the Ministry of Health in 2017. Professional narcologists and members of the community of people who use psychoactive drugs and other specialists developed the protocol.

“The developed clinical protocol gives the recommendations to emergency medical doctors, toxicologists, family doctors, resuscitators, psychiatrists and narcologists,” says Elmira Kaliyeva, a participant of the working group that developed the protocol.

Having developed the protocol, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan began trainings for narcologists, doctors of family medicine centres, teachers of the Kyrgyz State Medical Institute for post graduates and juvenile inspectors in Bishkek and Osh.

Working for the future

The representatives of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) got interested in the protocol too and the BtG work and approached AFEW-Kyrgyzstan with a proposal to teach doctors in remote areas of Bishkek to work with this protocol. The proposal of UNICEF gave the opportunity to expand the circle of specialists familiar with the protocol. In addition, this cooperation will allow AFEW-Kyrgyzstan to be confident that all the work done in the framework of the BtG project will continue in the country for many years.

Waiting for the city hall’s help

Establishing cooperation with government partners to ensure stable and long-term support for adolescents who use drugs was the next task of the project. In June 2018, within BtG project, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan supported a round table organized by the city administration for the presentation of the Comprehensive City Program Prevention of Juvenile Offenses for 2018-2020.

Deputies promised to consider the proposed Comprehensive City Program which also includes recommendations that were listed in the developed clinical protocol. The adoption of the program will allow to create a cross-sectorial system of cooperation in the country, where the various departments can work together and redirect children who use psychoactive substances to help them as efficiently as possible.

Opening a centre for teenagers

The round table also became a platform for discussing the urgent need of opening a specialized centre to support children and adolescents who use psychoactive substances.

“We are in favour of building a modern centre that is capable of providing quality support to adolescents and is able to give parents verified and necessary information. This centre will become a model for working with adolescents from a key group as well as an educational and methodological centre for social pedagogues, juvenile inspectors and psychologists,” says Natalya Shumskaya, head of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan.

Taking into consideration that Kyrgyzstan’s culture is very traditional, there is a common misconception that people who use psychoactive substances are not good members of the society. This stigma leads to several issues. For example, teenagers are scared to talk with someone about the use of psychoactive substances. They are afraid of being expelled from the school or being suspected in crimes only due to their experience of using psychoactive substances.

“The center is also going to work on increasing the level of acceptance of psychoactive substances use among the society. This will lead to more effective support from the side of adults and to less risky behavior of adolescents as they got all proper information they need. It is the first step that can lead to final abstinence,” says Chinara Imankulova, manager of BtG project in AFEW-Kyrgyzstan.

AFEW-Kyrgyzstan specialists already developed a project of such centre. The centre will also work with those who have never used psychoactive substances and with children who are in high risk of starting using them. The prevention work will include helping teenagers to organize their leisure activity and to give them information that usage of psychoactive substances is not shameful, however it is important to ask yourself whether you are aware of the risks and if you really want to do so, to find solid information and to ask for help of professionals.

Creating the centre and the approval of the Comprehensive City Program will help thousands of teenagers to make healthy choices for a happy life.

Michel Kazatchkine: “Failure to Interact with Vulnerabilities Could Lead to an Increase in the Epidemic”

The Chair of AFEW International’s Board Michel Kazatchkine and director of the organisation Anke van Dam during the 22nd International AIDS Conference. Photo: AFEW International

The inaugural World AIDS day was held on December 1st, 1988. The epidemic was raging across Western Europe and the United States. The world was only starting to realize the existence and the magnitude of the African epidemic. HIV was virtually absent from the Russian Federation. There was no treatment for HIV infection. AIDS was a death sentence, as we, physicians, were painfully witnessing every day in hospital wards.

30 years later, while no country has been spared of HIV, we cannot overestimate the progress that has been made. Extraordinary progress in science, research, and development, that has successfully translated into large-scale prevention and treatment programs in almost all settings, globally.

21 million people are now accessing antiretroviral treatment across the world. Life expectancy of an HIV-positive person on treatment is now similar to that of HIV-negative people. And we now know that an HIV-positive person whose virus has been suppressed with treatment will no more transmit the virus to a sexual partner, meaning that antiretroviral treatment also contributes to prevention of HIV transmission and to limiting the epidemic at the population level. In the last 10 years, the number of new HIV infections and AIDS-related mortality decreased by close to 40% globally. The hope generated by the progress has led the United Nations to commit to the goal of eliminating HIV by 2030.

Yet, an objective analysis of the situation today shows that the world is off track in achieving this target. The Russian Federation and, more broadly, the Eastern European and Central Asian region, are of particular concern.

Eastern Europe in the last five years is the only region of the world where both the annual number of new cases of HIV infection and of AIDS-related deaths continues to grow. The number of new infections reported in the region increased by 30% between 2010 and 2016. Over a million people are now estimated to be living with HIV in the Russian Federation; one in five do not know their status. It is timely then, that the theme of this year’s World AIDS day is “Know your status.”

Breaking down the raw numbers reveals an unsettling scenario. 45% of the people who know their positive status are on treatment and 75% of these are virally suppressed.

This means that, at the end, only approximately 27% of the total estimated number of people living with HIV are virally suppressing their infection and that a large pool of people with HIV can potentially transmit the HIV infection. All this in a context where national prevention efforts are lagging behind and fragile at best.

The ministry of Health aims at increasing treatment coverage to reach 75% at the end of next year and rightly points out how important it is to urgently address some of the myths and misinformation that prevent people from accepting treatment.

The HIV epidemic in Russian Federation is largely an epidemic of so-called “key populations” and their sexual partners – people using drugs, men who have sex with men, sex workers, migrants, prisoners – often marginalized groups of the population for whom stigma, discrimination, and criminalization drive many of these people underground, away from outreach workers and so with limited access to prevention  and treatment services.

An effective response to the epidemic within the Russian Federation should, therefore, entail a focus on specific geographic areas and populations. It also means seizing many immediate opportunities to build onto the HIV platform, the “SPID centers”, to provide additional services, including diagnosis and, as much as possible, integrated treatment of tuberculosis and hepatitis, as well as prevention services including “pre-exposure prophylaxis” for men having sex with me and provision of clean needles and injection materials for people who inject drugs.

When and where this kind of efforts have been employed around the world we know the outcome: a decline in new infections, a decline in the pool of infectiousness and improved control of the epidemic in general by the authorities.

We also know that failure to engage with most vulnerable and at-risk groups of people can bring – a growing epidemic that becomes increasingly more difficult to reign in.

A recent modeling study has shown, for example, that without integration and scaling up of needle exchange programs and antiretroviral therapy, HIV prevalence would remain as high as 60% among people who inject drugs in Ekaterinburg. Scaling up of the interventions would – in contrast – significantly reduce that prevalence and deaths associated with HIV. If the interventions were to cover 50% of people in need and to also include opioid maintenance therapy with methadone, currently unavailable in the Russian Federation, over 30% of HIV infections and HIV-related deaths could be prevented in Ekaterinburg.

The science and the experience from many countries, particularly in Western Europe, tell us that these approaches can best be implemented in a working partnership with civil society, recognizing the additional and complementary strengths brought by community-led services. In Saint Petersburg, joint efforts of the AIDS center and civil society to bringing testing closer to people in need of it and linking people to care, have led to significant decrease in the number of new infections and increase in treatment coverage. Civil society groups, in this case, are supported by both Presidential and municipal grants.

We should be encouraged by the integrated approach formulated both in the National strategy adopted by the Russian Federation two years ago and in recent guidelines on the prevention of HIV among key affected populations. A clear progress can be noticed in some regions of the country with regards to the partnership with civil society and service provision.

The challenge for the country is to translate what is on paper and high-profile statements into concrete policies that simultaneously sustain appropriately funded programs and engage in the structural and legislative reforms needed to remove obstacles that still impede access to prevention and care. Without such an approach, HIV infection in Russia will continue to grow faster than the efforts to fight it.

Michel Kazatchkine is the Special Advisor to the Joint United Nations Program on AIDS (UNAIDS) in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Source: kommersant.ru

World AIDS Day 2018 – Message of Anke van Dam

World AIDS Day 2018: a message of AFEW International Executive Director Anke van Dam

1 December 2018

This year’s theme for World AIDS Day is encouraging people to know their HIV status. HIV testing is very much needed for expanding treatment. Treatment is so important as that makes that no HIV is detected in blood and therefore not transmissible to other people. In the region where AFEW International works – Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) – barriers to HIV testing still remain. Last year, among the 1.4 million people living with HIV in the region 73% were aware of their HIV status.

Stigma and discrimination are the obstacles that discourage people from taking an HIV test in the EECA countries. Access to confidential HIV testing in the region is still a concern. Many people only get tested after becoming ill and symptomatic. That is why we at AFEW are working on expanding the access to HIV testing. Partnering with the NGOs and CBOs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, we ensure that people who use drugs, prisoners, sex workers, LGBT and young people have access to confidential HIV testing, and people living with HIV have access to good medical care and have great possibilities for a healthy future.

This year, the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam AIDS 2018 reinforced our work. The focus on public health concerns as HIV, TB and viral hepatitis in the EECA region allowed us to present the challenges and the obstacles in policies, political and health care systems. With the relevant stakeholders in one spot, we had an excellent chance to facilitate the dialogue between communities, political leaders and donors for better access to treatment and for sustainable financial mechanisms.

We are continuing emphasizing on Eastern Europe and Central Asia and its public health concerns after AIDS 2018 Conference! AFEW addressed the needs for diagnostics and treatment for tuberculosis in Eastern Europe and Central Asia at a side event during the United Nations General Assembly high-level meeting on tuberculosis in New York in September and during the 49th Union World Conference on Lung Health in October in the Netherlands. Let us continue the dialogue about the healthy future for the EECA region and let the barriers to accessing HIV testing be removed.

Online Compendium of Good Practices for the Long-Term Health of People Living with HIV Launched

Professor Jeffrey Lazarus (on the right) of ISGlobal, Hospital Clínic at the University of Barcelona. His scientific work includes leading the HIV Outcomes: Beyond Viral Suppression, the European Hep-CORE and the Hepatitis Continuum of Care consensus studies

HIV Outcomes today, on 27 November, launches an Online Compendium of Good Practices for securing the long-term health and well-being of people living with HIV.

Although people with HIV can now anticipate near-normal life expectancy, there are unique needs that must be met if their quality of life is to match that of the general population. As life expectancy for people with HIV has increased, additional unmet requirements for good long-term health and well-being have emerged.

The launch event in the European Parliament today highlights the key findings underpinning the Compendium and emphasises what makes these good practices important to people with HIV. The Compendium represents the latest output from work of the HIV Outcomes collaboration, building on the group’s road-testing of its 2017 recommendations on the long-term health, well-being and chronic care of PLHIV in Italy and Sweden this year. Looking at ways to apply the recommendations in real-world settings has provided vital insights into how to ensure they are taken up more widely. The Compendium is a resource that will inspire and support key stakeholders across Europe to meet the specific care needs of people living with HIV for the long-term.

“We cannot afford to be complacent; improvements in life expectancy for people with HIV need to be matched with improved life quality,” said Nikos Dedes, Chair of the European AIDS Treatment Group and Co-Chair of the HIV Outcomes Steering Group. “We know, from the preliminary work in Sweden and Italy, that these recommendations have the capacity to make a real difference. We need to do whatever is necessary to implement these recommendations and make sure that people with HIV in every country can benefit from this knowledge.”

During the event, co-hosted by Members of the Parliament (MEPs) Christofer Fjellner (EPP, Sweden), Karin Kadenbach (S&D, Austria) and Frédérique Ries (ALDE, Belgium), speakers will stress that the needs of people living with HIV go far beyond suppression of HIV. In a joint statement, the three MEPs from across the political spectrum said: “This is a timely reminder that there is more to life with HIV than viral suppression; proper quality of life is equally important. Now that we know what is needed, it is our duty as policymakers to press for changes to secure the long-term health of people living with HIV.” Given the upcoming European elections, the support of such a wide range of MEPs will be essential to keep the needs of people with HIV on the political radar.

During 2018, HIV Outcomes ensured that the recommendations launched last year have been fully tested and are implementable. Having identified the barriers to be overcome, in 2019 the initiative will focus on implementing the relevant recommendations in Italy and Sweden and will work to broaden the roll out of the recommendations across Europe.

For those diagnosed and treated early, HIV is now a long-term, rather than a fatal, condition. HIV Outcomes’ recommendations have been designed to address the needs generated by today’s increased life expectancy, looking to improve health outcomes and quality of life of people with HIV. The launch of the Compendium comes during European Testing Week and just ahead of World AIDS Day on 1 December.

The HIV Outcomes policy recommendations

  1. Adopt an integrated, outcomes-focused, and patient-centred approach to long-term care
  2. Expand national monitoring of long-term care and outcomes
  3. Fund studies to provide information on the long-term health of people living with HIV
  4. Combat stigma and discrimination within health systems.
  5. Upscale involvement of the HIV community in priority setting at country level

Source: www.hivoutcomes.eu / @hivoutcomes

The Advisory Board to the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations Starts to Function

The Advisory Board to the Emergency Support Fund for Key Populations in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) starts to function. The Fund will support Eastern European and Central Asian registered and non-registered NGOs and CBOs that represent key populations and that are surviving in difficult situations which they face due to legal barriers for key populations, stigma and discrimination, financial and social challenges and political restrictions. The activities of the Fund are implemented by AFEW International and AIDSFonds and financed by the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

The Advisory Board will ensure genuine connection to the situation in the EECA and give a guidance provision on the economic, political and epidemiological developments in the countries of the region. The Board advises the operational team of the Emergency Fund on strategic development of the Emergency Support Fund. The funding decisions will be made by the operational team.

The Advisory Board consists of eight members of the EECA region (see the table below) representing expertise in the programming and advocacy for all key populations: people living with HIV, people using drugs, young people, LGBTQ and MSM, and sex-workers.

The Advisory Board will meet once a year in person. Regular conference calls will take place every three months to revise the progress, exchange updates on the situations in the countries of EECA and adjust the Emergency Grant Fund conditions if necessary, as part of the learning process.

The first meeting of the Advisory Board will take place on 26 November 2018 in Amsterdam. During this meeting, the members of the Board will profoundly review the Emergency Fund documentation and call for proposals, eligibility criteria, evaluation process and criteria, and look at the set of relevant emergency situations. They will also share the latest updates from the EECA region and agree on one-year planning for the Board.

Name
Organisation
Position
Vladimir Mayanovsky
ECUO/Eastern Europe
and CentralAsian
 network of PLWHIV
Member of the management board
Ilya Lapin
CCM of the GF grant in Russian Federation) http://rusaids.net/ru/
PLWHIV representative with the voting power
Grigory Vergus
International Treatment
preparedness
Coalition in EECA, ITPCru
Regional Coordinator
Vitaly Djuma
Eurasian Coalition on Male Health (ECOM)
Executive Director
Igor Gordon
Eurasian Harm Reduction Association EHRA
Programs team lead
Svitlana Moroz
Eurasian Women’s Network on AIDS
Head of the Board
Nurali Amanzholov
Association of legal entities Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV
CEO
Yana Panfilova
Adolescent’s network
Teenergizer
CEO & Founder