AFEW Shared Techniques of Relaxation in Kyrgyzstan

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

The community dialogue platform gathered for the summer school last week in Kyrgyzstan. This summer school was organised within ‘Bridging the Gaps’ programme. The director of programs of AFEW International Janine Wildschut attended the school. After some days of serious work in which the community discussed struggles they face in Kyrgyzstan and how they can come up with a united voice, a training on burnout syndrome and how to prevent it was arranged.

“For many community leaders life is hectic and full of stress. First of all, they do their work with their full heart, which makes them also more sensitive for the stories and troubles of people they help. Secondly, the community members were mostly not trained as managers and leaders of NGOs, and now they are carrying this responsibility with big feeling of commitment. Besides, daily life in Kyrgyzstan for many people consists of a lot of struggle: family responsibilities, economic challenges and little time for relaxation,” Janine Wildschut shares. “This results in feelings of stress, little division of private life and work and little awareness of spending time on hobbies or personal time. Besides, within NGOs there is not much awareness of the need for staff to relax, take holiday time, have some breaks or breathing exercises. Women seem to have more pressure than men, as women are the main caretakers of the household.”

Thіs summer school gave the community members an opportunity to become more aware of stress factors. For one week they were thinking more about themselves, exchanged their worries and learned relaxation techniques.

“As I am not drinking or taking drugs at the moment, I do not know how to relax since that normally was my relaxation,” says one participant of the training who stopped to use drugs. Most of the participants of the summer school also feel that it is very important to be together during such studies since it is the only opportunity for them to gather together outside of official gatherings.

Janine Wildschut shared her experience with stress and burnout. Some of her lessons were taken as eye opener for many.

“When your system stresses up, it “tells” you to run harder, and that is the moment to stop yourself and slow down completely,” Janine said. “To have a boss that understands that this is important and supports you taking a break sometimes is also very important. As the problems around you are a fact of life, you are the only one that can change how you handle this: with stress or by contributing the best you can, but not more than you can.”

Besides, on her trip in Kyrgyzstan, AFEW’s director of programs conducted a focus group about community advocacy to see if change in this area is occurring, what is required to have a greater involvement of the community, and how the dialogue platform contributes to that. Janine also interviewed community NGOs on the situation of shrinking space for CSOs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The situation in Kyrgyzstan nowadays is stable. Wider coalitions are initiated and hard work is done with the government to show the invaluable work that NGOs are doing.

Tuberculosis and HIV are the “Imported” Diseases of Migrants

Author: Nargis Hamrabayeva, Tajikistan

A big amount of working age population in Tajikistan (where the entire population is eight million people) take part in labour migration to Russia. After their return to homeland, migrants get diagnosed with tuberculosis and HIV.

A 32-year-old labour migrant from Tajikistan named Shody has just returned from Russia. The doctors have diagnosed him with tuberculosis. The man states that he spent six years working in Russia. He went back home only a couple of times during that period.

The fear of deportation – reason for tuberculosis

“I worked at the construction site. Along with several other fellow countrymen we lived in damp and cold premises. A year ago, I started feeling weak, suffered from continuous coughing, but did not seek any medical advice. First of all, I did not have spare money, and secondly, I was afraid to lose my job. If I was diagnosed with tuberculosis, I would have been deported. Who would take care of my family then? Every day I felt weaker and weaker and I had to buy the ticket home,” told the migrant. Now Shody gets the necessary treatment according to the anti-tuberculosis programme, and his health is getting better.

A few years ago, the results of the research on tuberculosis spread prevention were revealed in Dushanbe. These results have shown that hundreds of Tajik migrants return from Russia with tuberculosis.

Experts say that around 20%, or every fifth patient, from the newly diagnosed patients turn out to be labour migrants.

“For instance, in 2015, 1007 people (which is 19.7% cases from the entire number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis) were labour migrants. In 2016 there were 927 or more than 17%,” Zoirdzhon Abduloyev, the deputy director of the Republican Centre of Population Protection from Tuberculosis in Tajikistan says.

According to him, the research has shown that most of the migrants became infected during their labour migration period.

“The main factors that lead to the spread of this disease among migrants are the poor living conditions. Big amounts of people in small areas, unsanitary conditions and poor nutrition, late visits to the doctors, and most importantly the fear of deportation from Russia,” says Abduloyev.

HIV is “brought” due to the migration

Many experts say the same thing about the spread of HIV in Tajikistan. That “it is being brought from there, due to the migration.”

Dilshod Sayburkhanov, deputy director of the Republican HIV/AIDS centre in Tajikistan, says that big number of Tajik migrants go to work in countries with significantly higher HIV prevalence rate compared to Tajikistan. Usually these are seasonal migrations, and after the end of the season migrants come home.

“Official statistical data shows the dynamical growth of the number of people who have been in labour migration among the new cases of HIV in Tajikistan. In 2015, there were 165 people diagnosed with HIV, whose tests were marked under the labour migrant category. Among them there were 151 men and 14 women, which is 14.3% from the whole number of new HIV cases. In 2016 – 155 (14.8%), in the first half of 2017 – 82 people (13.1%). In 2012, 65 migrants (7.7%) were diagnosed as HIV-positive,” says Sayburkhanov.

Statistics demonstrates the connection between international Tajik labour migration and the growth of new identified HIV cases, according to him.

Ulugbek Aminov, state UNAIDS manager in Tajikistan, also agrees with this. He thinks that migration and HIV are closely connected and result in a social phenomenon.

“There is an assumption that migrants, being in tough emotional and physical conditions, can behave insecurely in terms of HIV and thus have risks of the virus transmission in destination countries. Tajikistan HIV import issue is still in need of an in-depth study,” believes Ulugbek.

It is important to consider that migrants often represent vulnerable to HIV groups of population (for example people who inject drugs), and not knowing their pre-migration HIV status complicates the future process of HIV monitoring. Apart from that, the chances for migrant to receive the necessary specialized treatment go down. The treatment would prevent the spread of HIV to migrant wives and partners in their home country.

“Therefore, experts’ first priority task is the timely identification and quality monitoring of the disease in the countries where migrant live and transfer to, until the return of the migrant back home,” notes Ulugbek Aminov.

Experts believe that there should be a complex of prevention activities for HIV, sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among such vulnerable groups as migrants and their sexual partners.

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis on the Rise in Eastern Europe

Author: Ingrid Hein

An epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is mounting in Eastern Europe, and without intervention on multiple fronts there is little hope the spread will slow. For several years, we have been hearing that there is “a need for urgent action,” said Daria Podlekareva, MD, PhD, from Rigshospitalet at the University of Copenhagen. It needs to be addressed now, she told Medscape Medical News.

However, cultural and political issues mean that it is “not always easy to adopt international guidelines or initiate research projects,” she said at the International AIDS Society 2017 Conference in Paris.

“It’s difficult to go into Eastern Europe and initiate projects and do studies,” she explained. “Some Eastern Europe countries are still behind an iron wall.”

It can be easier to conduct research into infectious disease in other places — even African countries — than in most formerly Soviet Union countries. To help curb the epidemic in Eastern Europe, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Stop TB Partnership, and the European Union should collaborate to encourage governments to recognize TB as a public health emergency and to implement international programs and standards of care, said Dr Podlekareva.

Eastern Europe Is a “Perfect Storm” for TB

TB continues to be a major public health issue, according to the 2017 WHO report — Tuberculosis Surveillance and Monitoring Report in Europe 2017 — released in March. Most of the 323,000 new TB cases and the 32,000 deaths due to TB in the WHO European Region in 2015 occurred in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Eastern Europe is a “perfect storm” for the spread of TB because it has high rates of incarceration, HIV infection, and injection drug use, and it has disintegrated healthcare systems, suboptimal TB diagnosis and treatment, and poor adherence rates, Dr Podlekareva said.

In addition, nearly half of all TB cases are multidrug-resistant, which requires longer, more expensive treatment than drug-susceptible TB, and leads to more adverse effects. Treatment is also less accessible in the region.

And because rates of HIV infection are on the rise in Eastern Europe, where antiretroviral therapy coverage is low, the fast progression of immunosuppression leads to increases in the rate of TB and HIV coinfection.

More Likely to Die From TB in Eastern Europe

In an international cohort study on the management of concurrent HIV and TB, Dr Podlekareva and her colleagues found that TB-related deaths were significantly more common in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe or Latin America (Lancet HIV2016;3:e120-e131).

In that study, 1406 consecutive HIV-positive patients aged 16 years or older with a tuberculosis diagnosis were followed up for 12 months at one of 62 HIV and tuberculosis clinics in 19 countries.

The prognosis was far worse for the 834 patients treated in Eastern Europe than for the 317 treated in Western Europe or the 255 treated in Latin America.

Of the 264 (19%) deaths in the study cohort, 188 (71%) were related to tuberculosis.

Cause of Death Eastern Europe, % Western Europe, % Latin America, % P-Value
All 29 4 11 <.0001
TB 23 1 4 <.0001
 “Latin America and Eastern Europe have comparable economies, as middle-or poor-resource settings,” Dr Podlekareva said. But “Latin American patients did better — much better — than the Eastern European patients.”

In Eastern Europe, diagnosis is often made on the basis of clinical judgment, not laboratory confirmation, she pointed out. And treatment is often suboptimal, including very few active drugs. Moreover, disintegrated healthcare systems in Eastern Europe are detrimental to treatment, and care centers for TB and HIV are not combined. Plus, opiate-substitution therapy — an effective treatment for drug dependence — is limited or prohibited in most regions.

“Nearly 40% of our cohort had multidrug-resistant TB,” Dr Podlekareva reported.

Eastern Europe does not have to invent its own solutions; it can adopt “what we already know,” she told Medscape Medical News. Experience from the 1980s HIV epidemic in Western countries can be a guide. There are thousands of publications on the strategies and standards of care that work.

Prisons and Drugs Contribute

In Russia, illicit drug use is a criminal offense, and “methadone treatment is prohibited,” Dr Podlekareva said. “In Eastern European countries, like the Ukraine and Belarus, there are some drug-treatment programs, but they are not widely used as a standard of care.”

With no methadone support and very few social supports for injection drug users, access to treatment, adherence, and retention in care are a challenge.

Clinicians need to ramp up their efforts to convince patients to get treated. “There is a need for clinicians to be more willing to work together, to support these patients,” she said. “When we ask why a patient is not on antiretroviral therapy, they say the patient refused it, but I think it’s the clinician’s task to convince the patient.”

When injection drug users are thrown in jail, as they are in Russia, TB transmission proliferates, Dr Podlekareva explained. A previous study showed that intrapopulation transmission in prisons, population-to-prison transmission, intraprison transmission, and prison-to-population transmission have driven overall population-level differences in TB incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates in countries of the former Soviet Union (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.2008;105:13280-13285. 

She is not alone in her assessment. “The problem in Eastern Europe will not go away, especially multidrug-resistant TB, if the infrastructure is not improved,” said Christoph Lange, MD, from the tuberculosis unit of the German Center for Infection Research and Research Center Borstel in Germany.

“Patients have been getting treatment on and off,” so new strains of multidrug-resistant TB are emerging, he told Medscape Medical News. “People are now getting infected with drug-resistant strains,” and most Eastern European countries are not equipped to treat multidrug-resistant TB.

Dr Lange said that in the past year he has seen five Armenian patients with multidrug-resistant TB looking for treatment at his clinic. He referred to them as “health-seeking migrants,” and said, “we expect to see more.”

“The number of people with drug-resistant TB is increasing more than 20% every year,” he reported. The current targets of elimination are not credible and they don’t work under the current circumstances; health organizations and governments have to acknowledge that.

“Instead of having the goal of elimination, we need to work toward low incidence,” Dr Lange said. “We have to redefine our goals and address what is most endangering public health.”

Drs Podlekareva and Lange have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Source: International AIDS Society (IAS) 2017 Conference. Presented July 2017.

AFEW’s Intern Researches PrEP in Kazakhstan

Is Kazakhstan prepared for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)? Master student majoring in International Public Health at VU University in Amsterdam Marieke Bak was finding the answer to this question during her recent internship with AFEW International. For this reason, she spent five months in Almaty, Kazakhstan, doing her research.

“For the past five months, I have had the opportunity to do an internship at AFEW International,” says Marieke. “From the start, I felt very welcome in this inspiring organisation and it was great to experience what it is like to work for an NGO. As part of my internship, I went to Kazakhstan to explore the potential implementation of a new HIV prevention method among men who have sex with men. The interviews were incredibly interesting and I learned a lot from the people I met. Moreover, I had the opportunity to do some travelling, which made me fall in love with the region. I hope to go back there someday and I will keep following the work of AFEW with much interest.”

The global HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a major public health issue. Among the countries with the fastest accelerating incidence rates is Kazakhstan, which is characterised by a concentrated epidemic among key populations. Addressing the epidemic requires effective primary prevention, but current methods are often of limited use. PrEP is a new method of HIV prevention consisting of a daily pill combining two anti-retroviral drugs, which has been found very effective when taken consistently. Generally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are seen as the target group for PrEP. As the most developed country in Central Asia, it seems that Kazakhstan could act as a frontrunner in providing PrEP. However, in order to inform the implementation of PrEP, there is a need to understand the awareness and attitudes of MSM towards this new method.

The aim of Marieke Bak’s study was to explore the possibilities for future PrEP initiatives in Kazakhstan by investigating the potential of this prevention method among men who have sex with men. You can find the report on the study findings here.

How Kyiv Fights the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

Author: Yana Kazmirenko, Ukraine

The adoption of the Fast-Track Cities strategy resulted in launching of the HIV express-testing in all outpatient clinics in Ukraine’s capital. The strategy also allowed to increase the number of people who receive antiretroviral therapy.

The struggle against HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kyiv strengthened since the mayor Vitaliy Klitschko, signed the declaration in Paris. Apart from that, Kyiv was included into the Fast-Track Cities programme in April 2016 as a measure to fight AIDS. According to this programme, 90% of the citizens in 2020 should know about the disease, 90% of the infected ones should be getting treatment, and the treatment should be effective for 90% of the patients.

In the latest United Nations agency report on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and UN-Habitat as of 2015, the Ukraine’s capital entered the list of 27 most HIV/AIDS infected cities in the world. Alexander Yurchenko, the head physician at Kyiv AIDS centre, hopes that Kyiv will not be included into the newest rating. The programme has seen first success. 800 medical workers were trained, and every outpatient clinic in Kyiv received express-tests. The result of the test is available in as little as 20 minutes. There were 2,500 more individuals (compared with the previous year) who had tested their blood in a year.

A record amount of 555 people was included into the dispensary registration with the help of express-testing only over the first quarter of 2017. To compare: only 1300 people were registered in 2016, according to Yurchenko.

In his opinion, the situation in Ukraine’s capital with a population of three million people has improved. There were only around 5,000 people getting treatment in 2012, and now there are more than 7,000. It is planned to give treatment to 12,000 people by the end of the year.

Migrants and HIV

Yurchenko attributes Kyiv’s high position in the world ratings of HIV spread due to its attractiveness for migrants. 400,000 people come to work in the capital daily.

“Men who have sex with men (MSM) also tend to come to Kyiv, as it is hard for them to even live in such regional centre as Cherkassy. They attract a lot of attention in smaller cities. In the capital, they can find work, hide themselves, and find partners,” continues the interviewee.

The prevailing factor of HIV spread in Kyiv in 2012 was an injecting way of transmission. Now the predominant way has shifted to sexual transmission.

For instance, the story of the oldest patient in the capital of Ukraine. The man admitted that his wife was refusing sexual intercourse with him and he had to use the services of sex workers.

“Doctor, now I know what I will die from,” the old patient said jokingly, after he heard his diagnosis.

“According to statistics, you will die from cardiac ischemia, but we will control and monitor your HIV,” Yurchenko remembers his dialogue with the patient.

Surviving thanks to the Foundations

Kyiv’s mayor Vitaliy Klitschko stressed that one of the main responsibilities that Kyiv took within the framework of the Fast-Track Cities programme is the provision of sufficient amount of antiretroviral medicines for treatment of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

There would be significant progress in the implementation of the Fast-Track strategy if the government did not delay the supplies of medicines for antiretroviral therapy. This leads to patients receiving one month course of treatment instead of six or three months’ courses.

The variety of options in treatment schemes (around 38 of them) does not yet allow to pass the dispensing of medicines to the family doctors’ level. Yurchenko promised that there will be two or three variants of treatment made, and they will be passed on to the outpatient clinics as soon as the government supplies of medicines are in full scope.

Now patients literally survive at the expense of international and private foundations. On July 11, Kyiv has become the first Eastern European city where HIV-positive patients received dolutegravir (sixth generation medicine for antiretroviral therapy) at the expense of the Elena Pinchuk ANTI AIDS Foundation. The yearly course of medications will cost $170. This allows to increase the number of people who will receive the life-saving treatment in as early as 2018 at no additional cost.

The adoption of the law on mandatory HIV testing* can also bring the capital closer to the standards implemented by Fast-Track Cities. Alexander Yurchenko says that this law might be enacted by the end of the year.

As estimated by the experts, the number of HIV/AIDS infected people in the capital is 23,000 inhabitants. This is the tenth of the estimated figures in Ukraine – 250,000. There were 304,914 officially registered new cases of HIV infection in Ukraine since 1987. Since that time, there were 42,987 deaths from AIDS. The regions most affected with HIV infection, apart from Kyiv, are Dnipropetrovsk, Kyiv, Donetsk, Mykolayiv and Odesa regions.

*AFEW International is not aware of the law on mandatory HIV testing and will advocate against such law.

Central Asian NGOs Built a Network for Cross-Border Control of Tuberculosis

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

During the regional seminar-meeting held on 6-7 June in Almaty, Central Asian nongovernmental organizations established a network of partner organizations to address issues of labour migration and tuberculosis. The participants accepted draft Memorandum of cooperation between non-profit organizations to reduce the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis among migrant workers in the countries of the region.

“This document was created in response to the need of NGOs consolidation to educate migrant workers about TB symptoms and the opportunities of free treatment and diagnostics in the framework of the project, to promote treatment compliance, to exchange information and to disseminate best practices in the countries of Central Asian region,” says a project manager of the Global Fund, a representative of Project HOPE in the Republic of Kazakhstan Bakhtiyar Babamuratov.

The event was organized by the Project HOPE in the framework of the grant from Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Representatives of non-governmental organizations from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan attended the seminar .

Migrants do not want to be treated

From all the countries in the Central Asian region, Kazakhstan is accommodating the main stream of migrant workers from neighbouring countries. Migration flow continues to grow. Those who come to find a job often agree to any work, they often live in poor housing conditions and do not eat well. This results in tuberculosis development. In 2016, 753 external migrants addressed the organizations of primary health care and TB facilities of Kazakhstan and were tested for tuberculosis. In 2015, there were only 157 visits. Most migrant workers prefer not to attend medical institutions and refuse to be treated in the TB clinics or to be examined by a doctor. They consider it to be a wasting of working time, i.e. money. They have to support families left at home, therefore money is the main reason to come to a foreign country. For the same reason people do not want to spend money on health, even though a Comprehensive plan to combat tuberculosis in Kazakhstan for 2014-2020 involves activities to improve TB services for migrant workers.

Particularly alarming are the cases when a migrant worker is diagnosed with HIV/TB co-infection, and when such patient needs a serious treatment and social support. This important topic will be discussed in 2018 in the framework of the 22nd international AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – in Amsterdam. This conference will be very special as for AFEW International and the whole region where the organization works — Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Work at construction sites and markets

In the situation mentioned above, the participation of the NGOs in addressing of this issue has become very important. Outreach workers and volunteers – people, whom the target group trusts, – are searching for migrant workers on construction sites, at the farms, markets, in the restaurants or cafes. They tell migrants about the disease and the free treatment, convince to pass the examination and to provide social support. The results of such work are impressive.

“Within the project, implemented by Project HOPE in 2016, staff and volunteers of our public Fund helped 898 migrant workers to be tested for tuberculosis. For 25 of them the diagnosis was confirmed, and with our assistance people were able to receive free treatment. Besides, we provided migrant workers with motivational food packages. 8,312 labour migrants received information about the symptoms of tuberculosis, and now they know where to go if they are sick,” says the Director of the Public Fund Taldykorgan regional Foundation of employment promotion Svetlana Saduakasova.

These are the results of the activity of only one non-governmental organization in Kazakhstan. Nowadays, social activists are effectively working in eight regions of the country. Such results are possible to achieve only thanks to active collaboration with the non-governmental organizations from those countries where work migrants come from. The community members actively communicate with each other and exchange useful information to be aware of whether the diagnosed person came back to his home city, got registered in the TB clinic, continued to receive treatment, and so on. Only under these conditions we can achieve a complete recovery from TB for each individual and finally stop the growth of morbidity in the region.

Rapid HIV Testing was Discussed in Kyiv

Psychologists, social workers, medical personnel and other employees of four social bureaus in Ukraine gathered for the three-day training Conducting Voluntary Counselling and Testing on HIV with Rapid Tests that AFEW-Ukraine conducted on June 7-9.

“This training was useful because we had a closer look at the regulatory framework in the field of HIV testing, in particular in the work with minors because this procedure always caused many questions,” says Alina, the social worker from Kharkiv. “Besides, it was useful to get the information about personal and professional risks of HIV infection, what to do if such situation happens, and now everything is clear. The session of practical training in the development of pre- and post-test counselling skills has been a pleasure for me. The trainers showed what mistakes a counselor can make during counselling and how to avoid them.”

The aim of the training was to provide the participants with the knowledge and skills on the methodology of counselling related to HIV testing with rapid tests. During three days, the trainers focused on the overview of the HIV epidemic in the world and in Ukraine, aetiology, epidemiology, diagnostics, ways of HIV transmission. Stigma and discrimination, the impact of stigma on the epidemic, legal framework of HIV/AIDS, key elements of ethical and effective HIV counselling practices, pre- and post-test counselling were also discussed during the training.

The training was held within the framework of the project ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ with the financial support of Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In August, AFEW-Ukraine plans to hold a coordination meeting for regional partners to plan the next ‘Bridging the Gaps’ project year.

Harm Reduction: Redirection of Resources Needed

Why do we need action?

Harm reduction is an evidence-based and cost-effective approach to drug policy and practice that is about keeping people who use drugs, their families and communities safe and healthy.

Harm reduction is about saving lives and it works!

Yet many countries still do not provide harm reduction services. According to UNAIDS, between 2010 and 2014 only 3.3% of HIV prevention funds went to programmes for people who inject drugs.

Why now?

Harm Reduction International’s data shows that since 2014, no new countries have established needle and syringe programmes (NSP) and just three have introduced opioid substitution therapy (OST). Of 158 countries where injecting drug use is reported, over half (78) do not offer OST and more than a third (68) still do not provide NSP. In 2015, a UN target to halve HIV transmission among people who inject drugs by 2015 was missed by more than 80%.

These figures are a call to action.

By contrast, each year governments spend over $100 billion on drug control strategies that have little effect on demand for drugs or on those who profit from the drug trade. At the UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs in 2016, governments showed a new willingness to rethink these approaches. But now they must rebalance their spending.

What are we calling for?

We are calling on governments to redirect 10% of the resources currently spent on ineffective punitive responses to drugs and invest it in harm reduction by 2020.

What we will this achieve?

Even this small redirection of funding could achieve big results.

A 10% redirection of funding from drug control to harm reduction by 2020 would:

  • End AIDS among people who inject drugs by 2030.
  • Cover annual hepatitis C prevention need for people who inject drugs. Globally. Twice over.
  • Pay for enough naloxone to save thousands upon thousands of lives every year from opiate overdose.
  • Ensure effective advice, healthcare and emergency responses in the face of newly emerging challenges.
  • Strengthen networks of people who use drugs to provide peer services and campaign for their rights.
What will happen if we don’t act now?

If the adoption of harm reduction in new countries continues at the current pace, it will be 2026 before every country in need has even one or two harm reduction programmes. In the meantime, thousands, if not millions, of lives will be lost.

Source: Harm Reduction International

‘Building a Healthy Future Together’ – AFEW Releases its 2016 Annual Report

AFEW International releases its 2016 Annual Report ‘Building a Healthy Future Together.’ The report highlights AFEW Network’s key activities in the region of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA).

“Now more than ever, key at-risk populations need increased access to health services to combat the three epidemics of HIV, TB and viral hepatitis, something that was highlighted last year in the new World Health Organisation global health sector strategies on HIV and on viral hepatitis,” said Anke van Dam, executive director of AFEW. “Eastern Europe and Central Asia is the only region in the world where new infections of HIV are still on the rise, and where multi-drug resistant TB and viral hepatitis cases, also as co-infection with HIV are so highly prevalent.”

On the road to the 2018 International AIDS Conference that will be held in Amsterdam, last year AFEW International started to engage representatives at all levels to ensure that the relevant issues, successes and challenges from EECA are addressed at AIDS2018.

“With AIDS2018 and through all of our projects detailed in this report, AFEW International continues to contribute to a healthy future for the people of EECA,” says Anke van Dam.

The English version of our Annual Report is available here (download PDF.) The Russian version of the Report can be read here (download PDF.)

The Photo Exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’ was Shown in the Netherlands

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

Last week the photo exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’ was brought to the Netherlands by public Foundation ‘AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan.’ It was possible to see the images of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis during Wolfheze workshops in the Hague on 31 May – 2 June.

The main goal of the exhibition is to reduce stigma and discrimination against people with HIV and tuberculosis.

“We were very lucky with the opportunity to bring the exhibition to the Netherlands and show it to the bigger number of people,” the project manager of AFEW Kazakhstan Kristina Zhorayeva is saying. “Our models were very brave to show their faces and share their personal stories. They wanted to tell people that they are not different and they also have dreams and hopes.”

At the end of March the photo exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’ was shown in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Some people from Kazakhstan saw the images for the first time in the Netherlands though.

“I have heard about this exhibition from AFEW, and today I saw it in the Netherlands even though it was displayed in my native Almaty,” the head doctor of one of the private clinics of Almaty Galiya Tulebayeva is smiling. “I look at these pictures of the patients with pleasure. It is great to see that there are smiles on their faces and they are in positive mood.”

As of February 2017, in Kazakhstan there were registered 29,568 HIV cases. According to the official data, in 2016 there were 14,345 tuberculosis patients registered in the country.

Visitors reviews of the photo exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’

Jamshid Gadoev, WHO Country Office for Combating Tuberculosis, Hepatitis and HIV-AIDS in Uzbekistan:

– Only brave people can show themselves in such a way. They got sick and went through the processes that other people are going through now and do not hesitate to show all of this. On each photo I see a smile. Probably, they are happy with their treatment and are glad that they were rescued. They seem to be happy with their lives.

We also published a book and made a video about what tuberculosis patients feel before, during and after their treatment. We asked our patients to associate tuberculosis with some color, and children were asked to associate it with color and with the animal. Many people said that the disease for them is associated with red, yellow or black. Children usually said that their illness is a red teddy bear. Adults told that for them tuberculosis is black and is associated with the sound of a trumpet. After treatment, these associations often change and colors become brighter.

Alexei Bobrik, WHO technical specialist on HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis, WHO Country Office, Ukraine:

– To overcome the burden of these diseases, it is necessary to talk about this problem so that the population knows about it, and the negative attitude towards the diseases decreases with time. It is necessary to communicate information, so that there is no stigma and discrimination. We must know that normal people are vulnerable to these serious diseases as well.