Science for action on HIV, TB, and viral hepatitis in EECA

On November 18-19, with the support of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the first scientific workshop EECA INTERACT 2019 on HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) was held in Almaty.

The international event was organized by the Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD), the Kazakh Scientific Center for Dermatology and Infectious Diseases of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan, non-profit organizations AFEW Kazakhstan and AFEW International.

For two days, more than 100 researchers, representatives of communities and clinicians from Kazakhstan, Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Georgia and other countries shared their experiences, the latest scientific developments in the field of treatment of HIV, tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis in order to strengthen the scientific base and improve the situation in the region.

“AFEW has been working in the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region for about 20 years and constantly experiences a lack of data on the HIV, TB and viral hepatitis epidemics in the region, – says Anke van Dam, member of the international organizing committee of EECA INTERACT 2019; executive director of AFEW International. These data are needed to develop evidence-based policies and interventions. Through EECA INTERACT, AFEW strives to stimulate and facilitate research in the region. Also our goal is to foster new research interactions among leading investigators and those who represent the potential future scientific leadership for health care and research in the region and to build research and clinical capacity across EECA”.

EECA is the only region in the world where the HIV epidemic is still growing rapidly. UNAIDS estimates that as of 2018, about 1.7 million people in the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region are living with HIV. About 38,000 people died from AIDS in 2018.

Significant barriers to prevention and treatment services remain for people living with and affected by HIV, TB, and hepatitis across the region. For example, although the HIV epidemic in EECA is concentrated predominantly among key populations, particularly among people who inject drugs, coverage of harm-reduction and other prevention programs is insufficient to reduce new infections. The region urgently needs more effective strategies of prevention, treatment, and care and support that are tailored to the particular circumstances of individual countries.

“I hope EECA INTERACT will become an effective forum for discussion, the issues raised at scientific discussions, the exchange of experience, will allow us to put the necessary emphasis on the near and long-term prospects, and familiarize a wide circle of participants with new methods, developments and approaches on these issues. The abstracts will be appreciated, feedback will be established, the scientific community and the geography of further cooperation and investment will expand. This activity is necessary to achieve UNAIDS goals 90-90-90”, says Bauyrzhan Bayserkin, head of the local committee of the EECA INTERACT 2019 workshop; Doctor of Medical Sciences; Director of the Kazakh Scientific Center of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

EECA INTERACT 2019 took an innovative approach by bringing together experts in HIV, TB, and hepatitis to participate in the International Conference Committee developing the scientific program.

It included experts in the field of HIV, TB and hepatitis from around the world, including Michel Kazatchkine, UNAIDS Special Advisor on HIV, TB and Hepatitis in the EECA region; Catherine Hankins, professor, Deputy Director, Science at AIGHD, co-chair of the annual INTEREST conference; Alexey Alexandrov, head physician of the Minsk Regional Clinical Center “Psychiatry-Narcology”; Sergey Dvoryak, founder and senior scientist, UIPHP, professor at the department of social work, and many others.

EECA INTERACT will be an annual event and will be held in different countries of the EECA region to enable scientists from all countries to demonstrate their discoveries.

See more pictures here.

 

 

 

Good practices of intersectoral collaboration for HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis

The WHO Regional Office for Europe is collecting examples of good practices of intersectoral collaboration for HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis for publication in a dedicated compendium.

This compendium will include examples of actions undertaken by sectors outside the health sector, possibly (but not necessarily) in collaboration with the health sector. The practices should be aimed at improving the outcomes or the determinants of the HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis epidemics, as encouraged by the UN Common Position on ending HIV, TB and viral hepatitis through intersectoral collaboration. They should also be accompanied by impact evaluations and credible monitoring mechanisms or research.

The above-mentioned UN Common Position was developed with an inclusive and consultative process to identify shared principles and key actionable areas within and beyond the health sector to address HIV, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis in Europe and central Asia. It was successfully launched at a side event to the UNGA in New York in November 2018 and subsequently distributed within UN system to all UN Resident Coordinators of the region.

The good practices must be submitted in either English or Russian using the form provided below. All submissions will be reviewed by the WHO Regional Office for Europe against the following criteria: relevance, sustainability, efficiency and ethical appropriateness. The authorship of each good practice will be highlighted in the compendium, which is expected to be published in 2020.

The deadline for submission is 18 November 2019. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact daram@who.int. 

The Coordination Committee called on the Global Fund to support the fight against HIV epidemic in Russia

The Coordination Committee for the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS in Russian Federation, responsible for oversight and coordination of the implementation of the Global Fund grants in Russia, called on the Global Fund to allocate funding to support civil society organizations in their fight against HIV epidemic in Russia for the next three years.

2019 is the year of the replenishment for the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) and by the end of this year, based on the results of the replenishment, the Global Fund will make a decision on the allocations for the eligible countries to address HIV, TB and Malaria for the next 3-year period.

According to the 2019 Global Fund Eligibility List, the Russian Federation has met the requirement of two consecutive years of eligibility based on income classification and disease burden and is now eligible to receive an allocation of funding to support the HIV/AIDS response for the next 3 years. Since the Russian Federation is not on the OECD-DAC List of ODA recipients, according to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, the Russian Federation may only be eligible for an allocation to support the HIV response efforts by non-governmental or civil society organizations and only if the country demonstrates barriers to providing funding for interventions for key populations, as supported by the country’s epidemiology.

According to the Global Fund’s Eligibility Policy, “the eligibility for funding under this provision will be assessed by the Secretariat as part of the decision-making process for allocations. As part of its assessment, the Secretariat, in consultation with UN and other partners as appropriate, will look at the overall human rights environment of the context with respect to key populations, and specifically whether there are laws or policies which influence practices and seriously limit and/or restrict the provision of evidence-informed interventions for such populations.”

It is a well-known fact that Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) is the only region in the world where the HIV epidemic continues to grow , and Russia has been considered as the “driving force” of this regional growth. According to the UNAIDS 2018 Global AIDS Update, “the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia has grown by 30% since 2010, reflecting insufficient political commitment and domestic investment in national AIDS responses across much of the region. Regional trends depend a great deal on progress in the Russian Federation, which is home to 70% of people living with HIV in the region. Outside of the Russian Federation, the rate of new HIV infections is stable.