Study tours help the public and non-public sectors to hear and see each other

For many years, NGOs have been engaged in study tours with visits to various organizations and institutions in other countries. While experience shows that not all study tours are equally useful – sometimes practices that work well abroad are incompatible with local realities – study tours have overall proven to provide participants with new knowledge and valuable practices that can be applied.

AFEW-Ukraine, partner in the “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations” programme, has noticed that at the local level partners benefit from sharing knowledge and experiences. Whereas each organization has its own reality and experience, NGOs all work in similar conditions. Since 2016, AFEW-Ukraine is regularly involved in the organisation of study tours for representatives of public organizations and government agencies, and colleagues working in other regions of Ukraine.

For Oleksandr Mohylka, Project Coordinator at the Compass Social House (KCF “Blago”, Kharkiv) and Nataliia Zlatopolska, Project Coordinator at the Altair Youth Friendly Center (PRCF “Public Health”, Poltava) study tours in Ukraine have proven to be an inspiration for bringing about change in their organisations and for their work with adolescents using drugs.

Where?

Oleksandr: As part of the project “Bridging the Gaps” this year, two social workers and me went to the CF “New Family” in Chernivtsi and their Psychosocial support center “Dialogue”. We wanted to know about their rehab program for teens. This was important for us because we wanted to provide rehabilitation services for adolescents who use drugs.

Nataliia: We had two trips to Kropyvnytskyi and Kharkiv. In Kropyvnytskyi we visited colleagues from the Social bureau “Lily” (CF “Return to Life”) and their partners in the city. In addition to Altair employees, we included representatives of the center for vocational training education, the department of juvenile prevention and the city center for family, children and youth.

The choice of partners for the trip was not accidental. For example, the practice has shown that our clients are mainly students of vocational schools, and through direct interaction with management, it is easier to connect with this group, to make our work process systematic to reach more people and achieve positive dynamics. Juvenile prevention redirects clients to us, and we engage them in training project leaders.

In Kharkiv, we had the opportunity to get acquainted with the experience of their Compass Center. First of all, we were interested in what tools the organization uses to work with our target audience, and how their partners’ network works.

Goal

Oleksandr: We had a very tight trip. It was interesting how the rehabilitation was organized – statutes on rehabilitation, the program, orders of local authorities etc. This is what we can apply now in our everyday work. It was interesting to learn how it all began to work, why there was a need for certain documents, what mechanisms these documents regulate, what is the role of the City Coordination Mechanism. We were also interested in the interaction of the “New Family” with the Coordination Council since this is a positive experience of interaction.

Nataliia: We had a meeting with the deputy mayor of Kropyvnytskyi for humanitarian issues, a dialogue showed that the public sector in Kropyvnytskyi understands what benefits it has from working with NGOs. Project specialists proved the importance of interacting with them with the help of numbers, statistics, cases, and stories. And we took this experience forward.

We also saw how the ideas of the project clients are implemented. We saw that they are really possible to fulfil. And these are not just dreams – it is actually possible to realize the ideas of adolescents. For example, we liked the idea of ​​sketching the addresses of Telegram drug distribution channels, not on their own, but using the resources of the city.

What was learned?

Oleksandr: It was after the trip to Chernivtsi that we made a firm decision that we would do a rehabilitation program. And we realized that we should do our own program, not the same as in Chernivtsi. The drug scene and, accordingly, the behaviour of adolescents and the consequences of using drugs change. Thanks to the trip to Chernivtsi, we now better understand how to take into account the unique experience of our colleagues and to make our rehabilitation program maximally meet modern challenges. We have already presented our idea to the Coordinating Council of Kharkiv. In the new City drug program, the development and support of a rehabilitation center for youth are now registered on the basis of our Social home! We were inspired by their experience and success; we saw that this is all real in our country. Moreover, now, apart from the “Dialogue”, no one is doing rehabilitation separately for teenagers in Ukraine. We always say that in Ukraine we have the experience of a successful rehabilitation center for adolescents and that we learn from them and are ready to contribute.

Nataliia: We “brought” new work tools home – for example, a step-by-step mechanism for referral clients from our city partners (educational and law enforcement agencies, social services, etc.) to us. In Kropyvnytskyi, if one of the key partners discovers a teenager who is probably using drugs, he or she will immediately be redirected to the social bureau “Lily”. And we studied communication mechanisms, registration log and so on. We also liked the practice of the leaders’ school. In addition, we spied on the work in the organizations themselves, how employees interact and were inspired by their atmosphere.

Results

Oleksandr: Study tours with partners to colleagues from Ukraine are a very high-quality mechanism for obtaining of well-deserved trust from government bodies and our main partners – the police, social services, educational and medical institutions. Such joint actions help them understand that we are doing real things, we are doing things that government agencies are not doing because of limited resources, instructions or something else. But the main thing is that we complement their work very well. We let them know that we are ready to help and train. We noticed that upon returning, even the level of relations changed, as well as the number of redirects to the Center. At the same time, during such study tours, we ourselves see how government bodies work and what kind of help they need.

Nataliia: Study tours help the public and non-public sectors to hear and see each other. Employees of various services in different cities may have different views, but this does not prevent them from communicating and sharing experiences and thoughts. They can understand what powerful resources we have, and that we really bridge the gaps in their work, too. Previously, for example, various myths were circulating about NGOs in our city that interfere with the organization’s work. After this visit, all questions of officials were removed, and the level of mutual trust continues to grow.

With the organisation of study tours, AFEW-Ukraine thus fosters in-country processes and partnerships to reinforce results in line with Bridging the Gaps Theory of Change. The organisation contributes to deliver and advocate continuously for strengthening services and upholding human rights for adolescents who use drugs in Ukraine.

 

 

The 3rd regional autumn school in Bishkek

On October 29, AFEW partners came together in Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, for 3 days to take part in the annual Autumn School, which is organized within the project “Bridging the Gaps: health and rights of key populations“.

The great energy of the participants and amazing nature gave a chance to everyone to enjoy the event and to discuss important issues on prevention and treatment of #HIV, harm reduction, migration, and financing in the region of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Participants in the Autumn School included representatives of AFEW partners from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, Russia, and the Netherlands, sub-recipients of the project “Bridging the Gaps”, as well as other partners and experts including those from Great Britain and the USA.

Active space

The Autumn School quickly became an active space for discussion: about strategy, barriers, innovations, and partnership opportunities between the participating organizations. During the first day, participants shared updates on the “Bridging the Gaps” project and activities in their countries – Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine, and Tajikistan. The afternoon session was devoted to a World Café, in which partners exchanged ideas and developed specific actions to overcome challenges that they often encounter in their work.

The second day was devoted to the topic “Stimulant use and chemsex”. Benjamin Collins, director of International HIV Partnership (IHP), which partners with medical and community activists across Europe and the Middle East for successful responses to HIV and viral hepatitis, joined the Autumn School in Bishkek to share his experience on chemsex . The topic of (problematic) chemsex was further elaborated in the presentations of Monty Moncrieff, Chief Executive of London Friend, a London charity working to promote the health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people, and Daria Alexeeva, program director of AFEW International. Monty spoke about the London experience in harm reduction, while Daria presented materials of Nikolay Lyuchenkov, an infectious disease doctor and expert on sexual health issues from Russia, which were focused on trends and responses to chemsex in Russia and EECA region.

 

The third and final day of the conference was devoted to workshops on migration, rehabilitation and financial sustainability. Evgeniya Alekseeva, director of Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS-MEDIA”, presented analysis of NGOs funding situation in EECA region; Elena Zhirnova, manager of the project “Our Choice: Empowering Vulnerable Women in Kyrgyzstan” (AFEW-Kyrgyzstan) told about challenges and opportunities of social entrepreneurship in the country; and Fatima Yakupbayeva, co-founder of law firm “PRECEDENT” and publisher of the book “From Grant to Business Project”, shared auditing resources for launching a business model and recommendations on how to implement business ideas.

 

The session on migration started with a presentation by Rukhshona Kurbonova, coordinator of the Migrant Health Programs at International Organization for Migration in Tajikistan. She talked about labor migration in Central Asia, while Zulaika Esentaeva (IOM Kyrgyzstan) shared their experience on service-delivery by IOM Kyrgyzstan for vulnerable migrants.

The session on rehabilitation was devoted to building information campaigns. During the session, Marina Govorukhina, specialist on strategic communications and branding, author of the books “Communications in Public Organizations”, “Strategic Communications in Public Organizations”, demonstrated specific techniques of developing informational marketing campaigns for rehabilitation centers to the participants from Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine.

Moreover, the School included a 2-day training for AFEW communication managers, during which participants focused on learning about storytelling and SMM in the context of NGOs.

 

 

Natalya Shumskaya, director of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan

I especially noted the session on new psychoactive substances. This topic is relevant for our country, as sexual ways of HIV transmission keep growing in Kyrgyzstan, and new psychoactive substance use impacts sexual behavior. For us it is a wonderful opportunity to take on the experience of those countries that have already faced similar problems, and elaborate effective strategies for preventative measures in our country.

The third day was remarkable due to the acute topic of sustainability of civil society organizations. We all see the tendency of decreasing donor support in our countries. That means that civil society should aim to ensure financial sustainability independently, and one of the opportunities is the development of social entrepreneurship. During this meeting we shared the experience of creating our own social enterprise – a beauty salon. I would like to especially point out the session by Fatima Yakupbayeva from the “Precedent” company. She gave us specific business-ideas, which could be developed by an NGO in order to earn money independently and further direct it to realization of our statutory goals.

The importance of this event is in sharing and exchange of experience. When the financial support for our organizations is not that high, it is important to avoid duplication of activities, and, on the other hand, to consolidate our efforts in order to realize our main strategic goals. For instance, the past regional meetings allowed us to bring good practices of working with youth at risk from Ukraine to our country. We are very grateful that we didn’t have to be the pioneers in this, but rather adapt and use their experience. Also, I think that the experience of Kyrgyzstan will be useful to some of our colleagues, and they will be able to apply it in their countries.

Monty Moncrieff MBE, Chief Executive of London Friend

It’s important for people working in the region on the same issues to have the opportunity to come together and share their knowledge and experience. It helps build the data on important topics, and enables participants to share what they’re seeing locally, as well as share tips on how to address new and emerging trends. It also helps build relationships, which spark ideas for new partnerships. Even though the internet gives us great opportunities to connect and work together online it’s difficult to get that richness of connection without bringing people together in person, and doing so for a number of days provides lots of opportunities for conversations outside the formal sessions.

We can always learn from one another, and hopefully by inviting people who have been working on issues for some time in other countries we can bring the benefit of that experience. We can share leaning about what’s worked and what hasn’t for us, and hopefully that can benefit people who are only starting to see these issues emerge locally.

Evgeniya Alekseeva, PHD in medical sciences, Director of Public Health and Social Development Foundation “FOCUS-MEDIA”

Meetings such as the Autumn School are important, because they bring together people from different countries and cities, create space for discussing acute issues and situations in our field, allow to form alliances, agree about partnerships, as well as have informal conversations and take a break from the daily routine.

At the Autumn School in Bishkek, I especially noted a very interesting session on chemsex, sessions on business projects for NGOs, and on migration. I will certainly use this knowledge further while writing proposals, developing new projects and creating new ideas.

Zarina Siyakova, program coordinator of the Tajik Network of Women Living with HIV

This meeting provided me with a great opportunity to learn more about what is happening in other countries in regards to promoting prevention and treatment of HIV. I especially noted the session on chemsex, as I hadn’t had a chance to encounter this issue before. I was particularly interested in the presentation by Monty Moncrieff, as well as the presentation of Nikolay Luchenkov from Russia on chemsex in EECA.

Also, I received answers to many questions on migration that I’m interested in, and most importantly, exchanged contacts with almost all the participants. It is well known that nowadays there is a very large stream of migrants from Tajikistan to Russia, and many of them lack information about services for migrants and d existing organizations in Russia. Now our organization will be able to refer our clients to these organizations, and we won’t lose them out of sight.

If you are interested in specific presentations of the Autumn School, please send your request to autumnschool@AFEW.nl.

Support. Do not punish!

In June 2019, dozens of cities in the EECA region hosted the campaign «Support. Do not punish». Activists took to the streets to publicly protest against repressive drug policies.

This action, which is held annually all over the world, is a great chance to once again draw attention to this unresolved problem. How it was in the EECA region in 2019 you can read here.

Plans for 2020

Are you part of a collective, network or organisation advocating for drug policies that prioritise health and human rights? Are you planning to join the 2020 Support. Don’t Punish Global Day of Action and have an outstanding plan to build momentum? If your answer is “yes” then this call for applications might be for you!

Through this call, the Support. Don’t Punish campaign aims to identify and support local partners (up to 7) with funding of between USD 2,000 – 4,000 for strategic, creative and collaborative projects building up to the 2020 Global Day of Action that advance drug policy reform, bolster harm reduction and build bridges with/within/between communities disproportionately affected by the “war on drugs” (e.g. people who use drugs, farmers of crops deemed illicit, youth, ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, among many others).

You can apply for the grant here.

What is “Support. Do not punish”?

Support. Don’t Punish is a global grassroots-centred initiative in support of harm reduction and drug policies that prioritise public health and human rights. The campaign seeks to put harm reduction on the political agenda by strengthening the mobilisation capacity of affected communities and their allies, opening dialogue with policy makers, and raising awareness among the media and the public.

The campaign’s yearly high point is the Global Day of Action, which takes place on, or around, 26th June (the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking). Historically, this date has been used by governments to showcase their drug control “achievements” in coercive terms. The campaign’s Global Day of Action seeks to reclaim and shift that day’s narrative. And so, every year, an increasing number of  activists in dozens of cities all over the world join this unique and multifaceted show of force for reform and harm reduction.

The Support. Don’t Punish campaign aligns with the following key messages

  • The drug control system is broken and in need of reform
  • People who use drugs should no longer be criminalised
  • People involved in the drug trade at low levels, especially those involved for reasons of subsistence or coercion, should not face harsh or disproportionate punishments
  • The death penalty should never be imposed for drug offences
  • Drug policy should focus on health, well-being and harm reduction
  • Drug policy budgets need rebalancing to ensure health and harm reduction-based responses are adequately financed.

 

Mariias Frolova: “The Most Important Thing is Working Together”

Author: Olya Kulyk, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine)

Last year, AFEW-Ukraine gathered young activists of the project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations” from four cities of Ukraine in a Summer Camp. One of the goals was to teach teenagers to design projects and prepare their own applications for funding. The projects created during the camp later were sent to AFEW-Ukraine’s competition of small grants.

18-year-old Mariias Frolova is a leader of the youth community centre “Compass” from the Community Organisation “Kharkiv charitable fund “Blago”. “Compass” is a centre for adolescents who use drugs. AFEW-Ukraine supports four of such centres in Ukraine. Mariias is telling about the projects of her team.

Mariias, please tell us why did you decide to create the projects for youth?

– I decided to develop projects for youth when I participated in the camp for project leaders of Bridging the Gaps project. After training, I thought that I could do something useful for myself or for other young people.

In “Compass” we often get together, play and discuss things. Our team got the idea of ​​watching films together and discussing them later. Initially, we wanted to choose educational films – about diseases, human rights and so on, so that we learn more. Then as a bonus, we added fiction films. We needed some extra equipment – a beamer, screen, and speakers.

AFEW-Ukraine supported the purchase of this equipment.

Our second project is called “QR code”. The project helps adolescents to learn more about their rights. One day our friend asked: “What would I do if I did not know about “Compass?” This made us think that not everyone knows about the centre and how cool it is, as this is the place for the adolescents to get help. We needed to inform adolescents that they can come to “Compass” while facing different situations in their lives. Now QR codes are popular. Through scanning them, you can get access to different information, so we decided to use them for informing youth about their rights and inviting them to the centre.

Who is the target audience for your projects and how do you inform about them?

– We locate our QR codes in schools and lyceums of Kharkiv. By scanning the QR code (there are six of them), adolescents are directed to the information about “Compass”, information about HIV, reproductive health, psychoactive substances and police. After reading the information, teenagers are offered to answer online questions on these topics. After passing the quest with six different topics and completing the task, participants receive an invitation to “Compass” and get a ticket to our cinema.

 Target group of the projects is youth of 14-19 years old, usually from not very rich families, often having limited access to leisure activities. Therefore, free movie screening is very attractive for them.

What are your achievements in projects implementations?

– Since October, we had 13 film screenings with 105 participants, followed by interesting in-depth discussions. 

Due to QR codes project, more people began to visit “Compass”. 64 people received invitations to come to the centre and the cinema. Some visitors to our cinema stay here for services… Since November last year, we received more than 260 answers to our online questionnaires.

QR codes and movie screening stimulate youth to learn more about HIV, drug use, reproductive health issues. Those who come to watch the movie, are also involved in discussions about safer behaviours. Social workers from the centre are invited for facilitating discussions and can immediately respond to any question or provide individual or group counselling if needed.

How did you benefit from creating and implementing projects?

– It was a great experience. After the projects I mentioned above, we developed a new one, submitted it to one big organization and won a grant that will allow us to have a gym in our centre.

I am confident that the most important thing is to work together. We can have different opinions, which can sometimes create problems, but instead of arguing we have to decide on everything together.

Olena Voskresenska: “2018 Was Very Active and Diverse for AFEW-Ukraine”

Author: Olya Kulyk, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine)

The executive director of International Charitable Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine) Olena Voskresenska is telling about the main achievements of organisation in 2018 and its plans for 2019.

– Olena, how was the year of 2018 for AFEW-Ukraine?

– 2018 was a very active and diverse year for AFEW-Ukraine. During the last year we strengthened and expanded our work on empowering key communities, developing community leaders and facilitating the dialogue between the communities. In our work with adolescents who use drugs within the project “Bridging the gaps: health and rights for key populations”, the special focus was on developing youth leaders. In 2018, young activists from four regions of Ukraine had a chance to develop their own projects, and small grants that we provided to them allowed young people to implement youth-led projects in their regions. Through the Country Key Populations Platform, that we continue to support, we had an opportunity to learn more about the needs of different key populations – people who use drugs, sex workers, LGBT, and ex-prisoners. We also help the communities to develop communication algorithms to ensure that the voices from the most remote areas of the country are heard by the community leaders.

Besides, at the end of the year, we started the project aimed at empowering HIV-positive women in Kyiv and Cherkassy as advocates for their rights. The project was supported by the Embassy of Norway – a new donor for our organization.

– What were the three main achievements over the past year that you can determine?

– Since 2011, AFEW-Ukraine has been working with adolescents who use drugs, and I am very proud that in 2018 we managed to expand this work to small cities and rural areas of Ukraine. It was possible thanks to the project “Underage, overlooked: Improving access to Integrated HIV Services for Adolescents Most at Risk in Ukraine” that is supported by Expertise France – Initiative 5%. The project is implemented in cooperation with Alliance of Public Health, and now services for adolescents who use drugs are developed in 28 small cities of seven regions of Ukraine. Initial project research, that is now being finalized, is the first of its kind not only in Ukraine but probably in most of the countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA).

In 2018, AFEW-Ukraine supported the development of standards on rehabilitation for the Ministry of Social Policy. I am very proud that we managed to bring together a good team of experts for working on the standards, including a representative of the community of people who use drugs. We hope that these standards will help to improve the quality of rehabilitation services in the country, based on the best international practices, human rights approach and needs of the community. We are very much looking forward to further work in this direction not only in Ukraine but also in Georgia.

2018 was also a very important year for all HIV service organisations, as it was the year of the 22nd International AIDS Conference that took place in the Netherlands. Being a part of AFEW Network, with AFEW International Secretariat in Amsterdam, we worked hard to ensure maximum involvement of EECA participants in the conference and attracting attention to our region. I am very happy that we managed to support a large delegation of AFEW-Ukraine partners, including young activist from Kropyvnytskyi, representatives of the community of people who use drugs, and HIV-positive women from Ukraine.

– What are the plans of the Foundation for 2019?

– In 2019 we will continue working with young people in Ukraine, focusing on their active involvement in decision-making processes, including monitoring of the local budgets. I hope that we will be able to expand our work to include young detainees in our projects.

Developing harm reduction friendly rehabilitation remains a priority for us, and we will stimulate the changes in current rehabilitation practices in Ukraine and Georgia with our local partners. Also, we are very much looking forward to closer working with HIV-positive women in Ukraine, disseminating the successful model of immediate intervention that was already tested in Kyiv, to Cherkasy, and potentially other regions of the country. In 2019 we are also planning to revise our strategic plan, which will define the priorities of AFEW-Ukraine’s work for the upcoming several years.

Why Ukrainian Key Communities Unite in One Platform

Author: AFEW-Ukraine

In many countries, different key populations unite. They do it for the better representation of their interests in the development of public policy. This is often the alliance within one community, and less frequently – of several communities.

Four key populations in Ukraine – ex-prisoners, LGBT, people who use drugs (PUDs), sex workers (SW) – have their own self-organizations, being at different stages of development. There are communities with great experience in advocacy and work with international donors, but there are those that are at the initial stage of development. They grow stronger with the support from more experienced activists.

“Despite growing importance of the community voice in decision-making processes related to access to health and social services, very often representatives of HIV-service organisations speak on behalf of key populations rather than community representatives. Having the voices of community directly heard leads to a situation where the actual needs of key communities are much better taken into account in programs planning and implementation”, says Olena Voskresenska, executive director of ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine).

In October 2015, during the meeting held within the framework of Tripartite cooperation between the Kingdom of the Netherlands, UNAIDS and civil society, community activists expressed the idea of creating a Platform. This Platform had to become an independent structure for sharing experience, dialogue and developing a common position and advocacy messages of several communities, as well as facilitating representation of communities in public bodies, working groups and other organizations. In addition, the Platform could contribute to collecting data on the needs of communities and raising new activists.

“My idea was to give communities the opportunity to advocate for their rights and change policies and to bring communities together to help each other. Also, it was important to allow communities to develop and mobilize themselves without external influence,” recalls Petro Polyantsev, a member of CKPP steering committee.

Creating the Platform

Initially, it was necessary to understand whether all key communities are interested in the Platform. Then the priorities of the Platform had to be identified. In 2016, the most active representatives of the LGBT, SW and PUD communities formed an initiative working group. Participants of the Tripartite cooperation initiative – UNAIDS, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine) and LGBT Association “LIGA” (partners in the project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and rights for key populations”) – helped to organise group’s work and found the necessary funding for the Organizational Forum of the Country Key Populations Platform (CKPP).

“Today the priority for communities is to maintain access to services in the context of transition to state funding. By working together, communities can achieve much better results than by working just by themselves,” says Andrii Chernyshev, a member of CKPP steering committee.

The first CKPP Forum was held in January 2017. The main result of this event was a decision to establish the Country Platform as an association of key communities’ representatives. During the Forum, also representatives of the community of ex-prisoners joined the Platform.

CKPP was officially registered as a public association in December 2017. The Steering committee, representing all four communities, coordinates the work of the Platform. The main strategic issues are resolved during the CKPP Forums. Funding for Platform activities is provided through the selection of several grant programs managed by the organizations endorsed by the Steering Committee and an Advisory Group. As of today , the work of the Platform has been financially supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands in the framework of the project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and rights for key populations”, UNAIDS, Eurasian Harm Reduction Association (EHRA), International Renaissance Foundation, the Embassy of the Netherlands in Ukraine. Such diverse funding model allows the Platform to remain independent and unbiased.

First steps are successful

The activities of the Platform in the last two years were mainly focused on the development of its structure, as well as the strengthening of the communities. During this period, 163 activists from 18 regions of Ukraine took part in important and interesting events and trainings, the topics of which were determined by the participants. Communities’ members developed CKPP Regulation and the CKPP Code of Ethics which regulates the basic principles of work.

In 2018, members of the Platform presented it at the XI National LGBT Conference in Ukraine and the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in the Netherlands.

“I believe in the Country Key Populations Platform. We are already seeing the results. The government is more inclined to listen to us because we gained legitimacy by joining our forces. When people are motivated to make change happen and work together, human rights will be a reality in our country, and not just words. Only together we can save our lives,” says Vielta Parkhomenko, a member of CKPP steering committee.

The researcher Anastasia Bezverkha in the recent study “Country Key Populations Platform – from better communication to stronger voice. The case study from Ukraine” highlighted the positive changes influenced by the creation and work of the Platform.

“CKPP impacted the communication between the partners in the field in a positive way. Key population leaders became more visible and new leaders emerged. In addition, CKPP serves as an important space for communication of national decision-makers with key population leaders,” summarizes Anastasia.

The IV CKPP Forum, which was held in December 2018, was focused on developing the strategies and work plans of the Platform for 2019.

Under 16 and Above: Protecting the Rights of Adolescents and Preventing HIV

Author: Yana Kazmirenko, Ukraine

Shortage of HIV prevention programmes for young people was one of the key topics discussed at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018). At the conference, AFEW-Ukraine presented its best practices in HIV response among young people. Since 2012, it has been supporting the initiatives aimed at most-at-risk adolescents within the Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations project funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Gaps analysis

Over the course of project implementation, social welfare centres for adolescents who use psychoactive substances were established in Kharkiv, Poltava, Kropyvnytskyi and Chernivtsi and a rehabilitation day care centre for such young people was opened in Chernivtsi. In 2017 only, over 12 hundred adolescents received 21,290 services in those four cities.

Olena Voskresenska, Director of AFEW-Ukraine, recalls that when the project just started, a gap analysis was conducted. It turned out that there were a lot of programmes for adults who use drugs, while few donors were supporting similar activities for adolescents. It was considered that this population does not make a considerable contribution to the HIV epidemic. Thus, both most-at-risk adolescents and generally schoolchildren and students of vocational training centres remained out of focus.

“Of all the countries involved in Bridging the Gaps project, Ukraine is unique in terms of the activities implemented for under-age drug users. We work with non-injecting drug users trying to prevent them from switching to injecting drugs,” says Olena.

Children do not use drugs

One of the main achievements of AFEW-Ukraine is developing a tool to monitor the violations of human rights of most-at-risk adolescents. Questionnaires are used to collect data on adolescents’ rights violations, providing urgent response and legal support. Iryna Nerubaieva, AFEW-Ukraine Project Manager, thinks that in the Ukrainian society there is a strong belief: children cannot use drugs and they do not use them.

“This community is invisible and unheard. Most often, adolescents do not know about their rights, do not know that they have any rights or how these rights are to be protected,” says Iryna.

Adolescents – mostly high schoolers and students of vocational training centres – are brought to the community centres by their friends. Often they are referred by social welfare institutions, departments of juvenile services and even police.

Currently, AFEW-Ukraine works in four cities of Ukraine: Kharkiv, Chernivtsi, Kropyvnytskyi and Poltava. Besides, thanks to the cooperation with Alliance for Public Health, since 2017 the activities for adolescents, including monitoring of human rights violations, have been conducted in five more cities of Ukraine.

Testing as a prevention tool

At the conference, Yevheniia Kuvshynova, Executive Director of Convictus Ukraine, implementing partner of AFEW-Ukraine and Alliance for Public Health, told about the Voice of Adolescents project, which covers 717 adolescents.

The Underage, Overlooked: Improving Access to Integrated HIV Services for Adolescents Most at Risk in Ukraine project is aimed at teenagers who use drugs and live in small towns and villages in seven regions of Ukraine. Adolescents from Kyiv attend the Street Power youth club. In this club, teenagers who use psychoactive substances and practice risky injecting and sexual behaviours can watch films, play computer games and receive social support.

According to Yevheniia, most of them use non-injecting drugs and HIV testing for them is rather a prevention tool. So far, no HIV cases have been detected. Adolescents are tested for hepatitis C and B as well as sexually transmitted infections.

For many years, Convictus has been working with adults who inject drugs providing services to 11 thousand people. Working with adolescents is different: they are tested only starting from 14 years of age, with a social worker and a doctor involved.

“One of our priorities is building a network and a map of services, so that adolescents could go to any organization of the network and receive services from our partners. If a person coming to us needs more in-depth support, we provide such support and also help him or her with clothes as we maintain a clothing bank,” tells Yevheniia.

Convictus is planning to develop a School of Leadership and a sexual health programme for girls, which are to close more gaps in the system of HIV prevention among most-at-risk adolescents in Ukraine.

‘Bridging the Gaps’ through the eyes of teenagers

In 2011-2017, over eight thousand clients received 70,232 medical, psychological, social and legal services within ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ project in Ukraine. Halyna, Artem and Carl (names changed) were also clients of ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ project.

Resolving problems with the family

Halyna is 19 years old. She is a slim girl with beautiful eyes and a charming smile. Halyna was born in a small Ukrainian town bordering with Moldova. She has been living with a man she loves for a year. A month ago, they got married.

However, just two years ago, Halyna’s life was neither easy nor happy. Back then, she lived with her mother and stepfather and was a constant victim of abuse. Halyna’s stepfather did not want the girl to live with them, so was turning his wife against her own daughter. Halyna, who was still a minor, had to leave her home, find a job and make her own living. The girl started using drugs – first marijuana, then amphetamine, sometimes ecstasy or LSD. It lasted for a few months.

Once, when the girl told her mother everything. Talking about that period of her life, Halyna cannot hold her tears back.

“When I came back home, I was not quite adequate and had hysterics. Once, my stepfather called police and they took me away. They sent me to a juvenile shelter in Chernivtsi. I spent two months there. At first, it was difficult, and I wanted out of there as soon as possible, but when I went back home to my family, it was even worse. My stepfather abused me and made my mother do the same,” tells the girl.

The psychologist working in the shelter referred Halyna to the Dialogue Centre of Social and Psychological Support (New Family Foundation), implementing ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ project. Three times a week, Halyna attended counselling sessions with a psychologist and a social worker there. Besides, the girl, her mother and stepfather took part in family group conferences. The approach of family group conferences stipulates that a child may not be viewed separately from the family, so family members should be involved in solving child’s problems. Halyna says that it helped to maintain relations in her family for a while.

“Later, as my legal age was approaching, my mother and stepfather said that they did not want me to live with them. Our problems resumed, and I went back to drugs. After I turned 18, I had to move out,” tells the girl.

Despite the challenges, Halyna continued coming to the Centre for support and soon was able to quit drugs. She attended the Centre for about eight months. The girl says that for her, the Centre was a safe place and people working there helped her a lot. Halyna thinks that it is quite possible that if not for this support, she would still be using drugs.

Coming home for Mom’s birthday

Artem from Kropyvnytskyi is 22. He lives with his family – his parents, sister and grandmother. The young man says that he likes mountains, nature, rock-climbing and drugs.

When Artem was a teenager, he started taking alcohol, smoking cigarettes and then tried drugs for the first time. He confesses that he was not happy with his life and wanted to escape the reality, so he started “systematically” using drugs. Crystal meth, LSD, ecstasy and so on – he used everything except injecting drugs. It lasted for over four years.

Then his family intervened. Artem’s uncle suggested he should visit a psychologist from Lilia social bureau (NGO Return to Life). Psychologist’s counselling, awareness-raising classes, school of volunteers – all those things became part of the young man’s life.

However, just in several months he went back to drugs and had to start everything from scratch. Later, Artem spent three months in the rehabilitation centre run by the Return to Life NGO. He came back home last autumn, on his mother’s birthday.

“If it were not for this project and the social bureau, I would probably still be an active drug user. Maybe I would even end up in jail,” says Artem.

He became an active volunteer of the organization. Campaigns, workshops, summer school, working on his own project – all those things interest him and are an important part of his life. He has no desire to go back to drugs.

Drugs bring an illusion of the solution

Nineteen-year-old Carl is a second-year psychology student from the western region of Ukraine. He has parents and an older sister. Carl enjoys learning new things and likes history, especially military history. A year ago, he experienced some problems and his friends offered him a “way out” – together with them, he started using drugs.

“At first, I liked it, it felt exciting. Then I realized that drugs only bring me new problems. I grew addicted to drugs, could not communicate with people in a normal way, it interfered with my studies. When I understood that it all turns out to be a problem, I came to the Centre,” says Carl.

He heard about the Dialogue Centre a year and a half ago. Project workers regularly come to student dormitories and tell young people about HIV, drugs, safe sex, test them for HIV and hepatitis, distribute condoms.

“I lost many friends and acquaintances. Sometimes even my fellow students rejected me and called me a drug addict. I am a human, so when the society turns its back on me, it is very painful,” he recalls.

In the Centre, there was a psychologist who worked with Carl for six months. Embarrassed, Carl tells that he opened up during those counselling sessions and even cried. He says that the psychologist helped him to keep his life from going to pieces. Besides, in the Centre he could eat a meal and spend his leisure time.

“I know for sure what would happen to me if not for this Centre and this project. There was a friend of mine in the dormitory, who had a “point of no return”: he switched to hard injecting drugs, was kicked out of the dormitory and then – out of the university. It is quite probable that it would be the same with me,” says Carl.

The problems, which led the young man to drug use, are still there, but he realized that drugs do not resolve them, only bringing an illusion of solution. He is sure that every person should understand it.

About the project

‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ is an international project, which was launched in Ukraine in 2011 and is aimed at protecting the human rights of drug users by changing social attitudes and government policies and improving the services they can access. The main activities are aimed at under-age drug users. Four partner organizations provide services to adolescents in four cities: Return to Life CF in Kropyvnytskyi, Public Health PRCF in Poltava, Blago CF in Kharkiv and New Family CF in Chernivtsi.

In Chernivtsi, there is a rehabilitation centre, while in other cities the services are provided through social bureaus and day care centres. The efforts are aimed at reducing the risks of drug use, re-establishing social connections and finding resources in the lives of adolescents to support them. The most important task for project workers is to make adolescents understand that in the centres they will be welcomed and will not be judged because of their drug habits.

AIDS 2018: Engaging Young People who use Drugs in the HIV and Human Rights Response in Ukraine

Source: www.aids2018.org

Ukraine presented its experience in engaging young people who use drugs in the HIV and human rights response during International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 in Amsterdam. Organisations ACO “Convictus Ukraine”, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine), CF “Return to Life” and CF “KCF “Blago” shared the results of their work.

Club for teenagers

The main purpose of the activity in the framework of the PITCH project is to prevent the spread of HIV and other dangerous diseases among vulnerable adolescents and to develop healthy lifestyle habits, the director of “Convictus Ukraine” Yevheniia Kuvshynova is saying.

In their work, “Convictus” team is actively using mobile clinic where they provide services for teenagers. A multidisciplinary team is operating on the basis of a mobile clinic. The mobile clinic helps them to bring the services to those who are not covered with prevention and treatment programs. There is also a school of leaders and a Street power youth club, where teenagers can spend their leisure time and receive help from psychologist or social workers, get information, medical services, testing, etc. Around 500 teenagers received services in the club.

Accepted the monitoring tool

Iryna Nerubaieva

The project manager of the ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine) Iryna Nerubaieva shared the results of the piloting of the tool for monitoring the violations of human rights of most-at-risk adolescents which was developed and implemented in the framework of the project Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations. From January till December 2017 in four pilot cities, 792 interviews with adolescents and youth aged 14-21 were conducted. 430 adolescents were 14-18 years old. The number of cases of human rights violations registered in an online form was 92 of all surveyed. A young activist of the CF “Return to Life” Daria Kopyevska, a social worker of the CF “KCF “Blago”Alina Khokhlova and a lawyer and AFEW-Ukraine’s consultant Vita Musatenko also shared their experience.

“It is good to see that teenagers realized why they need this tool, and how social workers accepted it. Now they know how that it will help in their work,” Vita Musatenko is saying.

According to the latest estimates, the number of most-at-risk adolescents is 129 000, including 21 700 injection drug users. However, there is no official data on the exact number of most-at-risk adolescents, including underage drug users. In Ukraine, most-at-risk adolescents represent a very closed group, thus the lack of statistical data, stigma, discrimination and legal barriers make their access to HIV/STI services more complicated.

 

Are the Rights of Most-at-Risk Adolescents in Ukraine Violated

Traditionally, there is an understanding that human right defenders organize actions, protest by the parliament, or we think of them as of those having legal education and regularly going to courts. However, every person can be a human right defender. Each specialist who provides services to vulnerable groups is, in fact, a human rights defender.

Reasons for implementing the monitoring tool

Within the last years, Ukraine has achieved great successes in fighting HIV epidemics. However, there are still many gaps that require immediate attention. First of all, there is a gap in providing prevention and treatment services for most at risk adolescents and youth, especially those who used drugs.

Starting from 2012, International Charitable Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEWUkraine) has been supporting the establishment of the system of services for adolescents using drugs. This work is conducted within the framework of the Bridging the Gaps project. Social bureaus, rehabilitation center and daycare centers in four cities were opened and are functioning successfully. Only in 2017, these centers and bureaus provided 21,290 services to 1,215 adolescents.

Project experience demonstrates that the rights of underage drug users are often violated, and this fact remains unknown to anyone from their close environment. Lack of response leads to repeated cases of violations, thus creating barriers in getting timely assistance, and, as a result, increases the possibility of negative consequences of drug use and unsafe behaviours. Therefore, violation of rights of underage drug users, that remains unnoticed is among the factors that contribute to increased risks of HIV infection.

Despite frequent cases of violations reported by service providers, these cases are not officially registered and publicly unknown.

That is why in 2016 AFEW-Ukraine and its partners started developing a tool for monitoring human rights violations of adolescents using drugs. The tool can be also applied to any other category of MARA, and it can be used by any specialist who works with MARA and has basic knowledge about human rights.

The overall objective of its implementation was to collect the data about cases of violations so that services providers and stakeholders could understand the scope of the problem and, based on that, improve and adjust advocacy actions on the national and local levels. Besides, use of the tool could help to provide timely response to the violations of rights of each client, offering an algorithm of actions that can facilitate it. This instrument can be used by a wide range of organizations and specialists that work with vulnerable children, adolescents and youth.

“Our task was to demonstrate that a social worker or any other professional working with key populations can stand for the rights of their clients. That it, in fact, does not require special legal education nor being a part of job description. However, specialists often do not understand that the problems faced by their clients are in fact cases of human rights violations that need special attention,” comments Anastasiya Shebardina, senior project manager from AFEW-Ukraine.

Piloting the monitoring tool

The tool for monitoring the violations of human rights of MARA consists of the directions on the use of the tool, screening questionnaire for service providers to identify the cases of violation, a template for the legal claim and online form for registering the cases of human rights violations that are filled by social workers or other specialists. The forms are filled online on the website of AFEW-Ukraine.

In each project city, AFEW-Ukraine organized introductory trainings for over 100 specialists from partner NGOs and service providers from referral network. Also, an educational webinar was organized for a wider range of participants who wished to learn more about the monitoring tool. In the nearest future, a free online course on human rights monitoring for most-at-risk youth will be developed.

Results of monitoring tool piloting

In 2017, 792 interviews with adolescents and youth were conducted with the use of screening questionnaire in 4 pilot cities. Among them, 430 adolescents were 14-18 years old. A number of cases of human rights violations, registered in an online form was 92 (12%) of all surveyed.

The results of piloting the tool demonstrate that the format for monitoring and documenting cases of human rights violations helps service providers to better recognize them and provide timely response to violations. The analysis of the documented cases allows to identify typical situations for each separate region or city and make advocacy actions more effective.

Documentation and analysis of cases with the use of monitoring tool will be continued and be used for further advocacy.