A Survey on Collaborative TB/HIV Activities in Countries of the WHO European Region

Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV cause significant suffering in Europe. It is estimated that 27,000 patients have both diseases. The distribution of co-infected patients is heterogeneous in Europe. Collaborative activities are needed to take the best care of those with TB/HIV co-infection. This is the background information of the survey on collaborative TB/HIV activities in countries of the WHO European Region created by the Wolfheze working group on collaborative TB/HIV activities.

The Wolfheze group documents and promotes the best models and identifies research priorities of integrated TB/HIV care in the European region. Members of the group also identify barriers in TB/HIV services and collaboration. AFEW’s executive director Anke van Dam is the chair of Wolfheze Working Group on TB/HIV collaborative activities.

What this survey adds:

• All countries have guidelines for management of TB/HIV co-infection.

• Models of care for TB/HIV co-infection differ between countries.

• Collaborative TB/HIV activities as recommended by WHO are not universally implemented.

The full version of the survey is available here.

 

 

Ex-Prisoner in Tajikistan Advocates Healthy Lifestyle

Umed is a participant of the START Plus programme implemented with AFEW-Tajikistan

Author: Nargis Harambaeva, Tajikistan

Umed Boev, age 41, an ex-prisoner from Tajik town of Bokhtar advocates healthy lifestyle among risk groups – people who use drugs, sex workers and ex-prisoners.

In 2001, when Umed was 24, he went to Russia to earn money. He liked partying and spent quite some money on that. In 2004, during one get-together he had a quarrel and a fight, causing another person grievous bodily harm. He was sentenced for 10 years and served his time at Novosibirsk maximum security prison.

While in confinement, Umed tried heroin for the first time. One syringe was often shared by many people. One day his fellow countrymen, who served sentence in the same prison, found out and talked to him.

“They convinced me to stop taking drugs, telling me that prayers would help. I mustered all my will power, it was extremely hard during withdrawal, but I stuck it out. I prayed hard and it really helped me. I stopped using drugs,” tells Umed.

10 years later, when Umed returned home, he was diagnosed with HIV.

“Upon return, I first worked at a construction site, then the crisis hit and the construction was put on hold. I needed money. An acquaintance of mine told me I could donate blood and get some money that way. Therefore, I went to the clinic and they did an HIV test and the result was positive. I was registered with the clinic but I did not take my diagnosis seriously, did not take antiretroviral therapy,” recalls Umed.

Timely request for help

Because of his weak immune system, soon Umed developed tuberculosis.

“In December 2015, I suddenly felt very ill, had a torturing cough for three months. In April 2016, I was taken to a hospital and diagnosed with tuberculosis. I was in a very poor state of health. I could not even walk, had no appetite. During that time, I rapidly lost 20 kilos. Only later doctors told me I turned for help just in time. Another couple of weeks and I would have died. I was treated, and recently when I had fluorography examination tuberculosis was gone. I am so happy about that,” he says.

Today Umed is a participant of the START Plus programme implemented with AFEW-Tajikistan. The purpose of the programme is to reduce the prevalence level of public health concerns like HIV, TB and viral hepatitis at penitentiary facilities and improve the quality of life of persons released from prison.

“I discovered help for people like me when I was diagnosed with tuberculosis. I came to AFEW-Tajikistan local office in Bokhtar. I received food packages as well as assistance in the form of information. Currently, they are helping with the purchase of necessary medicines,” tells Umed.

Becoming part of the Board

Umed is a member of the Board of representatives of key population groups that was organised within AFEW-Tajikistan office in Bokhtar to help persons in risk groups who are neglecting their health.

“There are four of us in the Board. I am responsible for creating awareness among key groups about infectious diseases. These groups include ex-prisoners, people who use drugs and sex workers. We help AFEW-Tajikistan, inform them about the needs of the groups, adjust assistance that is being provided so that it gains better quality and effectiveness,” says Umed.

By the way, one of the topics of the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam is prison health. Other public health issues like HIV, hepatitis and TB in Eastern Europe and Central Asia will be also in focus during AIDS 2018.

HIV in Georgia: is there any stigma

Author: Irma Kakhurashvili, Georgia

Our meeting with David Ananiashvili was appointed in a green courtyard of the Infectious Diseases, AIDS and Clinical Immunology Research Centre. The Centre is located in an old building in one of the central districts of Tbilisi, Georgia. The authorities have been promising a new working space for the centre since long ago, but so far there has been no progress in this process. However, David feels at home – he knows every corner here. He was one of the first people in Georgia who publicly spoke about their HIV status. David is the head of the Georgian Plus Group NGO. Since 2000, the NGO has been implementing various projects to protect the rights of people living with HIV and standing up to stigma and discrimination.

In the meeting room, David says that the civil society sector in the area of HIV/AIDS is quite small. Besides, there are not many resources available to fight stigma. In Georgia, all people have access to free HIV treatment (antiretroviral therapy is available and accessible for patients since 2004 through the grant of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria), while stigma is one of the main factors hindering access to testing of HIV. David says that most stigma-related issues may be observed in health facilities, in the relations between doctors and patients. The HIV-related stigma in the healthcare system – both in state-run and in private clinics – is so strong that sometimes doctors and other medical personnel do not provide the required high-quality services. There have been cases when doctors refused to perform life-saving surgeries if their patients had HIV.

Stigma is reinforced by myths

The situation is worse in regions of the country, especially in smaller towns and villages where patients are afraid of social isolation and are reluctant to disclose their status even to their family members. Here, the HIV diagnosis still leads to the feelings of panic and helplessness as it used to be in the 80s.

“HIV is a stigmatized disease causing a number of emotional and social problems. Stigma is reinforced by a variety of myths, for instance, that HIV is a result of the person being irresponsible, practising immoral behaviours or using drugs,” explains David.

The community of people living with HIV in Georgia is not as open as it should be but David believes that everything has its time and that this issue may be resolved. Current scale of the response to hepatitis C may serve as a good example. Until 2015, people in Georgia had never talked out loud about this disease, but after the government started the national program of hepatitis C elimination the ice was broken: many people were able to recognize they had hepatitis and start effective treatment.

In the nearest future, hepatitis C elimination programme will also include screening for HIV, which means that the patients who are tested for hepatitis C will also be screened for HIV. The initiator of this idea – AIDS Centre – is sure that integrated services will significantly improve the HIV detection rates. David says that countering stigma requires a comprehensive approach instead of one-sided efforts.

Strategic plans

The estimated number of people living with HIV in Georgia is 12,000 people. Apart from countering stigma and discrimination, the main goal in the AIDS response is detection of the new HIV cases.

David says that there is a need to bring up the issue of preventive treatment of discordant couples in Georgia. Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV (PrEP) is a new method of HIV prevention. PrEP provides additional protection in cases when people do not use condoms for whatever reason.

David Ananiashvili and his colleagues plan to make their contribution to the development of a new National Strategic Plan to Fight HIV/AIDS. Its main objectives will be delivery of services to vulnerable groups and further scale up of prevention programmes.

“We would like to implement a new project by creating a consortium to make sure that in future our services – counselling centre, mobile clinics, outreach services, group activities, etc – and interventions are explicitly described in the HIV/AIDS strategic plan and to add new services to the existing ones. We will conduct focus groups, identify common challenges and needs to analyse and understand which services are needed for vulnerable populations and which of them are more effective,” says David.

Persecution and Activism of Sex Workers in Kyrgyzstan

Author: Olga Ochneva, Kyrgyzstan

For almost a year and a half, law enforcement agencies have been persecuting sex workers in Kyrgyzstan. During this period, the number of sex workers receiving HIV prevention services in some regions of the country reduced twice. Civil society organisations registered more than 450 cases of sex workers’ rights violations by the police every year.

Extortion, detentions, and threats

In 2017, 81% of all reports of abuse and human rights violations submitted to the Shah-Aiym Sex Workers Network were complaints against police officers on extortion. Shah-Aiym documents such cases with the support of Soros Foundation-Kyrgyzstan and street lawyers of public associations all over Kyrgyzstan within the framework of the Global Fund via Soros Foundation-Kyrgyzstan. Both sources recorded 475 cases of sex workers’ rights violations by law enforcement agencies in 2016 and 459 cases in 2017. Most often, those are cases of extortion, arbitrary detention, threats, blackmailing, pressure and degrading treatment.

“The wave of mass raids started in mid-2016 when City Directorate of Internal Affairs in Bishkek announced that it was going to “clean the city by getting rid of prostitution.” They even asked local people to conduct night raids, make photos of sex workers and pass such photos on to the policemen,” tells Shahnas Islamova, head of NGO Tais Plus. “At first, press service of the Chief Directorate of Internal Affairs was reporting detentions, not even hesitating or not understanding that they were, in fact, announcing unlawful acts of the law enforcement agencies.”

In Kyrgyzstan, sex work is decriminalized, which means that it is neither an administrative nor a criminal offense. To punish sex workers, law enforcers use other provisions of the Administrative Offences Code. Most often, sex workers are detained for alleged disorderly conduct or petty crimes.

“Sex workers try to avoid court proceedings: they buy off. There are some cases when law enforcers know what a girl does to earn her living and start blackmailing her. They threaten to take photos of the girls, tell their relatives about their occupation or take them to a police station, so the girls agree to pay: the standard charge is up to 1,000 soms ($15),” tells Alina (the name is changed), a street lawyer of a civil society organization. “If girls try to defend their rights, law enforcers find other ways to detain them: they draft reports of disorderly conduct or failure to obtain registration. Those who have bad luck or are not able to buy off may be arrested for three to five days.”

According to Alina, many sex workers have gone underground: they often change their rented apartments and phone numbers. Such situation in some regions of the country hinders the access of NGOs to sex workers to conduct HIV prevention interventions: distribute condoms, offer testing, conduct awareness-raising activities, and consultations.

“Since the start of the “purge”, our organization has been monitoring the dynamics in the coverage of sex workers with prevention programmes in Bishkek,” says the head of Tais Plus NGO. “In a year and a half, the coverage has reduced twice, and in the second quarter of 2017 the actual indicator went down to 39% of the planned coverage.”

Activism in the challenging environment

Mass raids of 2016-2017 echoed almost in every region of the country. Groups of people who explained their actions with the “religious motives and interests of the society” helped law enforcers in their “fight” against sex workers. As the end of 2017 approached, things calmed down: sex workers got used to the new conditions, while the pressure from the side of police weakened a bit and the mass raids ended. However, “police marks” stipulating sex workers paying money to the law enforcers for the so-called “protection” and “permit to work” are still there.

“Currently, in most cases pimps are the ones to keep contact with police, while there are almost no girls who work on their own,” says Nadezhda Sharonova, director of the Podruga Charitable Foundation about the situation in Osh. “Recently, our street lawyer has been more and more often reporting complaints of sex workers against their pimps who beat and blackmail the girls.”

Despite the fact that civil society organizations in Kyrgyzstan offer legal support, sex workers rarely report their offenders. Representative of the Tais Plus NGO thinks that this fact is easy to explain: to go through all the legal prosecution process, one needs boldness and strength as well as certain savings – not to cover the legal expenses, but to be able not to work for a while and keep out of the law enforcers’ sight.

At the same time, the sex workers movement is growing and becoming stronger. The Shah-Aiym Network unites sex workers in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Russia. The network documents human rights violations and provides support to the victims of human rights violations, actively protects the interests of sex workers’ community and publicly campaigns against violence towards sex workers. The network ensures conditions for strengthening activists’ capacity to claim and defend their rights.

“We have seen cases when sex workers defend themselves,” says Shahnas Islamova. “For instance, at the court hearings on administrative offenses some sex workers now openly say that they are engaged into sex work and do not violate any laws, while the police has violated the law when detaining them. As a result, such sex workers have left the courtroom free from any accusations.”

AIDS 2018 March in Amsterdam

AFEW International received the invitation to join AIDS 2018 march in Amsterdam, and we are sharing this message with you. Please fill in the form below in case you are planning to join the march:

Hello everybody,

In a couple of months the International AIDS Conference 2018 will be held in Amsterdam. We are excited and are looking forward to work together with activists all over the world and make this event one to be remembered.

As you might know from previous conferences, traditionally there will be a march or demonstration of HIV and AIDS activists. This year the march will take place just before the official opening of the conference at the RAI Amsterdam Convention Centre in the afternoon of Monday, 23rd of July 2018. With this email we would like to introduce us to you and ask you to join us in the march/demonstration to raise our voices for and with people living with HIV.

We are aware that we might be a little ahead of time. But it gives us together with you more time to activate more people and to organise a good march in cooperation with the local authorities. Please forward this email to more organisations, people, living with HIV or relatives and friends you know and who might like to become part or support the march. 

For some organisational matters we kindly ask you to let us know if you and your organization are interested in updates or possibly want to get  involved. You can do so by filling out an online form: https://goo.gl/forms/ahKbXV9xO2gRSmnd2

You will soon hear from us again (if you want).

Kind regards,
Alexander P. &
Hans V.  &
Alexander S.

Source: www.aidsactioneurope.org

Post-Soviet Countries Need a Single Document on HIV in the Field of Migration

Presidium of the seminar

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

In the post-Soviet countries, there is no single document that would regulate the issues of HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for migrants as well as their legal status. Migrant workers do not get the adequate services in the countries where they work which inevitably leads to the decline of their health status and to the growth of the HIV epidemic in the region. This message was the main one in the discussion at the sub-regional technical seminar in Astana, Kazakhstan on February 19-20, 2018. The event was organized by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in cooperation with the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

HIV rates continue to grow in EECA only

The seminar became a platform for a dialogue between representatives of governments, international and non-governmental public organizations from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Russia, Uzbekistan and interested regional partners.

Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic and the Republic of Tajikistan Dirk Jan Kop

“The incidence of HIV is predominantly stabilizing around the world. Even if the indicators are very high, they do not grow. However, in Central Asia and Eastern Europe (EECA), HIV incidence is increasing. HIV is not a problem of marginalized groups only. HIV is closer than you think. It must and can be stopped, also it must be stopped in Central Asia,” says Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic and the Republic of Tajikistan Dirk Jan Kop.

This concern was supported by all the participants after considering the situation, strategies used in different countries, best practices, main priorities for the effective response to the HIV epidemic among labor migrants.

The way HIV affects labor migration

Labor migration and HIV prevalence are increasing. This already became a stable trend of the region. There are numerous examples where migrant workers with HIV have no access to antiretroviral therapy in the places of temporary residence. Legislation of some countries provides for the deportation of foreign citizens with HIV. Migrant workers often experience stigma and discrimination.

UNFPA Regional Director for EECA countries Alanna Armitage

“Recent epidemiological surveillance data in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan have shown that the prevalence of HIV among people returning from labor migration is 2-4 times higher than among the general population. Migrant workers from Central Asian countries face serious challenges in access to the full information and adequate HIV prevention, care and treatment services,” said UNFPA Regional Director for EECA countries Alanna Armitage.

Experts unanimously admit that better access to HIV prevention and treatment in Central Asian countries is the key to elimination of the HIV epidemic.

Aid for migrants with HIV started in Kazakhstan

In 2018, HIV-positive migrants in Kazakhstan begin to receive aid with the support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Treatment and laboratory testing will be provided to 150 people.

“Kazakhstan is a country with a low HIV prevalence. Last year, more than 16,000 foreigners were tested for HIV. 0.2% HIV cases were found. If we take the vulnerable groups only, this figure among foreigners will reach nine percent,” says the vice-minister of health of the Republic of Kazakhstan Lyazzat Aktayeva.

In a country where migrants with HIV do not have to be deported, 61 thousand people were tested. This is a heavy burden on the national budget. So far, migrant workers have no legal status and opportunities to receive even a minimal medical service are very limited. Therefore, we need new strategies for working with this category of the population and not only within a single country.

First shot in the battle

The participants called the seminar the first shot in the battle for an overall strategy for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of migrants in the post-Soviet space. The creation of a special structure located in Russia as the biggest receiving country of migrant workers was approved to regulate this process.

Recommendations of the seminar will be presented for discussions at the forthcoming international conferences on HIV/AIDS, which will take place this year: The VI International AIDS Conference for Eastern Europe and Central Asia (April, Moscow) and 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 (July, Amsterdam).

Happy with HIV in Tajikistan

Tajik wedding. Source: wikimedia.org

Author: Nargis Hamrabaeva, Tajikistan

A Tadjik girl Nozanin was diagnosed with HIV after her husband-migrant returned home a few years ago. As the man has found it out, he walked out on her… Now the 40-year-old woman is happily married again.

Everything was like a fairy tale

“It happened unexpectedly, like in a fairy tale. Once I was taking care of the household, when my friend, who liked me, called. He said that he would come with a mullah (a clergyman conducting the wedding ceremony according to the Muslim canons – editor’s note) and some of our colleagues. They really came. After the religious wedding ceremony, we went to his parents,” Nozanin is saying.

This friend turned out to be a client of the Republican Network of Women Living with HIV, where Nozanin has been working. He was also HIV positive. He wanted to marry a woman with the same status and Nozanin somehow even tried to find him a suitable candidate. It turned out that the man was already in love with her…

“I never thought that I could ever get married again, especially having HIV status,” she says.

Today Nozanin considers herself to be a happy woman. Together with her husband they have a lot of plans and ideas, and they also want to give birth to a healthy child. Many couples living with HIV have the same desire.

A marriage contract is not needed

700 people in Tajikistan receive support from the Republican Network of Women Living with HIV. For the most part, these are young people who want to start a happy family.

Tahmina Haydarova, the head of the network, says that young men between the ages of 18 and 35 come to them searching for a soulmate with the same HIV status. Often these are labor migrants, former drug users or prisoners who have never been married before. Brides are usually those who have already been married. These women contracted the virus from a migrant husband or partner who used drugs.

Such brides do not ask to sign a marriage contract; they do not ask for an apartment or dacha. The most important thing for them is the timely use of antiretroviral therapy by their future spouse and a healthy life.

HIV is not a barrier

Each year the Republican Network of Women Living with HIV helps at least 5-6 young HIV positive people to find their spouses. Takhmina Haydarova is telling about 10 couples who decided to start a family with the fact that one of the spouses is HIV positive.

“If a person loves and accepts you for who you are, then HIV is not an obstacle to start a family. Today antiretroviral drugs that block the HIV are available. A person living with HIV with a suppressed viral load can start a family, give birth to a healthy child, live a full and happy life the way our clients do,” she says.

According to the Republican AIDS Center, the total number of HIV positive citizens in Tajikistan has reached 10 thousand people, one third of them are women. Since 2004, women with HIV have given birth to 1,000 children, 600 of these children have no HIV.

Shrinking Civil Society Space Hinders NGO Activities in EECA

The results of the assessment proved to be the basis for rewarding discussions during AFEW Regional autumn school in Almaty, Kazakhstan last year where the first findings were presented

Author: Aïcha Chaghouani, The Netherlands

Different trends of more restrictive legislation hinder the development of a healthy, independent and diverse civil society in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). Shrinking civil society space in the EECA countries is making the work of many non-governmental organisations more difficult.

NGOs play a crucial role in the development of effective HIV/AIDS responses. Non-governmental organisations meaningfully involve community key population groups for a better understanding of their needs. The experts are saying that the limited space that NGOs are allowed to maneuver in, is threatening the effectiveness of national and regional policies to contain and stop the growth of the HIV epidemic in the region.

AFEW’s assessment of the situation

Many NGOs in the EECA region, especially those working with key populations and in the field of harm reduction, are currently facing significant challenges. International donors are withdrawing from the region while most local governments are unwilling and/or failing to take over. The withdrawal of funds together with the shrinking civil society space are threatening the investments made and progresses achieved in the last decades in the field of HIV/AIDS.

AFEW International’s experts Janine Wildschut and Magdalena Dabkowska conducted a mixed-methods research to explore the process of shrinking civil society space in the EECA countries, how this affects NGOs and how they are coping with it. With this research, AFEW has gained more insights and learned how NGOs are currently dealing with those challenges. The research is part of AFEW’s regional approach within Bridging the Gaps: health and rights of key populations project.

Coping strategies and regional exchange

The ultimate aim of the research was to assess the coping strategies in a context of shrinking space of civil society in EECA.

“I believe that these coping strategies are vital in the current circumstances and demonstrate the big resilience of the communities and NGOs working with key populations,” says AFEW’s director of programmes Janine Wildschut.

The research was conducted in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Poland, Tajikistan, Russia and Uzbekistan.  This mixed-method research consisted of a general primary assessment of the whole region, semi-structured interviews with NGOs and donors, and a survey.

AFEW’s experts believe that by mapping different strategies AFEW is able to facilitate a regional exchange of success and failure stories in which NGOs can learn from each other’s experiences. The identification of different strategies helps organizations to develop more comprehensive coping mechanisms in the current contexts.

“We hope to raise more awareness with donors about the situation of NGOs in the shrinking space of civil society, and will offer coping tools to NGOs,” says Janine Wildschut.

Fight, hide or unite

The outcomes of the research identified three main resilience strategies NGOs adopted in order to overcome the challenges. They are: fight – opposing the authorities, hide – opposing, allying or neutral but out of sight and silent, and unite – allying with the authorities. All interviewed NGOs had different reasons to choose one of these three paths.

AFEW International’s experts Janine Wildschut and Magdalena Dabkowska conducted a mixed-methods research to explore the process of shrinking civil society space in the EECA countries, how this affects NGOs and how they are coping with it

“We want to be more diplomatic. If you are being too much of an activist, you can also just break your organization,” an NGO employee from Tajikistan said.

For some organizations, it was possible to create alliances with the local or national authorities and still continue their work while for others, creating these alliances meant stopping or changing part of their core activities.

“We believe that it is actually ethically wrong to be in alliance with this government. We also do not try to be invisible for them. We do not do anything illegal so we do not hide anything,” a Russian NGO employee said. “There is no law we are violating so there is nothing to hide. If they want to change or stop us we just go to court. We have a lot of strategic activities including cases against the government.”

Further discussion 

Which out of ‘fight, hide or unite’ positions is the most suitable for an NGO, depends on the characteristics of the organization, the context it is operating in and the beliefs of its employees.

“The different paths identified by the assessment could serve as a fruitful basis for further discussion and to build strategic plans on how to deal in such situations. AFEW can facilitate a valuable exchange of best-practices between NGOs. Besides, the discussion can serve as a way to grow awareness and understanding about why a certain NGO takes a specific position, which can prevent undesired conflicts between civil society organisations themselves,” says Janine Wildschut from AFEW International.

The results of the assessment proved to be the basis for rewarding discussions during AFEW Regional autumn school in Almaty, Kazakhstan last year where the first findings were presented. In spring of 2018, the official report will be published and will be available online.

Bridging the Gaps in Clinical Guideline to Care in Pregnancy for Women Using Psychoactive Substances

All the regions of Kyrgyzstan already received the developed clinical guideline

The estimate number of people who use injected drugs (PWID) in Kyrgyzstan is about 25,000 people. Many of these people are women. Such is the data from the research that was conducted within the framework of the Global Fund’s grant in 2013.

Applying recommendations in practice

In 2016, Public Fund (PF) Asteria, a community based organisation that protects rights of women who use drugs in Kyrgyzstan, applied to AFEW-Kyrgyzstan seeking for a help in developing a clinical guideline to care in pregnancy for women who use drugs. Within the framework of the project Bridging the Gaps: health and rights for key populations, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan decided to support this initiative as there were no modern standards for working with women who use drugs in the country before. A working group that included an expert in narcology, an obstetrician-gynecologist, an expert in evidence-based medicine, and a representative of the community of women who use drugs was created. In January 2017, the clinical guideline “Care in pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium for women who use psychoactive substances” was approved by the order of the Ministry of Health and became mandatory for doctors’ use.

“When the guideline was approved, we realized that it is not enough to simply distribute it among the doctors. It was necessary to organize a comprehensive training for the family doctors, obstetrician-gynecologists and other specialists so that they could not only apply the developed recommendations in practice, but also share their experience with their colleagues,” said Chinara Imankulova, project manager of the Bridging the Gaps: health and rights of key populations at AFEW-Kyrgyzstan.

In April 2017, trainings were organized for the teachers of Kyrgyz State Medical Institute for postgraduate students. The manuals for teachers with presentations have been developed so that in the future trained teachers could deliver reliable information to the course participants. This approach gives an opportunity to train all healthcare professionals in the country and provides them with an access to the protocol.

In August 2017, trainings were offered to obstetrician-gynecologists of the centers of family medicine and obstetrical institutions. During the trainings, specialists got acquainted with the latest research in this field, studied the peculiarities of pregnancy, prenatal and postnatal period of women, who use drugs, as well as ways to avoid or minimize the risks of drug exposure to women and children.

“Two or three years ago, when our pregnant women who use drugs visited doctors, they were afraid that doctors would force them to have an abortion. In September 2017, our client Victoria, who at that time was on methadone therapy, visited the obstetrician-gynecologist. Victoria gave birth to a healthy girl, and doctors treated Victoria and her child very well. Moreover, the doctor even helped Victoria to get methadone so she could spend enough time in the hospital for rehabilitation after the childbirth,” said Tatiana Musagalieva, a representative of PF Asteria.

Women should not be discriminated

During the trainings, 100 specialists who are working in the republic of Kyrgyzstan were trained. Doctors from the regional centers were also invited for the training. It is very important to provide access to quality medical services for women who use drugs in the rural areas. Doctors also learned to get rid of their stigma towards women who use drugs and always treat them with respect. A class on stigma and discrimination was taught by women from the community of drug users. They told the participants of the training their stories, talked about how difficult it was when doctors refused to treat them or insulted them. This part was useful in reducing stigma and discrimination among doctors, in showing them that women who use drugs are just like the others.

“Before the training I met several pregnant women who use drugs. To be honest, I was not sure that they could give birth to healthy children. Having received the clinical protocol, and with the knowledge I have got in the training, I realized that these women should not be discriminated. I learned about scientific recommendations for conducting pregnancy in the situations that cannot do harm to either mother or child. This helped me a lot,” said the participant of the training, obstetrician-gynecologist Kaliyeva Burul.

All the regions of the republic already received the developed clinical guideline. Doctors who have been trained, share their experiences with their colleagues and help women who use drugs to safely plan their pregnancies and give births to healthy children. AFEW-Kyrgyzstan continues to monitor the work of specialists who have been trained, and monitors if all health specialists have access to the guideline. In the future, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan will continue to work on improving the quality of life of people who use drugs, and will monitor the usage of this protocol by doctors.

Spices – New Threat for the Tajik Youth

Photo source: http://brosaem.info

Author: Nargis Hamrabaeva, Tajikistan

While several years ago Tajikistan was concerned with young people being into opiates and stronger synthetic drugs, today there are concerns about the new-generation drugs – so-called spices.

Spicy naswar

The official reports of law enforcement agencies fail to contain any data on the seizure of spices. However, a quick survey among the young people showed that those smoking blends have long been popular in the country.

Spices are the smoking blends, which contain dry herbs and roots. The dried components themselves are not dangerous, but to make the smokers feel a more intense euphoria, the producers add cannabinoids, which are strong narcotic substances. 

“For what I know, earlier spices were distributed in the nightclubs, but now they are mostly sold in the internet and through the grapevine. I also heard that sometimes naswar – the type of smokeless tobacco typical for Central Asia, containing tobacco and alkali (hydrated lime), which is popular among many local people – is processed in the same way as the spices,” says Aziz, a student from Dushanbe.

“Rich kids” having fun

Our anonymous respondent who has 20 years of experience working at law enforcement agencies said that it would not be right to say that young people in Tajikistan are addicted to spices, but this threat should not be disregarded.

“Yes, spices can be easily accessed, but their price is higher than the price of marijuana which young people have traditionally been smoking and continue smoking now. After the heroin “rush” at the turn of the century, many people who use drugs have been massively switching to marijuana and opiates. They strongly believe that marijuana is not more harmful than cigarettes,” he says.

According to him, spices are mostly used in nightclubs by those, who have enough money for it – the so-called “rich kids.”

“They think that spices do not cause addiction and that they can quit using them whenever they want as opposed to opiates and heroin,” says the law enforcer.

Spices do not have the euphoric effects they used to

However, Dr. Mahmadrahim Malakhov who studied the sociocultural aspects of the substance use in Tajikistan, says that the dependence develops much quicker when using spices than when using natural marijuana.

Meanwhile, the exact number of people who use drugs in Tajikistan is not known. Doctors say that few people who use drugs seek medical assistance when they want to quit. They are the ones who are included in the official statistics, which shows that there are a little more than 7 thousand people who use drugs in the country.

Last year, Tajik law enforcers seized about 4.5 tons of narcotic drugs, which is 29.8% more than the year before.

“In particular, 110 kg of heroin, 1.2 tons of raw opium, 2.4 tons of hashish and 742 kg of cannabis drugs were seized. The offences of 52 criminal groups consisting of 115 individuals were investigated and terminated, including five organized transnational groups,” said Murtazo Khaidarzoda, Deputy Head of the Drug Control Agency of the Republic of Tajikistan at the press conference.