How Kyiv Fights the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

Author: Yana Kazmirenko, Ukraine

The adoption of the Fast-Track Cities strategy resulted in launching of the HIV express-testing in all outpatient clinics in Ukraine’s capital. The strategy also allowed to increase the number of people who receive antiretroviral therapy.

The struggle against HIV/AIDS epidemic in Kyiv strengthened since the mayor Vitaliy Klitschko, signed the declaration in Paris. Apart from that, Kyiv was included into the Fast-Track Cities programme in April 2016 as a measure to fight AIDS. According to this programme, 90% of the citizens in 2020 should know about the disease, 90% of the infected ones should be getting treatment, and the treatment should be effective for 90% of the patients.

In the latest United Nations agency report on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and UN-Habitat as of 2015, the Ukraine’s capital entered the list of 27 most HIV/AIDS infected cities in the world. Alexander Yurchenko, the head physician at Kyiv AIDS centre, hopes that Kyiv will not be included into the newest rating. The programme has seen first success. 800 medical workers were trained, and every outpatient clinic in Kyiv received express-tests. The result of the test is available in as little as 20 minutes. There were 2,500 more individuals (compared with the previous year) who had tested their blood in a year.

A record amount of 555 people was included into the dispensary registration with the help of express-testing only over the first quarter of 2017. To compare: only 1300 people were registered in 2016, according to Yurchenko.

In his opinion, the situation in Ukraine’s capital with a population of three million people has improved. There were only around 5,000 people getting treatment in 2012, and now there are more than 7,000. It is planned to give treatment to 12,000 people by the end of the year.

Migrants and HIV

Yurchenko attributes Kyiv’s high position in the world ratings of HIV spread due to its attractiveness for migrants. 400,000 people come to work in the capital daily.

“Men who have sex with men (MSM) also tend to come to Kyiv, as it is hard for them to even live in such regional centre as Cherkassy. They attract a lot of attention in smaller cities. In the capital, they can find work, hide themselves, and find partners,” continues the interviewee.

The prevailing factor of HIV spread in Kyiv in 2012 was an injecting way of transmission. Now the predominant way has shifted to sexual transmission.

For instance, the story of the oldest patient in the capital of Ukraine. The man admitted that his wife was refusing sexual intercourse with him and he had to use the services of sex workers.

“Doctor, now I know what I will die from,” the old patient said jokingly, after he heard his diagnosis.

“According to statistics, you will die from cardiac ischemia, but we will control and monitor your HIV,” Yurchenko remembers his dialogue with the patient.

Surviving thanks to the Foundations

Kyiv’s mayor Vitaliy Klitschko stressed that one of the main responsibilities that Kyiv took within the framework of the Fast-Track Cities programme is the provision of sufficient amount of antiretroviral medicines for treatment of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.

There would be significant progress in the implementation of the Fast-Track strategy if the government did not delay the supplies of medicines for antiretroviral therapy. This leads to patients receiving one month course of treatment instead of six or three months’ courses.

The variety of options in treatment schemes (around 38 of them) does not yet allow to pass the dispensing of medicines to the family doctors’ level. Yurchenko promised that there will be two or three variants of treatment made, and they will be passed on to the outpatient clinics as soon as the government supplies of medicines are in full scope.

Now patients literally survive at the expense of international and private foundations. On July 11, Kyiv has become the first Eastern European city where HIV-positive patients received dolutegravir (sixth generation medicine for antiretroviral therapy) at the expense of the Elena Pinchuk ANTI AIDS Foundation. The yearly course of medications will cost $170. This allows to increase the number of people who will receive the life-saving treatment in as early as 2018 at no additional cost.

The adoption of the law on mandatory HIV testing* can also bring the capital closer to the standards implemented by Fast-Track Cities. Alexander Yurchenko says that this law might be enacted by the end of the year.

As estimated by the experts, the number of HIV/AIDS infected people in the capital is 23,000 inhabitants. This is the tenth of the estimated figures in Ukraine – 250,000. There were 304,914 officially registered new cases of HIV infection in Ukraine since 1987. Since that time, there were 42,987 deaths from AIDS. The regions most affected with HIV infection, apart from Kyiv, are Dnipropetrovsk, Kyiv, Donetsk, Mykolayiv and Odesa regions.

*AFEW International is not aware of the law on mandatory HIV testing and will advocate against such law.

One in Sixth People Infected with HIV in Tajikistan This Year is a Migrant

Author: Nargis Hamrabayeva, Tajikistan

Approximately five thousand citizens of Tajikistan, which were found to be infected with HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis during their stay in the territory of the Russian Federation, were declared personae non gratae for lifetime by the government of Russia in June this year. How could this expulsion of infected fellow citizens affect the Republic of Tajikistan?

Generally, after returning from Russia, migrant workers, unaware of their status, may unintentionally put the health of the members of their families at risk by spreading and transmitting infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS, believes Takhmina Khaidarova, the head of the Tajik Network of Women (TNW) Living with HIV/AIDS.

“The consequences of transmitting and spreading of infectious diseases depend solely on the will of the state. Providing that a state fully implements their commitments within the framework of the National Strategy for the Response to HIV/AIDS Epidemic for 2017-2020, it would be possible to avoid drastic consequences. If the government of a state cannot conduct awareness-building work about infectious diseases and their transmission amongst their population on adequate level, despite the fact whether or not infected migrants would be deported, the increase of the epidemic will stay high,” she considers.

According to Takhmina Khaidarova, the main problem is the low level of awareness about infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, before the migrants leave the country, during their stay in the host country, as well as on their return to their home country. “Migrant workers have little information and preparation, they are not aware about their status before leaving the country and they do not observe any safety measures during their stay in labour migration. After contracting infectious diseases, they return to their home country and, generally, do not undergo medical examinations; so, unaware of this, they transmit infectious diseases to their sexual partners,” says Takhmina Khaidarova.

She believes that another problem lies in the fear of stigma and discrimination, therefore, migrant workers who have returned do not undergo examination until their health deteriorates considerably.

According to figures provided by the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Tajikistan, there have been noted 384 cases of citizens infected with HIV in the first quarter of 2017, whereby one in sixth is a migrant, who had left in search of work outside the country. Presently, the total number of people living with HIV-positive status in Tajikistan is around nine thousand.

It should also be reminded that Eastern Europe and Central Asia will be a prime focus in the 22nd International HIV/AIDS Conference in 2018, which will take place in Amsterdam in July 2018.

Central Asian NGOs Built a Network for Cross-Border Control of Tuberculosis

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

During the regional seminar-meeting held on 6-7 June in Almaty, Central Asian nongovernmental organizations established a network of partner organizations to address issues of labour migration and tuberculosis. The participants accepted draft Memorandum of cooperation between non-profit organizations to reduce the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis among migrant workers in the countries of the region.

“This document was created in response to the need of NGOs consolidation to educate migrant workers about TB symptoms and the opportunities of free treatment and diagnostics in the framework of the project, to promote treatment compliance, to exchange information and to disseminate best practices in the countries of Central Asian region,” says a project manager of the Global Fund, a representative of Project HOPE in the Republic of Kazakhstan Bakhtiyar Babamuratov.

The event was organized by the Project HOPE in the framework of the grant from Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Representatives of non-governmental organizations from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan attended the seminar .

Migrants do not want to be treated

From all the countries in the Central Asian region, Kazakhstan is accommodating the main stream of migrant workers from neighbouring countries. Migration flow continues to grow. Those who come to find a job often agree to any work, they often live in poor housing conditions and do not eat well. This results in tuberculosis development. In 2016, 753 external migrants addressed the organizations of primary health care and TB facilities of Kazakhstan and were tested for tuberculosis. In 2015, there were only 157 visits. Most migrant workers prefer not to attend medical institutions and refuse to be treated in the TB clinics or to be examined by a doctor. They consider it to be a wasting of working time, i.e. money. They have to support families left at home, therefore money is the main reason to come to a foreign country. For the same reason people do not want to spend money on health, even though a Comprehensive plan to combat tuberculosis in Kazakhstan for 2014-2020 involves activities to improve TB services for migrant workers.

Particularly alarming are the cases when a migrant worker is diagnosed with HIV/TB co-infection, and when such patient needs a serious treatment and social support. This important topic will be discussed in 2018 in the framework of the 22nd international AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – in Amsterdam. This conference will be very special as for AFEW International and the whole region where the organization works — Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Work at construction sites and markets

In the situation mentioned above, the participation of the NGOs in addressing of this issue has become very important. Outreach workers and volunteers – people, whom the target group trusts, – are searching for migrant workers on construction sites, at the farms, markets, in the restaurants or cafes. They tell migrants about the disease and the free treatment, convince to pass the examination and to provide social support. The results of such work are impressive.

“Within the project, implemented by Project HOPE in 2016, staff and volunteers of our public Fund helped 898 migrant workers to be tested for tuberculosis. For 25 of them the diagnosis was confirmed, and with our assistance people were able to receive free treatment. Besides, we provided migrant workers with motivational food packages. 8,312 labour migrants received information about the symptoms of tuberculosis, and now they know where to go if they are sick,” says the Director of the Public Fund Taldykorgan regional Foundation of employment promotion Svetlana Saduakasova.

These are the results of the activity of only one non-governmental organization in Kazakhstan. Nowadays, social activists are effectively working in eight regions of the country. Such results are possible to achieve only thanks to active collaboration with the non-governmental organizations from those countries where work migrants come from. The community members actively communicate with each other and exchange useful information to be aware of whether the diagnosed person came back to his home city, got registered in the TB clinic, continued to receive treatment, and so on. Only under these conditions we can achieve a complete recovery from TB for each individual and finally stop the growth of morbidity in the region.

Tatiana Vinogradova: «Only public organizations are able to work with vulnerable groups»

Tatiana Vinogradova

Author: Anastasiya Petrova, Russia

Last year a major event in the field of HIV in Russia became the adoption of the National strategies of counteraction with the spread of HIV-infection in the Russian Federation until 2020. One of the key objectives of the Strategy was the consolidation of efforts of governmental and nonprofit organizations in their fight against the epidemic. Today we discuss the implementation of this interaction in the most progressive city of Russia with the Deputy chief physician of St. Petersburg Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases, holder of Doctoral degree in Medicine, third-generation doctor Tatiana Vinogradova.

– Tatiana, do you support the idea of implementation of cross sectoral programs on HIV prevention among vulnerable groups in cooperation with socially oriented non-profit organizations?

– In addition to the scientific-organizational work in the AIDS Center, I am responsible for the interaction with public organizations in the context of HIV-infection in Saint-Petersburg. I think, this is very important. HIV is a socially sensitive disease, and groups of HIV vulnerable people – people who inject drugs, men who have sex with men, sex workers – usually are not easy to approach. I am deeply convinced that only nonprofit organizations, organizations that deal with this issue and have experience in the field, are able to work with the key groups. Even if we have an opportunity to send “a man in a white coat” to interact with these key groups, there is no guarantee that this health worker will be accepted and will be able to perform all the necessary tasks. Nonprofit organizations have access to these closed groups, they are able to work on the principle “peer to peer.” Representatives of vulnerable groups perceive them appropriately and they are able to provide medical assistance as well. This is the most important! We can find a lot of new HIV-cases by testing a large number of people, but when we test the general population or key populations, our work is not limited with testing and identifying, we also should provide medical support. Peer consultants and employees of nonprofit organizations are the best in this field.

– How does the Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases cooperate with NGOs? Is there any model or mechanisms?

– AIDS Center in St. Petersburg works with community organizations from the very first day of its existence. In the beginning, there was no AIDS Center in its modern sense, but there was an office based in Botkin hospital, which started this interaction. The first nonprofit organization was registered by Nikolay Panchenko. Therefore, we can say, that here in St.-Petersburg we already have thirty years of cooperation experience between public institutions and community organizations. We work together since the early 90’s.

Committee on health care through the Center for prevention and control of AIDS and infectious diseases provides financial support for the HIV prevention offices, which work in the city. Nowadays there are four such offices based on public medical institutions. These offices work in close cooperation with community organizations that employ peer consultants. Together with nonprofit organizations we conduct events, various events like testing days, for instance. Nonprofit organizations also hold round tables, press conferences, which our doctors always attend.

Nonprofit organizations also participate in the Coordinating Council affiliated to the government of St. Petersburg. This Council consists of the leaders of the organizations representing each of the key groups: those who work with people who inject drugs, or who work with LGBT community, or with women, or who provide legal support. In our city, the Health Committee as well as the Committee on social policy work in cooperation with NGOs in the context of HIV infection. I do not think there is another similar model in other regions. NGOs in Saint-Petersburg receive grants and funding not only from health but also from social policy institutions. There are many offices across the city, where peer consultants officially and legally work with the vulnerable groups, provide them support and accompany them to the AIDS Center.

– It seems to me, that we have adopted a western model of interaction, is it true?

– Yes. Basically HIV-infection appeared in Russia later than in Western Europe and the United States. Why to reinvent the wheel, if there is already some experience that can be used? I remember in the late 90s – early 2000s, when the first wave of HIV-infection started, and it spreaded very quickly among people who inject drugs. In one year 10,000 cases were found. At that time, it was something terrible. People were dying. At that time, it was a fatal diagnosis. Then the first bus appeared on the basis of the AIDS Centre, and our head nurse Marina Petrova was sitting in that bus nearby the metro station Gostiny Dvor, taking blood. Back at the time there were no rapid tests, and no one could predict that they will once appear. We used test tubes. This work was done in cooperation with public organizations.

– Are there any effectiveness indicators of such an interaction and what are they?

– Our AIDS center is one of the largest AIDS centers in Russia. 35,000 patients are registered, and a lot of them come from mobile laboratories of local public organizations. There are several organizations in our city that are doing rapid testing and providing counselling about HIV infection. 80% of people, who get their diagnosis during the testing in these organizations, then go and get registered in the AIDS Center. This is very important, because it is not enough just to identify a new case. A person needs some health survey to decide if the therapy is necessary. We must provide some psychological support to help him or her deal with the stress, which is unavoidable when the person learns the diagnosis. We must motivate him or her to be followed up by a doctor. After all, if she or he will be followed up by a doctor, she or he will stay alive. This is the most important thing. If a person receives antiretroviral therapy, he or she does not transmit the virus further. A person lives, and a virus is not spreading.

– The 22nd AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – will be held in Amsterdam, and the organizers would like to see a wide representation of people from Eastern Europe and Central Asia there. Have you participated in previous conferences and do you plan to attend the next one?

– The first AIDS conference I attended was held in Geneva in 1998. Now I plan to attend the conference in Amsterdam. I already have two ideas for the conference abstracts. During the conference, I would like to get new information about the interaction with public organizations.

EECA Organisations Supported Michel Kazatchkine

Michel Kazatchkine, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

AFEW International has reached out to organizations and networks in Eastern Europe and Central Asia with the request to sign the support letter for re-appointment of Michel Kazatchkine as United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

His contract/mandate as UN special envoy on HIV/AIDS for Eastern Europe and Central Asia ends on 30 June. His role in addressing three epidemics in the region (HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis) and to raise awareness at political and scientific level of the concerns regarding HIV, TB and viral hepatitis in the EECA region is crucial and very important, especially now as we have the opportunity to highlight the challenges and successes of the region at AIDS2018 Conference. Therefore, there is a dire need for a continuation of his support.

The letter, signed by more than 70 signatories has been sent to United Nations Secretary General António Guterres. You can read the letter here.

Community-based Participatory Researches are Starting

IMG_114226 applications out of 44 were selected in the small grants programme to support community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia (EECA) region. The small grants fund is part of a wider programme to build the research capacity of community based organisations in EECA region and increase meaningful participation of the region at the AIDS2018.  The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs provides financial support to the programme.

The supported applicants are from 10 countries of the EECA region: Ukraine, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Belarus, Armenia, and Uzbekistan. They represent the following target groups: people who use drugs, people who live with HIV, sex workers, HIV positive women, MSM, transgender people, prisoners, and LGBT.

The total grant fund for the proposals is €230,000. “Previously we announced that the fund was €120,000, but we managed to get more funding and that is how we can afford implementing more projects,” project manager Aids2018EECA in AFEW International Daria Alexeeva is saying.

The grant winners will soon start to implement their researches in their countries. It is expected to have the results of the CBPR in the fall of 2017.

Community-Based Participatory Research: Call for Proposals

img_0902AFEW International in partnership with Flowz and in consultation with the Global Network of People living with HIV and the Eurasian Harm Reduction Network is managing a small grants fund to support community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia (EECA) region. The purpose of the community based participatory research small grants fund is to:

  • Increase CBPR research capacity in the EECA region,
  • Increase the body of CBPR research in the EECA region,
  • Support increased visibility and presence of CBPR from EECA at the International AIDS Conference 2018, which will be held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Note: The selected CBO’s for the small grants fund are expected to submit an abstract for AIDS2018.

The small grants fund is part of a wider programme to build the research capacity of community based organisations in EECA region and increase meaningful participation of the region at the AIDS2018.  The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs gives financial support to the programme.

As a first step, a CBPR training took place in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan in November 2016. 24 participants representing key populations and people living with HIV CBO’s from 11 countries across the EECA region attended this training. These 24 participants were selected from an applicants’ pool of more than 200 applicants.

Criteria for participant selection for the training were among others:

  • Based in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine or Uzbekistan,
  • Community based organisation and working with one or more of the following key populations: drug users, LGBTI, sex workers, or with people living with HIV,
  • A representative regional spread.

Following the training, participants will be able to access online training modules to further shape their research skills. These modules are also accessible for the training applicants who could not be accommodated for the training.

Overview of all CBPR project activities (2016 – 2018)

  • Call for proposals for small research grants (Dec 2016)
  • Selection research projects (Jan 2017)
  • Grants administration and dissemination (Feb 2017)
  • Research projects (Feb 2017 – Fall 2017)
  • Online modules for certification (Nov 2016 – April 2017).
  • Webinar on Data Analysis (late Spring/Summer 2017)
  • Workshop on Dissemination and Abstract Writing for up to 25 participants (Fall 2017)
  • Workshop on Presenting research findings for up to 25 participants (Spring 2018)
  • International AIDS Conference 2018, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (July 2018)

Call for proposals small grants fund

It is expected that grants awarded will be between € 5.000 and €10.000 (maximum).

Applications are strongly encouraged from the 24 training participants and requested only from the training applicants pool, no wider circulation.

Applications will need to be received by January 16th 2017.

Applicants will be informed on the outcomes of their application by the end of January 2017 or early February 2017.

Eligibility criteria for the call for proposals for community based participatory research

An applicant should:

  • Be a participant of the CBPR training held in November 2016, or training applicants, who could not be accommodated for the training
  • Be an organisation based in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine or Uzbekistan,
  • Be a community based organisation (CBO),
  • Be working with one or more of the following key populations: drug users, LGBTI, sex workers, or with people living with HIV,
  • Ensure that their application is able to demonstrate the meaningful and active participation of the community in the research, i.e. that it is truly community based and participatory,
  • Ensure that their research topic relates to HIV/AIDS (includes sexual health, TB, viral hepatitis, psychosocial aspects, treatment adherence, etc.),
  • Ensure that their application is focussed on explanatory, causal or intervention research. Meta analysis or policy analysis are NOT the purpose of this small grants fund.

The applications to the Small Grant CBPR proposals should be submitted online and in Russian or in English. If you are eligible for the call, please click here to start application.

Community Members Learnt how to Do Research Themselves

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Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

24 participants from 11 countries took part in the community-based participatory research training in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan on 8-10 November. Three-day training equipped participants with the skills on how to conduct community based participatory research.

Participants learnt how to form community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships and how to access community strengths and dynamics. The trainers explained how to identify priority public health issues and research questions, how to design and conduct causal, intervention or policy research.

“Being the member of the community myself, I wanted to know about how to conduct the research in the context of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and people who use drugs. Researching is very exciting, especially if you can relate to the topic. Before I did not have any similar training, but now I already have some ideas for the future work,” –director of “Community of people living with HIV in Uzbekistan” Sergey Uchayev says.

Participants became “critical friends”

img_0863The e-learning course, developed by Health[e]Foundation, AFEW and FLOWZ, within the training was meant to equip community based organizations and community members with tools and resources to conduct CBPR.

“What inspired me about people in this workshop was that although they came here two days ago from 11 different countries, they were immediately working together as one group. They became so-called “critical friends” who help and support each other in shaping first ideas into very specific, good quality research plans,” says the project manager of Health[e]Foundation.

img_0637Training participants, lots of whom were members of the communities, got the skills in doing the research and came up with new ideas. They got to know about data collection methods and drafted their research designs. Participants also noticed the practical side of the training. “During the training I came up with many ideas and was able to structure my earlier knowledge for myself. I also started to understand who these researches are for, why they should be conducted and how the results could benefit the communities,” – director of public association “Ameliya” from Kazakhstan Natalya Zholnerova is saying. – “The atmosphere during the training helped studying and sharing my own knowledge. Now I understand more how to choose the region and target group, and what donors are paying attention to.”

Grants will be soon announced

img_1164AFEW International director Anke van Dam announced about the possibility to apply for grants that will support their research. Grants for community based organizations and community members will be announced soon.

“It is very valuable that there is a possibility to write a grant proposal and implement some project in the future,” – the volunteer of Belorussian MRF “Feniks” Kateryna Parfeniuk is saying. – “Every day of this training was useful for me, and now I have valuable instruments for my future work. Informal communication with the training participants provided me with some additional ideas.”

The training in Bishkek was the first step in the capacity building program for community based organizations in order to enable them to develop and conduct CBPR, analyze collected data and present them at the AIDS Conference 2018 in Amsterdam. The following trainings and webinars as well as the online e-course will support developing abstracts for the AIDS2018.

Further information will be available on AFEW website.

24 Participants from 11 Countries Come to the Training in Bishkek

bishkek-640-3214524 participants will take part in the community-based participatory research training that will take place in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, on 8, 9 and 10 November 2016. Participants come from the following countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.

There was a great interest for this training, we received more than 200 applications. Those organizations that were not selected to attend the training will be able to access all the information online. The online e-learning course that will be available from February 2017 onwards.

Those who were not selected for the first training can still be eligible for the next training and/or the call for proposals for the research grant. The next calls for applications will be announced via Facebook and on our website.

Online application for Community-Based Research training

The-main-square-of-Bishkek675AFEW (International) is organising a community-based research programme. The programme consists of several trainings and a small grants fund for community-based research projects. The programme is meant for communities in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) and is aimed to result in the submission of abstracts for the International AIDS Conference 2018, which will be held in Amsterdam.

Please find herewith the link for the application here. If you have more questions about the application, please email us at research@AFEW.nl.

The training will take place in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, on 8, 9 and 10 November 2016. This training is the first step in a community-based research programme.

We are looking for motivated participants from the EECA region with a keen interest, some experience, and familiarity with community-based research. We foresee to invite two participants per organisation: one decision maker and one research implementer. The training is free of charge.

Following the training, you will be able to access online training modules to further shape your research skills. On a later level, training participants are expected to fill in an application form for the community-based research fund. This call will be released towards the end of 2016.

We are now accepting applications to attend the training. The deadline for application is Friday 9 September 2016.

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